Department of ECONOMICS NCR

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Science (Economics Honours)
Academic Year  (2022)

 
1 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBS191AN COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES - 2 2 100
BBS191BN A LIFE WORTH LIVING - FROM HEALTH TO WELL BEING - 2 2 100
BBS191CN MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT - 2 2 100
BENG121N ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION I - 3 3 100
BPSY161AN SCIENCE OF WELLNESS - 2 2 50
BPSY161BN ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY - 2 2 50
BSEH131N PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS - 5 5 100
BSEH132N MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS-I - 5 5 100
BSEH133N HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT - 5 5 100
BSEH141N FINANCIAL ECONOMICS - 4 4 100
BSOC191AN YOUTH AND POPULAR CULTURE - 2 2 50
ENG191AN INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES - 2 2 50
ENG191BN DIGITAL HUMANITIES - 2 2 50
SDEC111N SKILL DEVELOPMENT - 2 1 100
2 Semester - 2022 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BENG221N ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION II - 3 3 100
BSEH231N PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS - 5 5 100
BSEH232N MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS-II - 5 5 100
BSEH233N STATISTICS FOR ECONOMICS-I - 5 5 100
EVS211N ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES - 0 2 50
SDEC212N SKILL DEVELOPMENT - 2 1 100
3 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BSEH322N ACCOUNTING FOR DECISION MAKING - I - 4 4 100
BSEH323N COMPUTER APPLICATIONS FOR ECONOMIC ANALYSIS - I - 4 4 100
BSEH331N INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS - 5 5 100
BSEH332N INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS - 5 5 100
BSEH333N STATISTICS FOR ECONOMICS - II - 5 5 100
BSEH341AN ENTREPRENEURSHIP - 4 4 100
4 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BSEH421N ACCOUNTING FOR DECISION MAKING - II - 4 4 100
BSEH422N COMPUTER APPLICATIONS FOR ECONOMIC ANALYSIS - II - 4 4 100
BSEH431N FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT - 5 5 100
BSEH432N RESEARCH METHODOLOGY - 5 5 100
BSEH433N INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS - 5 5 100
BSEH441AN MONEY AND BANKING - 4 4 100
BSEH441BN ECONOMICS OF EDUCATION - 4 4 100
5 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BSEH521N HEALTH ECONOMICS: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS - 4 4 100
BSEH531N INDIAN ECONOMY - 5 5 100
BSEH532N INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS - 5 5 100
BSEH533N BEHAVIOURAL ECONOMICS - 5 5 100
BSEH541BN ADVANCED ECONOMETRICS - 4 4 100
BSEH581N INTERNSHIP - 2 2 100
6 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BSEH631N PUBLIC ECONOMICS - 5 5 100
BSEH632N OPERATIONS RESEARCH - 4 4 100
BSEH633N DISSERTATION - 5 5 100
      

    

Department Overview:

The Department of Economics, CHRIST (Deemed to be University) Delhi NCR Campus, formed in 2019 consists of a faculty pool with rich experience in teaching, research and consultancy. The Department has five full-time faculty members with specialisation in Development Economics, Rural and Health Economics, Quantitative Economics, Agricultural Economics, Resource Economics, involving in advanced research.

Mission Statement:

Vision

Establish an identity as a department of high standard in teaching and research in Economics.

 Mission

Equip students with advanced knowledge and skill sets to address real world economic problems and undertake cutting edge research on contemporary economic issues.

Introduction to Program:

The BSc Economics Honours Programme with non-core subjects Mathematics, Statistics and integrated courses in commerce and finance, is designed to produce graduates trained in the application of knowledge in economics to real-life economic, financial, ethical and analytical problems encountered in the economy. It is structured to provide the students with the skills and professional acumen to become key players in the economy irrespective of their future job places and task diversification they would take up specially in the field of quantitative analysis. The programme may enable the students to effectively apply their knowledge and skills to situations of economic, institutional and policy making both in governance, industry as well as research.

 

The programme has a rigorous focus on quantitative techniques and research methods which will orient the students in dealing with economic problems with a practical and analytical approach. The diversity and the spread of the programme ensure that the students receive sufficient experience of the current issues and crises of the world especially that of the emerging economies, developed & developing economies.

Program Objective:

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: Demonstrate analytical, creative and imaginative engagement with theory, research and practice in the chosen discipline..

PO2: Demonstrate necessary knowledge of interdisciplinary areas

PO3: Analyse and evaluate economic and financial policies

PO4: Exhibit critical thinking, interpretative and basic leadership abilities

PO5: Evaluate provincial, national and worldwide issues from the financial point of view

PO6: Demonstrate advanced knowledge of discipline-specific areas of Economics

PO7: Undertake research and demonstrate their expertise in all its stages

Assesment Pattern

The Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) will be assessed for seventy per cent weightage and the End Semester Examination (ESE) for thirty per cent weightage. The practical courses and the common core courses will be assessed out of hundred marks in various components including attendance. The Mid Semester and End Semester written examination question pattern consists of questions divided into two or three sections with short answers, short essays and long essays.

 

Examination And Assesments

The evaluation is divided in to two components: Continuous Internal Assessment (CIA) including Mid Semester Examination (MSE), and the End Semester Examination (ESE).

BBS191AN - COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

This course examines the relationship between language use, enormous variety of language experiences, belief systems, and behavioral patterns. On the other hand Etiquette helps smooth the path of our daily activities, whether it's meeting others in our daily interactions talking to someone on the phone, offering condolences properly or understanding how to talk to colleagues at a business conference. Being aware of the beliefs attitudes and etiquettes of individuals will help one to become more tolerant from one individual to the next and from one group to the next.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Students will practice critical thoughts in comprehending the notion of culture, its relationship with language, etiquette and the key concepts of cross-cultural Communication.

CO2: It also describes ways to apply proper courtesy in different situations.

CO3: It will also help to better understand the change that constantly undergoes in personal and social use.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction: Greetings and Courtesy
 

            Greeting a person, saying good bye to another person, thank you, excuse me. Introduction to oneself, yawning, coughing, interrupting, offering help, refusing help, requesting privacy, speaking in a low voice, waiting for help, accepting or declining an invitation, expressing admiration, The key principles of common courtesy, professional manners and the "Golden Rule" as they are practiced in the workplace environment, classroom etiquette and student behavior guidelines, The guidelines for maintaining a civil classroom environment.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Manners and Civility
 

Introduction to adjusting to a new culture. Theories on second language and culture acquisition, communication, national standards, culture acquisition through family and homestays. Distinguish among the three main forms of communication in the workplace: verbal, nonverbal, and virtual. Proper and improper uses of workplace communication, the potential repercussions of poor listening in the workplace, the proper and improper use of technology in the workplace.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Etiquette
 

Why etiquette matters, identify common cultural differences, taboos, and customs that may be practiced in the workplace, discuss ways to navigate and honor cultural differences in the workplace, describe how to express an appropriate awareness of international and other customs. The common courtesies of life, polite conversation, telephone etiquette, correspondence, basic table manners, overnight guests, wedding etiquette, moments of sorrow, appropriate behavior for children, gift giving guidelines.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Business Etiquette
 

Introduction to modern etiquette, the rules of the workplace, meetings and introductions, conversation and listening skills, telephone/cell phone, texting, emailing and internet etiquette, etiquette in public places, employment/volunteer etiquette, dining etiquette, social gathering etiquette (guest and host/hostess), school etiquette, confidence without arrogance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Personal and Professional Presentation
 

Restaurant etiquette, cellphone etiquette, voice mail etiquette, air travel etiquette, cocktail party etiquette, office gossip etiquette, business dress etiquette, email etiquette, social media etiquette, job interview etiquette, international etiquette

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Lectures/Discussions/Videos and Role Plays

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1-30 Marks

CIA 2-30 Marks

CIA 3-30 Marks

Attendance-5 Marks

Class Participation- 5 Marks

BBS191BN - A LIFE WORTH LIVING - FROM HEALTH TO WELL BEING (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To examine health in its truest sense, one must explore beyond the limits of medicine to engage a much wider set of questions embracing social, cultural, political, economic, moral and spiritual aspects of human experience. The aim of this course is for students to gain greater insight into the multi-dimensional aspects of health and to develop a more holistic and humanistic appreciation of wellbeing in both a personal and societal context. The course focuses on the knowledge and skills students require to lead a healthy, productive and balanced life.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Explain health as a multi-dimensional and dynamic concept, which necessarily integrates individual, societal, biomedical, spiritual, cultural and historical influences, and how this relates to health issues encountered in everyday life.

CO2: Assess the inter-relatedness of health perceptions and practices across cultures.

CO3: Discuss personal responsibilities towards achieving wellbeing in a rational way and how this contributes to the individual, community and global good.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to health
 

Health of individuals and communities – The significance of determinants of health and how these raise or lower the health of individuals and communities - Health promotion to improve health - Personal and popular attitudes and beliefs and their impact on decision making - self-management - interpersonal and key consumer health skills - Factors influencing health, and actions and strategies to protect and promote health, through investigation and inquiry processes.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:4
Food and Values
 

Philosophy of food, Values – Three different types of values, Meat – Is it wrong to eat animals?Hunger – Do we have a duty to help starving people? - Drugs – Why is it wrong to take drugs? - GM food – How should food technology be regulated? - Capitalism – Food, globalization, and equality - Art – Can food be art? What is art? - Taste – Is taste entirely subjective? - Science – Can science explain conscious taste experiences? -Eating – Eat to live, or live to eat.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:4
Nutrition
 

Balanced diet & Nutrition, Macro and micro nutrients – Nutritive and nonnutritive components of diet – Eating for weight control – healthy weight – The pitfalls of dieting – food intolerance and food myths – Food supplements for adolescents.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Physical Education
 

Concept of physical education – Meaning – definition – aims – objectives of physical education and fitness – Need & importance of fitness – Types of fitness – Health related physical fitness – performance related physical fitness – physical activities and health benefits - Activities for developing physical fitness

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Sleep
 

What is sleep? – The phylogeny of sleep – Developmental course of sleep – Dreams- Functions of sleep – Daytime sleepiness and alertness – Sleep disorders

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Safety education and health promotion
 

Principles of accident prevention – health and safety in daily life – health and safety at work – first aid and emergency care – common injuries and their management

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:4
Spirituality, Religion and Social Change
 

Meaning of life - Meaning of death- Indian Rituals, symbols, and myths - Spirituality, altruism and moral justice - Resources to deal with stress, temptations, disappointments and failures, social oppression, the loss of possessions and of loved ones, and with one’s own death.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Mental Heatlth and Wel Being at Work place. Hasson and Butler.  Capstone; 1st edition (7 May 2020)

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Mental Heatlth and Wel Being at Work place. Hasson and Butler.  Capstone; 1st edition (7 May 2020)

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: Submissions for 20 marks

CIA 2: 25 marks

CIA 3: Submissions 20 marks

CIA 4: Submission for 30 marks

BBS191CN - MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Meaning of life - Meaning of death- Indian Rituals, symbols, and myths - Spirituality, altruism and moral justice - Resources to deal with stress, temptations, disappointments and failures, social oppression, the loss of possessions and of loved ones, and with one’s own death. 

The Mahabharata of the great Maharishi Veda Vyasa is a treasure trove of knowledge, principles and paradigms. It is written that what is not in the Mahabharata will not be found elsewhere. Written nearly thousands of years ago, the Mahabharata is as yet a source of knowledge, especially modern management principles.In essence it highlights the victory of Dharma in times of Adharma.This subject is a comprehensive learning on management lessons which can be inferred from the great epic. It gives a clear understanding and comparison of management Principles, practices and the various functions of management with the epic. The syllabus is structured to provide basic conceptual knowledge on the principles of management. It also deals with behavioral issues in the individual processes, group and interpersonal processes.

 

Course Objectives:

  • ·         Discuss the epic by summarizing the various parvas/units in class in accordance with the management concepts
  • ·         Review and make a critical estimate of the epic with a focus on morals, ethics, legal and management concepts 
  •            To develop competencies and knowledge of students to become effective professionals

Learning Outcome

CO1: Students will get to know team work and group dynamics

CO2: Students will get to know determination and hard work and its implication on business decision

CO3: Students will be able to appreciate the role of general management for the success of an organization

CO4: This subject will enable them to enhance their Moral, social, ethical and professional skills

CO5: To understand the manner in which strategic and competitive advantage is developed

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Mahabharatha
 

The older generations-The Pandava and Kaurava princes- Lakshagraha (the house of lac) Establishment of the kingdom-Administration and Management principles

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Marriage and Building of New city
 

Marriage to Draupadi- An event study approach.

 

Indraprastha-A new beginning- Pressure for change – Change process, Types of change, Factors influencing change, Resistance to change

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
The Big Game
 

The dice game- Cooperative strategies & Reasons for strategic alliances-

 

Exile and return- Risks and costs of strategic alliances

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
The battle at Kurukshetra
 

The battle at Kurukshetra - Strategic Planning and Management- levels at which strategy operates- Event approaches to strategic decision making,

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Post Kurukshetra
 

The end of the Pandavas- Succession Planning,Authority and Responsibility

 

The reunion Organizing- Choosing the organizational structure 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Rao, V.S.P., & Krishna, V.H., (2011). Strategic Management: Text and Cases. New Delhi: Excel Books.

Pratap Chandra Roy ,The complete Mahabharata translated into English prose directly from the original sanskrit text.(1st Edition) oriental publishing co.

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - 70 ( 65+5)

ESE - 30

BENG121N - ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

English Language and Composition course is an intensive program for two semesters for all the students of the BA/BSc programmes (ENGH, EPH, ECOH, JOUH, PSYH, MEP) that introduces students to a wide range of expository works in order to develop their knowledge of rhetoric and make them aware of the power of language. The course is designed to meet the rigorous requirements of a graduate level courses and therefore includes expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and historical contexts. It would provide students with the opportunity to work with the rhetorical situation, examining the authors’ purposes as well as the audiences and the subjects in texts.

The purpose of the course is to enable students to read analytically, formulate arguments based on the readings, and respond by composing articulate essays that utilize advanced elements of sentence structure, syntax, style, purpose, and tone. Thus, by the use of rhetorical principles, students will learn how to become critical thinkers, and apply that knowledge to their writing by revising and improving their essays, as well as critiquing and editing peer essays. In addition, students will be required to thoroughly research relevant topics, synthesize information from a variety of sources, and document their knowledge in a cogent well written report. Also, as the course is designed to engage students with rhetoric in multiple mediums, including visual media such as photographs, films, advertisements, comic strips, music videos, and TED talks; students would develop a sense to comprehend how resource of language operates in any given text. While the first semester focusses on understanding principles of rhetoric through multiple texts, the second semester is more thematic in nature familiarizing students with texts from multiple disciplines, especially in the context of India.

As part of the course students are expected to maintain a writing journal to monitor their progress in writing.

Course Objectives

To enable students to:

·         Enable students to become Independent critical thinker, who are aware of the power of language.

·         Enable students to become excellent communicators of the language.

·         Equip students with necessary skills for graduate course and for career.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Analyze and interpret samples of good writing by identifying and explaining an author's Use of rhetorical strategies and techniques.

CO2: Communicate effectively in different media by developing their LSRW skills.

CO3: Analyze both visual and written texts.

CO4: Apply effective strategies and techniques in their own writing.

CO5: Create and sustain arguments based on reading, research, and/or personal experience.

CO6: Demonstrate understanding and mastery of the English Language as well as stylistic maturity in their own writings.

CO7: Produce expository, analytical, and argumentative compositions that introduce a complex central idea and develop it with appropriate evidence drawn from primary and/or secondary source material, cogent explanations, and clear transitions.

CO8: Move effectively through the stages of the writing process with careful attention to inquiry and research, drafting, revising, editing, and review.

CO9: Write thoughtfully about their own process of composition

CO10: Revise a work to make it suitable for a different audience

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Rhetoric and Rhetoric Situation
 

a.       Lou Gehrig’s Farewell Speech

https://www.lougehrig.com/farewell/

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
SOAP Analysis
 

Through the analysis of the text the aim to look at the mode in which various factors like subject, occasion, audience and purpose impacts rhetoric.

a.       Letter to Einstein and Reply.

http://www.lettersofnote.com/2012/05/deareinstein-do-scientists-pray.html

b.      George W. Bush 9/11 speech 

http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/gwbush911addresstothenation.htm

c.       Tryst with Destiny by Jawaharlal Nehru

http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/jawaharlalnehrutrystwithdestiny.htm

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Language of Composition
 

The unit will focus on understanding Rhetoric and Various Rhetoric situation. The aim is to assert the idea that rhetoric is always contextual and there is a link between the speaker, audience and what the content of the text is. This will enable students to understand the significance of context while analysing and composing a text.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Ethos, Pathos and Logos
 

Understanding Aristotle’s concept of Ethos, Pathos and Logos is significant in understanding an effective rhetoric. By looking at some of the famous rhetorical works the aim is to understand how the writer’s/ orators of some of the famous rhetorical pieces have used these elements to persuade the reader/ audience.

Ethos

a.       King George VI King’s Speech (Can play part of the movie) https://www.awesomestories.com/asset/view/George-VI-King-s-Speech-September-3-1939

b.      The Myth of Latin Women: I Just met a Girl Named Maria https://www.quia.com/files/quia/users/amccann10/Myth_of_a_Latin_Woman

c.       Quit India Speech by Gandhi

Logos

a.       Slow Food Nation by Alice Waters https://www.thenation.com/article/slowfood-nation/  

b.      My Vision for India by Abdul Kalam.

Pathos

a.       Richard Nixon, from The Checkers Speech

http://watergate.info/1952/09/23/nixon-checkers-speech.html

b.      Dwight D. Eisenhower, Order of the Day

https://www.whatsoproudlywehail.org/curriculum/the-americancalendar/order-of-the-day-6-june-1944

c.       Bal Gangadhar Tilak http://speakola.com/political/bal-gangadhar-tilakfreedom-is-my-birthright-1917

Combining Ethos, Logos, and Pathos

a.       Toni Morrison, Dear Senator Obama http://observer.com/2008/01/tonimorrisons-letter-to-barack-obama /

b.      Crisis of Civilization by Rabindranath Tagore

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Reading Written Texts
 

Focus of the unit would be to introduce multiple ways of analysis, close reading, and usage of argumentative statements and diction.

a.       Queen Elizabeth, Speech to the Troops at Tilbury http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/tilbury.htm  

b.      Winston Churchill, Blood, Toil, Tears, and Sweat. https://www.winstonchurchill.org/resources/speeches/1940-the-finesthour/blood-toil-tears-and-sweat-2/

c.       Ralph Ellison, from On Bird, Bird-Watching and Jazz

http://www.unz.org/Pub/SaturdayRev-1962jul28-00047

d.      Joan Didion, The Santa Ana Winds

https://tywls12ela.wikispaces.com/file/view/Didion+Los+Angeles+Notebook.pdf

e.       Virginia Woolf, The Death of the Moth

f.       Groucho Marx, Dear Warner Brother https://archive.org/details/Groucho_Marx_Letter_to_Warner_Brothers  

g.      Christopher Morley, On Laziness

 http://essays.quotidiana.org/morley/laziness/

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Reading Visual Texts
 

The unit will focus on how to read visual text and the impact it has on audience.

a.       ACLU, The Man on the Left (advertisement)

b.      Tom Toles, Rosa Parks (cartoon)

http://thenexthurrah.typepad.com/the_next_hurrah/2005/10/rosa_parks.html

c.       http://webneel.com/rk-lakshman-editorial-cartoons-indian-cartoonist  (Political Cartoons) India

d.      https://www.tatacliq.com/que/isro-launch-breaks-record-memes/  ISRO Launch (Times)

Analyzing Advertisements (Fair and Lovely), gender stereotypes in ads

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Determining Effective and Ineffective Rhetoric
 

The unit will engage with the questions on why few texts are effective rhetorical pieces as opposed to others. A few texts will be analysed to look at different rhetorical situations, and how it is effective and ineffective in persuading the audience/ reader.

a.       Jane Austen, from Pride and Prejudice

b.      PETA, Feeding Kids Meat Is Child Abuse (advertisement) 25

c.       Anne Applebaum, If the Japanese Can’t Build a Safe Reactor, Who Can?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/if-the-japanese-cant-build-a-safereactor-who-can/2011/03/14/ABCJvuV_story.html?utm_term=.8

d.      Stop for Pedestrians (advertisement)

e.       The Times, The Man Takes First Steps on the Moon

f.       William Safire, In Event of Moon Disaster

http://mentalfloss.com/article/57908/event-moon-disaster-white-house-speechworst-case-scenario

g.      Herblock, Transported (cartoon)

h.      Ted Talk: Speak Like a Leader https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGBamfWasNQ

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
From Reading to Writing
 

By carefully reading the viewpoints of others and considering a range of ideas on an issue, one develops a clearer understanding of our own beliefs — a necessary foundation to writing effective arguments. The unit will focus on analysing elements of argument as a means of critical thinking and an essential step toward crafting argumentative essays. The unit will focus on making an argument and supporting it by synthesising multiple sources.

a.       Understanding Argument

https://csalexander03.wordpress.com/2012/12/04/whyinvesting-in-fast-food-may-be-a-good-thing-by-amy-domini/

b.      http://www.nytimes.com/2004/07/11/opinion/felons-and-the-right-to-vote.html

c.       Using Visual text for Argument

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjjV_X5re4g

d.      Using sources to inform an Argument

e.       Using Sources to Appeal to Audience.

Text Books And Reference Books:

The course is based on the work Language of Composition: Reading, Writing and Rhetoric by Renee H. Shea, Lawrence Sanclon and Robin Dissin Aufses. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

The course is based on the work Language of Composition: Reading, Writing and Rhetoric by Renee H. Shea, Lawrence Sanclon and Robin Dissin Aufses. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA Evaluation Pattern                                          

Individual Assignment

Group Assessment

Mid Semester

20

20

25

 Mid Semester Examination

Section A

Section B

Section C

Section D

2X10=20

1X15=15

1X15=15

50

End Semester Examination

BPSY161AN - SCIENCE OF WELLNESS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course heralds the emergence of a new field of science that endeavours to understand how individuals and societies thrive and flourish, and how this new knowledge can be applied to foster happiness, health and fulfillment. Taking a dynamic, cross-disciplinary approach, the course explores the most promising routes to well-being, derived from the latest research in psychology, neuroscience, economics, and the effects of our natural environment. The course provides an overview of the latest insights and strategies for enhancing our individual well-being, or the well-being of the communities in which we live and work,

1. Understand the evolution and development of health and well-being

2.  Develop a holistic approach to living life well.

3.  Create optimal programs for individuals and populations.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to analyze various perspectives from the latest research in psychology, neuroscience, economics, and the effects of our natural environment on well being

CO2: Integration of various aspects to have a holistic perspective on wellbeing

CO3: Ability to design interventions to enhance positive mental health in individuals and populations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Well-Being
 

Well being as a concept, happiness, and subjective well-being, Expanding the repertoire of positive emotions: The broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions; Relationship with reality and its role in the well-being of young adults; Increasing happiness in life.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Well-being across life-span
 

Living well at every stage of life: Resilience in childhood, positive youth development, life tasks of adulthood and successful aging; Role of meaningful relationships: infant attachment, adult attachment, love and flourishing relationships.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Socio-cultural and Economic Considerations
 

The relevance of subjective well-being to social policies: optimal experience and tailored intervention; The social context of well-being; Does money buy happiness?; A well-being manifesto for a flourishing society.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

Felicia A. Huppert, Nick Baylis, and Barry Keverne (2005). The Science of Well- Being. Oxford University Press.

Synder,C.R., & Lopez, S.J. (2007). Positive Psychology. New Delhi: Sage Publishing House.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Coan, R. W. (1977). Hero, artist, sage, or saint? A survey of what is variously called mental health, normality, maturity, self-actualization, and human fulfillment. New York: Columbia University Press.

Boniwell, I. (2012). Positive Psychology In a Nutshell: The Science of Happiness (3rdedition). London: Mc Graw Hill.

Bradburn, N. M. (1969). The structure of psychological well-being. Chicago, IL:Aldine.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA Evaluation pattern

 

Individual

Assignment

Group Assignment/

field work 

Class Participation

Attendance

Total

 

30

10

5

5

50

 

 

BPSY161BN - ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Outcomes

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

1. Apply the psychological perspectives of advertisements in the real life setting.

2. Integrate different domains such as cognitive, affective and behavioral responses in the field of advertisement.

3. Develop the ability to make applications based on understanding of marketing strategies. 

 

Unit-1                                                                                                    Teaching Hours:10

Unit I: Introduction to advertisement psychology

Introduction to advertisements;

its objectives and importance;

Types and forms of advertising;

Effects of advertisements - a psychological perspective;

 

Unit-2                                                                                                              Teaching Hours:10

Unit II: Cognitive processing of advertisements

Influence of advertisements on buying behaviors;

Dynamics of Attention, Comprehension,

Reasoning for advertisements; 

Principles of persuasion and attitude change;  

 

Unit-3                                                                                                                Teaching Hours:10

Unit III: International Advertising and Creating Brand

Emergence of International Advertising;

Advertising in Multicultural Environment;

Ethics in Advertising;

Integrated marketing communication and marketing mix. 

Learning Outcome

1: Apply the psychological perspectives of advertisements in the real-life setting.

2: Integrate different domains such as cognitive, affective and behavioral responses in the field of advertisement.

3: Develop the ability to make applications based on understanding of marketing strategies.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Unit I: Introduction to advertisement psychology
 

Introduction to advertisements; its objectives and importance;

Types and forms of advertising;

Effects of advertisements - a psychological perspective;

Classic and contemporary approaches of classifying advertisement effectiveness.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Unit II: Cognitive processing of advertisements
 

Influence of advertisements on buying behaviors;

Dynamics of Attention, Comprehension, Reasoning for advertisements;

Attitudes and attitude changes with the influence of advertisements;

Principles of persuasion and attitude change;

Achieving advertisement compliance without changing attitude.   

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Unit III: International Advertising and Creating Brand
 

Emergence of International Advertising;

Advertising in Multicultural Environment;

Ethics in Advertising;

Integrated marketing communication and marketing mix.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Fennis, B. M., & Stroebe, W. (2015). The Psychology of Advertising. New York: Psychology Press.

Andrew,A. Mitchell. (1993). Advertising Exposure, Memory and Choice. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Hillsdale, NJ.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Linda, F. Alwitt& Andrew, A. Mitchell. (1985). Psychological Processes and Advertising Effects: Theory, Research, and Applications. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Hillsdale, NJ. London.

Rolloph, M.E. & Miller, G.R. (Eds) (1980). Persuasion: New Directions in Theory and Research.Sage. N.Y.

Eddie. M. Clark, Timothy.C. Brock ,& David W. Stewart. (1994). Attention, Attitude and Affect in Response to Advertising. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Hillsdale, NJ.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1

CIA 2

Class Participation

Attendance

Total

20

20

5

5

50

BSEH131N - PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

This course is designed to expose the students to the basic principles of microeconomic theory. The emphasis will be on thinking like an economist and the course will illustrate how microeconomic concepts can be applied to analyze real-life situations.

 

Course Objectives

·       Understand that economics is about the allocation of scarce resources and how that results in trade-offs.

·       Understand the role of prices in allocating scarce resources in market economies and explain the consequences of government policies in the form of price controls.

 

·       Appreciate positive as well as normative view points on concepts of market failure and the need for government intervention.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: The students will have acquainted with the basic principles of microeconomic theory.

CO2: They will be able to think like economists.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Exploring the Subject Matter of Economics
 

Why study economics? Scope and method of economics; the economic problem: scarcity and choice; the question of what to produce, how to produce and how to distribute output; science of economics; the basic competitive model; prices, property rights and profits; incentives and information; rationing; opportunity sets; economic systems; reading and working with graphs.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Supply and Demand: How Markets Work, Markets and Welfare
 

Markets and competition; determinants of individual demand/supply; demand/supply schedule and demand/supply curve; market versus individual demand/supply; shifts in the demand/supply curve, demand and supply together; how prices allocate resources; elasticity and its application; controls on prices; taxes and the costs of taxation; consumer surplus; producer surplus and the efficiency of the markets.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
The Households
 

The consumption decision - budget constraint, consumption and income/price changes, demand for all other goods and price changes; description of preferences (representing preferences with indifference curves); properties of indifference curves; consumer‘s optimum choice; income and substitution effects; labour supply and savings decision - choice between leisure and consumption.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
The Firm and Perfect Market Structure
 

Behaviour of profit maximizing firms and the production process; short run costs and output decisions; costs and output in the long run.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Imperfect Market Structure
 

Monopoly and anti-trust policy; government policies towards competition; imperfect competition.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Input Markets
 

Labour and land markets - basic concepts (derived demand, productivity of an input, marginal productivity of labour, marginal revenue product); demand for labour; input demand curves; shifts in input demand curves; competitive labour markets; and labour markets and public policy; New Frontiers in Microeconomics.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Case, K. E., Fair, R. C., &Oster, S. M. (2013). Principles of Microeconomics (11th ed.). London: Pearson Education Inc.

Mankiw, N. G.  (2017). Principles of Microeconomics (8th ed.). MA: Cengage Learning.

Stiglitz, J. E., & Walsh, C. E. (2006). Principles of Microeconomics (4th ed.). New York: W.W. Norton & Company Inc., International Student Edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Lipsey, R. G., & Chrystal, K. A. (1999). Principles of Economics (9th ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Mankiw, N. G. (2011). Economics: Principles and Applications (10th ed.). MA: Cengage Learning.

Pindyck, R. S., &Rubinfeld, D. L. (2013). Microeconomics (8th ed.). New York: Pearson Education.

Ray, N.C. (1975). An Introduction to Microeconomics. New Delhi: Macmillan Company of India Ltd.

Salvatore, D. (2011). Managerial Economics in a Global Economy (7th ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Samuelson, P. A., & Nordhaus, W.D. (2010). Economics (19th ed.). New Delhi:  McGraw-Hill Companies.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

BSEH132N - MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS-I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This is the first of a compulsory two-course sequence. The objective of this sequence is to transmit the body of basic mathematics that enables the study of economic theory at the undergraduate level, specifically the courses on microeconomic theory, macroeconomic theory, statistics and econometrics set out in this syllabus. In this course, particular economic models are not the ends, but the means for illustrating the method of applying mathematical techniques to economic theory in general. The level of sophistication at which the material is to be taught is indicated by the contents of the prescribed textbook.

Learning Outcome

CO1: The students will be able to apply mathematical techniques and models for the deeper understanding of economics, especially the branches of microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Preliminaries
 

 Elements of logic and proof; Sets and Set operations; Relations; Equations: Linear and Quadratic; Simultaneous Equations; Functions: quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic; Graphs, Slopes and Intercept; Economic Application of Graphs and Equations: Iso-cost Lines, Supply and Demand Analysis, Income determination models.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Differential Calculus: Single Independent Variable Functions
 

Limits; Continuity; Curvilinear Functions; the Derivative; Rules of Differentiation; Higher-order Derivatives; Optimisation; Uses of the Derivatives in Economics: Increasing and Decreasing Functions, Concavity and Convexity, Inflection points, Optimisation of Economic Functions, Relationship among Total, Marginal and Average Concepts.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Differential Calculus: Multivariable Functions
 

Multivariable Functions and Partial Derivatives; Rules of Partial Differentiation; Second and Higher-order differentials; Optimisation; Constrained optimisation with Lagrange Multipliers; Implicit functions; Application of Partial Derivatives in Economics: Utility Maximisation, Marginal Productivity, Elasticity, Producers Equilibrium, Optimisation of Cobb Douglas and CES Production Function.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Differential Calculus: Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
 

Exponential and Logarithmic Functions; Solving Natural Exponential and Logarithmic Functions; Logarithmic transformation of Nonlinear Functions; Rules of Differentiation; Higher-order Derivatives, Partial Derivatives; Optimisation of Exponential and Logarithmic Functions; Logarithmic differentiation; Application in Economics: Elasticity, Alternative measures of growth, Optimal Timing, Derivation of Cobb Douglas Production Function.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Chiang, A.C. & Wainwright, K.  (2013). Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics. (4th ed.). McGraw Hill Education (India) Private Limited.

Sydsaeter, K. &   Hammond, P. (2016). Mathematics for Economic Analysis. New Delhi: Pearson Education Inc.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Dowling, E.  T. (2012). Schaum’s Outlines-Introduction to Mathematical Economics. (3rd ed.).  New York: McGraw Hill.

Renshaw, G. (2011). Maths for Economics. (4th ed.).  Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Roser, M. (2003). Basic Mathematics for Economists. (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge.

Evaluation Pattern

EvaluationPattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

BSEH133N - HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is designed to be intellectually stimulating and charts out the economic thought from mercantilism to the contemporary period. This course is meant to create an understanding of the economic theory, ideas, doctrines and postulates of the various schools of thought proposed and developed by various economists. Economic thought forms the basis of the ideology and policies adopted in different countries.

  • To trace the historical beginnings of economic theories, doctrines and postulates of the different schools of thought and chart out the developments over time.
  • To correlate and associate the different economists with the various schools of thought.
  • To understand the relationship between economic thought and other social science disciplines.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Appreciate why ideologies differ in different countries.

CO2: Understand the economic theories and postulates put forth by the different schools of thought.

CO3: Identify the economists associated with the various schools of thought.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Mercantilism and Classical School
 

Mercantilism; Laissez Faire: Quesnay and the Physiocrats; Adam Smith: invisible hand, accumulation and income distribution, value, market and competition, institutions; Ricardo–Corn Laws and Theory of Rent; J S Mill: Synthesis of classical economics

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Marx?s Economic Theory
 

Exploitation and value; wages, trade cycle and laws of movement of the capitalist economy; monetary aspects of the cycle and the crisis.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Marginalist Revolution and Neoclassical Orthodoxy
 

Neoclassical theoretical system; Neo classical orthodoxy- Belle époque; Alfred Marshal

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Years of High Theory
 

John Maynard Keynes: the general theory; J A Schumpeter: equilibrium and development, trade cycle and money; Market forms: Sraffa–Chamberlin–Joan Robinson: contribution to the study of market forms.

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Contemporary Developments to Economic Theory
 

Golden age to stagflation; Neo-classical Synthesis-Correction: money and inflation; Monetarist Counter Revolution: Milton Friedman; Post Keynesian Approach: Anti-Neoclassical reinterpretation of Keynes; New Keynesian Macroeconomics.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Developments in New Welfare Economics
 

The debate about market failures and Coase’s theorem; The theory of social choice: Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem; Asymmetric information: Akerlof; Economic Theories of Justice.

 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:15
Institutionalist and Evolutionary Theory
 

Unconventional economists: Nicholas Georgescu Roegen and Albert Hirschman; Approaches to institutional analysis: Contractarian, Utilitarian and Evolutionary neo–institutionalism; Von Hayek and the neo-Austrian School. Feminist Economics and economists: Bina Agarwal Randy Albelda andDiane Elson

 

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:10
Economic Thought in India and Economic Ideas of Nobel Laureates
 

Gandhian Economic Thought, P.R. Brahamananda, A.K. Sen (1998), Robert A. Mundell (1999), Joseph Stiglitz (2001), Paul Krugman (2008), Richard Thaler (2017)

Text Books And Reference Books:

Screpanti, E &Zamagni, S. (2006). An Outline of the History of Economic Thought. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

Gide, C and Rist, C. (2007). A History of Economic Doctrines. New Delhi: Surjeet Publications.

Greenwald, B. C., & Stiglitz, J. E. (1990). Asymmetric Information and the New Theory of the Firm: Financial Constraints and Risk Behavior (No. w3359). National Bureau of Economic Research.

Kapp, W and Kapp, L., (1960). History of Economic Thought–A Book of Readings (6th ed.). New York: Barnes Noble Inc.

Keynes, J.M. (1939). The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money. The University of Adelaide Library Electronic Texts Collection.

Krugman, P. (2009). The increasing returns revolution in trade and geography. The American Economic Review, 99(3), 561-571.

Mill, J.S. and Bentham, J. (2004) Utilitarianism and other Essays. London: Penguin Classics.

Mundell, R. A. (1961). A theory of optimum currency areas. The American economic review51(4), 657-665.

Robbins, L. (2000). A History of Economic Thought: The LSE Lectures” (Eds.) by Steven G. Medema and Warren J. Samuels, Princeton: Princeton University Press

Sen, A. K. (2017). Collective choice and social welfare, Expanded edition, London: Penguin.

Smith, A. (2003). The Wealth of Nations. New York: Bantam Classic Edition.

Thaler, R. (1985). Mental Accounting and Consumer Choice. Marketing science4(3), 199-214.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE*

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

BSEH141N - FINANCIAL ECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course introduces students to the conceptual and practical operations of the financial markets, institutions and instruments network in Indian context.  The course touches up on the topics of financial regulations, equity market, stock evaluation, stock returns and derivative market.

Course Objectives

· To provide students with in-depth understanding of the operational issues of capital market and money market with its regulatory framework.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: The students will be able to understand the various concepts and practical operations of the financial markets and apply them in real life.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Financial Economics
 

Role of financial intermediation - Financial markets - Money vs. capital markets - Primary vs. secondary markets - Instruments in the money market - Instruments in the capital markets -  Financial institutions; Banking and credit.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Financial Regulations and Financial Sector Reforms
 

Money Market regulations – Banking sector reforms – quarterly credit policy of RBI - Capital market regulations of SEBI- Legal issues in security trading - FERA & FEMA - Capital account convertibility; International regulatory framework.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Equity Market
 

IPO and Book building process - Private vs. Public placement – Stock market indexes - Stock quotations – understanding secondary market operations.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Stock Evaluations
 

Stock evaluation methods -    Fundamental vs. Technical analysis - Factors affecting stock prices - Economic factors - Market related factors - Firm specific factors - Indicators of future stock prices - Efficient Market Hypothesis -    Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM).

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Stock Risk & Return Analysis
 

Measures of risk - Risk and return framework and investment decisions - Methods of determining maximum expected loss – Estimating beta of the stock.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Derivative Securities Market
 

Financial future market: Markowitz model - Valuation of financial futures - Option market - Speculation with option market – Hedging - Arbitrage and foreign exchange futures market.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Madura, Jeff. (2015). Financial Institutions and Markets (11th ed.), Cengage Learning, USA.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Bailey, R. E. (2005). The economics of financial markets. Cambridge University Press.

Copeland, T. E., Weston, J. F., & Shastri, K. (2005). Financial theory and corporate policy. (4th ed.), Pearson.

Farrell, J. L., & Reinhart, W. J. (1997). Portfolio management: theory and application. McGraw-Hill.

Fisher, E. Donald., &Jordan, J. Roland. (1995). Security Analysis and Portfolio management (6th ed.), Pearson India.

Hearth, D., &Zaima, J. K. (2001). Contemporary investments: security and portfolio analysis. Harcourt College Publ.

Hull, J. C., (2016). Futures, Options and other Derivatives (9thed.), Pearson.

L. M. Bhole., &J. Mahakud. (2009). Financial Institutions and Markets (5th ed.), McGraw-Hill.

Machiraju, H. R. (2010). Indian financial system. Vikas Publishing House.

Palat, R. (2010). Fundamental Analysis (4th ed.), Vision Books Pvt. Ltd.

Radcliffe, R. C. (1997). Investment Concepts, Analysis and Strategies (5th ed.), Addison Wesley.

Ross, S. A., Westerfield, R., & Jordan, B. D. (2017). Fundamentals of Corporate Finance (11thed.), McGraw-Hill.

Shanken, J. (1982). The arbitrage pricing theory: is it testable?.The Journal of Finance, 37(5), 1129-1140.

W. Sharpe., & G. J. Alexander. (1998). Investments (6th ed.), Prentice Hall.

Zvi, BodieAlex, Kane., Alan, J. Marcus., Stylianos, Perrakis., & Peter, J. Ryan. (2015). Investments, (8th ed.), McGraw-Hill.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

BSOC191AN - YOUTH AND POPULAR CULTURE (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to address the changing ideas of the conceptualisation of youth in contemporary times in relation to popular culture. It explores the question of the formation of youth identity in popular culture and the debates challenging the dominant idea of youth identity in popular culture through the lens of gender, caste, class and minorities. The course takes up the case study of social media as the particular site mediating popular culture to explore these questions of youth identity formation as usage of social media by young people is increasing especially in countries like India which has one of the highest populations of youth in the world. Popular culture and media are intertwined and social media has emerged as a phenomenon of popular culture which shapes youth identity either by mobilising youth in a powerful way in favour of dominant socio-political norms or social movements which challenge the dominant socio-political trends. In recent times, the participation of youth in electoral politics through social media has multiplied phenomenally in India shaping the nature of engagement of youth with popular culture. The conceptualisation of youth as a democratic dividend has implications for defining the relationship between youth and social media in relation to popular culture. Similarly, conceptualisation of youth as a subculture is constitutive of the relationship between youth and media. Thus, the case study of social media will be linking the theoretical conceptualisations with the empirical phenomena.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Students will be able to define theoretical conceptualisation of youth and its changing nature in the contemporary world in relation to popular culture.

CO2: Students will be able to demonstrate critical understanding with regard to the dominant identity of youth in popular culture

CO3: Students will be able to evaluate the subculture in Indian society.

CO4: Students will be able to critically understand the role of social media in mobilising youth in favour or against the dominant socio-political norms.

CO5: Students will be able to analyse the popular culture through the lens of caste, gender, class and minority.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Conceptual Issues
 

Youth as a Cultural Category

1.2 Youth as Demographic Dividend

1.3 Youth as Democratic Dividend

1.4 Youth as Subculture

 

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
II: Rethinking Youth Identity in Popular Culture
 

2.1 Caste

2.2 Class

2.3 Gender

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
III Case Study - Youth and Social Media ( Case Study)
 

3.1 Social Media, Youth and and Dominant Socio-Political Norms

3.2 Social Media, Youth and Social Movements

Text Books And Reference Books:

Keniston, Kenneth (1970). Youth: A "New" Stage of life. The American Scholar, 39 (4), 631-654.

Chandrasekhar, C. P., J. Ghosh, & A. Roychowdhury. (2006). The 'Demographic Dividend' and Young India's Economic Future’, Economic and Political Weekly, 41 (49), 5055-5064.

James, K. S. (2008). Glorifying Malthus: Current Debate on 'Demographic Dividend' in India.Economic and Political Weekly, 43(25). 63-69.

National Population Policy of India 2000.

Hall, Stuart and Tony Jefferson (1976), (Ed.), Resistance through Rituals: Youth Subcultures in Post-War Britain. Routledge: London & New York. pp. 9-79.

Hebdige D. (1979). Subculture: the Meaning of Style. London: Methuen. pp.1-22.

McRobbie, Angela (1991). Settling Accounts with Subculture: A Feminist Critique. Feminism and Youth Culture, 16-34

Kumar, Vijay. (2020). ‘5 Dalit Artists Challenging Casteism Through Music, Films and Literature’, Feminism in India.com( https://feminisminindia.com/2020/04/15/dalit-artists-challenging-casteism-music-films-literature/ )

Kumar, Nitish. (2021). Social Media, Dalits and Politics of Presence: An Anlalysis of thePresence of Dalit Voices in the Indian Media. Social and Political Research Foundation.( https://sprf.in/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/SPRF-2021_Dalit-Media_Final.pdf )

Mukhopadhyay, S and Mazumdar , S. (2020). ‘Echoing Global Marginalised Voices: A Study of Rap Music in India’, Heritage Times.( https://www.heritagetimes.in/echoing-global-marginalised-voices-a-study-of-rap-music-in-india)

Lukose, Ritty (2005). Consuming Globalization: Youth and Gender in Kerala, India. Journal of Social History. 38 (4), 915-935.

O’Connor, Laura. (2020). ‘Digital Activism and The Increased Role of Dalit Activism inIntersectional Feminism in India’, The Undergraduate Journal of Politics, Policy and Society (UJPPS), Vol. 3, No.1. ( https://www.ujpps.com/index.php/ujpps/article/view/99 )

Kujat, Christopher Norman. (2016). ‘Can the Subaltern Tweet?: A Netnography of India’sSubaltern Voices Entering the Public via Social Media’,http://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:1483945/FULLTEXT01.pdf

Lukose, Ritty (2005). Consuming Globalization: Youth and Gender in Kerala, India. Journal of Social History. 38 (4), 915-935.

O’Connor, Laura. (2020). ‘Digital Activism and The Increased Role of Dalit Activism in Intersectional Feminism in India’, The Undergraduate Journal of Politics, Policy and Society (UJPPS), Vol. 3, No.1. ( https://www.ujpps.com/index.php/ujpps/article/view/99 )

Udupa, Sahana. (2017). ‘Gaali Cultures: The politics of abusive exchange on social media’,New Media & Society 20(4): 1506-1522.

Jamil, Ghazala. (2022). ‘Tech-mediated Misogyny and Communal Vitriol’, Economic andPolitical Weekly, Volume 57, Issue 3.

 Sonkar, Madhulika; Soorma, Ishita and Akanksha, Sreshtha. (2020). ‘Social Media and the Mobilization of Collective Action on Sexual Violence against Women: A Case Study of the ‘#MeToo’ Movement in India’, Vantage: Journal of Thematic Analysis, Volume 1, Issue1.(http://maitreyi.ac.in/Datafiles/cms/2021/vantage%202021%20new/7.%20MeToo%20paper.pdf )

Stephen, Cynthia . (2022). ‘Popular Culture and Caste: The Three Indias’, Economic and PoliticalWeekly. Volume 57, Issue 9.

Kumar, Vijay. (2020). ‘5 Dalit Artists Challenging Casteism Through Music, Films and Literature’, Feminism in India.com ( https://feminisminindia.com/2020/04/15/dalit-artists-challenging-casteism-music-films-literatur

e/ )

Samos, Sumeet. (2021). ‘Dalit Rap is India’s New Musical Vanguard’, Music Opinion.( https://www.frieze.com/article/dalit-rap-indias-new-musical-vanguard ) 

Ingole, Prashant. (2019). ‘Ambedkarite Protest Music and the Making of a “Counter Public”: An Overview’, Indian Cultural Forum.

( https://indianculturalforum.in/2019/10/11/ambedkarite-protest-music-and-the-making-of-a-counter-public/ )

Banaji, Shakuntala. (2014). ‘A Tale of Three Worlds: Young People, Media and Class in India’, LSE Research Online, http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/57563/1/__lse.ac.uk_storage_LIBRARY_Secondary_libfile_shared_repos

itory_Content_Banaji%2C%20S_Tale%20of%20three%20worlds_Banaji%20_Tale%20of%203

%20worlds_2014.pdf

Cohen, P. (1972). Rethinking the Youth Question: Education, Labour and Cultural Studies. Capital & Class, 23(3), 171-173.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Wyn, Johanna and White, Rob. (1997). Rethinking Youth, Allen & Unwin Pty Ltd

Gooptu, Nandini (ed.). 2013. Enterprise Culture in Neoliberal India: Studies in Youth, Class,Work and Media. Routledge

Mead, Margaret. (1928). Coming of Age in Samoa: A Psychological Study of Primitive Youth for West.

Wyn, Johanna and White, Rob. (1997). Rethinking Youth, Allen & Unwin Pty Ltd

Kujat, Christopher Norman. (2016). ‘Can the Subaltern Tweet?: A Netnography of India’sSubaltern Voices Entering the Public via Social Media’,http://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:1483945/FULLTEXT01.pdf

Kumar, Rajesh and Thapa Devam. (2014). ‘Social media as a catalyst for civil societymovements in India: A study in Dehradun city’, New Media & Society. Volume: 17 issue: 8,page(s): 1299-1316.

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment (Nature of CIAs) Weightage

1. Analytical skills and critical thinking: 15

2. Academic Presentation Skills including writing: 15

3. Class Participation 5

4. Attendance 5

Total 50

ENG191AN - INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The course ‘Introduction to Film Studies’ aims at introducing students to the cinema, important trends and genres in world cinema, along with key concepts in film studies. It aims to make participants familiar with some major international cinematic figures and films. It aids in the basic understanding of the field, its vast history, and its role in society. Students receive the chance to enhance the skills required to study Films with reference to art and society. It develops the students’ critical thinking ability that is required for analyzing, criticizing,  and creating quality films.

 Course Objectives:

  • Introduces to the theories, methods, and concerns of film and media studies as a discipline, preparing the students for further work in the field. 
  • Teaches the specific aspects of film style and narrative form through analysis of scenes from the films screened each week and from a range of outside examples. 
  • Equips the students with historical, cultural, and theoretical topics relevant to the films. 
  • Teaches the language of cinema.
  • Trains the students to critically analyze the content.
  • Learns to communicate effectively. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand the language of cinema.

CO2: Can trace out the implied meaning of cinema.

CO3: Understand the making of cinema.

CO4: Critically analyze content effectively.

CO5: Create quality content.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction
 

Art as an Entertainment 

Evolution of cinema 

Impact of theatre and Folk arts 

      Industrial, technological, aesthetic, and cultural development in cinema Establishment of the Film industry and audience 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Language of Cinema
 

What is cinema? Why do we watch films? 

Language of Film- cut, focus, frame, fade, close-up 

Genres 

Images, symbols, colors, narration, gestures, and expression 

Role of individuals in shaping a cinema 

Film Production 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Film Criticism
 

From play to picture- a transformation of expressions into motions 

Good cinema and bad cinema-criteria of assessment 

Believe the unbelievable- cinemas that brought the audience to believe nonexistent elements 

Books, stories, and the songs-the backbone of a successful screenplay Content-the hero of a movie 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Cinematography
 

Innovation in cinematography 

Sound and Lights- the lifeline of a movie 

Cinematic techniques 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Andre Bazin: The Evolution of the Language of Cinema C.S. Venkitsweran, Swayamvaram: Classic Prophecies in Film and Philosophy ed. K Gopinathan 2. Satyajit Ray: What is Wrong with Indian Films 

3. Susan Hayward: Cinema Studies: The Key Concepts 

4. Ronald Abramson “ Structure and Meaning in Cinema in Movies and Methods Ed. Bill Nichols

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 Film Art: An Introduction by David Bordwell & Kristin Thomson 

2. How to Read a Film by James Monaco 

3. Understanding Movies by Louis Giannetti 

4. Filmmaker’s Handbook by Steven Ascher & Edward Pincus 

5. Grammar of the Shot by Roy Thompson & Christopher J. Bowen 

6. Grammar of the Editing by Roy Thompson & Christopher J. Bowen 

7. History of Narrative Film by David A. Cook 

Evaluation Pattern

Assessment:

Assessment (Nature of CIAs) Weightage

Presentation- 20

Analysis of Content- 20

Class Participation- 05

Attendance- 05



 

Total- 50

ENG191BN - DIGITAL HUMANITIES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

This course is designed to introduce the young students to the emerging field of Digital Humanities and its wide array of scope, research and academic engagements in the field of Arts and Humanities through incorporation of examples and case studies. Digitalisation is a product of the modern mechanised society; it has come to be accepted as an indispensable part of our lives today. Its use in the field of Humanities is a very recent development, with major contributions to documentation, preservation and ushering in a multidimensional interdisciplinary approach to our study, for sources ranging from audio-visual nature to textual work. 

 

Course Objectives:

The students will be acquainted to many existing arguments in the area of Digital Humanities in the last few decades while examining the aid of digital tools in literary and cultural studies. The students will learn to create a sample of their own by replicating any existing digital artifact. The students will be able to identify Digital Humanities as an interdisciplinary field of study through case studies and comparative analysis.

Learning Outcome

CO1: learn to document, preserve and catalogue any content

CO2: understand digital as a cite of knowledge production and preservation

CO3: treat audio-visual sources as necessary tools for research study

CO4: efficient use of machine/digital in day-to-day life

CO5: acknowledge Digital Humanities as a field of immense potential for generating information

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction: Digital Humanities
 

1.1 Digital Humanities: From Inception to the Present

1.2 Theorists and Major Thinkers

1.3 Digital Tools: Documentation as Knowledge Production

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
Archiving in Digital Humanities
 

2.1 Archiving Art and Culture: Preservation through Audio-Visual Medium

2.2 Archiving Literature: Digital Repository, Transcreation and Adaptation

2.3 Archiving Language: Machine Translation, Text-o-Speech and Subtitling 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Cohen, Dan and Roy Rosenzweig. Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web. University of Pennsylvania Press. 2005.

Gleick, James. The Information: A History, A Theory, A Flood. Pantheon. 2011.

Gold, Matthew. Debates in the Digital Humanities. University of Minnesota Press. 2013.

Ramsay, Stephen. Reading Machines: Toward an Algorithmic Criticism. University of Illinois Press. 2011.

Schreibman, Susan, Ray Siemens, and John Unsworth (eds.). A Companion to Digital Humanities. Oxford. 2004.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cohen, Daniel J., et al. “Interchange: The Promise of Digital History.” The Journal of American History, vol. 95, no. 2, 2008, pp. 452–491. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/25095630. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021. 

EARHART, AMY E. “Can We Trust the University?: Digital Humanities Collaborations with Historically Exploited Cultural Communities.” Bodies of Information: Intersectional Feminism and the Digital Humanities, edited by Elizabeth Losh and Jacqueline Wernimont, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2018, pp. 369–390. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctv9hj9r9.23. Accessed 8 Aug. 2021. 

Huggett, Jeremy. “Core or Periphery? Digital Humanities from an Archaeological Perspective.” Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, vol. 37, no. 3 (141), 2012, pp. 86–105. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/41636599. Accessed 9 Aug. 2021.

KIRSCHENBAUM, MATTHEW. “What Is Digital Humanities and What’s It Doing in English Departments?” Debates in the Digital Humanities, edited by Matthew K. Gold, NED - New edition ed., University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2012, pp. 3–11. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttv8hq.4. Accessed 11 Aug. 2021.

Lindquist, Thea, et al. “Advancing Digital Humanities at CU-Boulder through Evidence-Based Service Design.” Laying the Foundation: Digital Humanities in Academic Libraries, edited by John W. White and Heather Gilbert, vol. 7, Purdue University Press, West Lafayette, Indiana, 2016, pp. 127–148. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt163t7kq.11. Accessed 9 Aug. 2021. 

LOSH, ELIZABETH, et al. “Putting the Human Back into the Digital Humanities: Feminism, Generosity, and Mess.” Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016, edited by Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2016, pp. 92–103. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctt1cn6thb.13. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021. 

McPherson, Tara. “Introduction: Media Studies and the Digital Humanities.” Cinema Journal, vol. 48, no. 2, 2009, pp. 119–123. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/20484452. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021. 

ROBERTSON, STEPHEN. “The Differences between Digital Humanities and Digital History.” Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016, edited by Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2016, pp. 289–307. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctt1cn6thb.28. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021. 

RUBERG, BONNIE, et al. “Toward a Queer Digital Humanities.” Bodies of Information: Intersectional Feminism and the Digital Humanities, edited by Elizabeth Losh and Jacqueline Wernimont, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2018 , pp. 108128. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctv9hj9r9.11. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021.

Sharpe, Celeste Tu´ò´ng Vy, and Timothy B. Powell. “Making Digital Humanities Tools More Culturally Specific and More Culturally Sensitive.” Teaching with Digital Hum anities: Tools and Methods for NineteenthCentury American Literature, edited by Jennifer Travis and Jessica DeSpain, University of Illinois Press, Urbana, Chicago; Springfield, 2018, pp. 167184. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctv8bt13m.16. Accesse d 10 Aug. 2021.

Tolbert, Jeffrey A., and Eric D. M. Johnson. “Digital Folkloristics: Text, Ethnography, and Interdisciplinarity.” Western Folklore, vol. 78, no. 4, 2019, pp. 327356. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/26864167. Accessed 8 Aug. 2021.

Viscomi, Jose ph. “Digital Facsimiles: Reading the William Blake Archive.” Computers and the Humanities, vol. 36, no. 1, 2002, pp. 2748. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/30204695. Accessed 8 Aug. 2021.

WARD, MEGAN, and ADRIAN S. WISNICKI. “The Archive after Theory.” Debates in the Digital Humanities 2019, edited by Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2019, pp. 20010 Aug. 2021. Evaluation Pattern CIA ICIA II Blog Writing Project (15 Marks) : Archival Report 206. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctvg251hk.21. AccesseD 10 Aug. 2021

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I- Blog Writing 

CIA II- Project: Archival Report 

SDEC111N - SKILL DEVELOPMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course intends to facilitate coexistence in a rapidly changing world characterised by diversity and exponential new development in social structure. The course aims creates ability to practice harmonious living and develop necessary skills to enrich each other in society. The skills covered will be: Social adaptability, Environmental adaptability, Legal adaptability.

 

Course Objectives

  • To inculcate in students the spirit of social tolerance, political responsibility and compassion towards different sections of the society.
  • To create awareness among students about the various pertinent laws of the land they should be aware of as responsible citizens and the consequences of their violations.
  • To sensitize the students towards environmental issues and encourage them to think of sustainable alternative solutions.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: More aware about their duties and responsibilities towards their society and fellow beings and will be able to assess the impact and consequences of their actions on the society.

CO2: Able to understand the procedures to file FIRs and RTIs, applying for their driving licenses, PAN card, VISA and other legal documentations.

CO3: Able to understand and exercise their rights and duties better and will have the knowhow of what to be done during the time of emergencies.

CO4: Possessing the skills to examine environmental problems with a critical approach and will be able to develop sustainable models to help resolve an environmental issue.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Social Adaptability
 

Social tolerance: Cultural acceptance, Political acceptance, Acceptance of all communities - gender and gender preferences, Linguistic acceptance; Political responsibility: Duties as a responsible citizen, Importance of participating in elections, Safeguarding of Public property; Community Service; Safety of fellow beings: social safety, road safety, women safety, health and hygiene.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Legal Adaptability
 

Legal Adaptability (10 Hrs)

Common Legal Knowledge: Relationships – Consent, Dominance, Privacy; Alcohol and drugs - Illegal products, Narcotics Act, Respecting organizations, Legal age; Ragging and bullying; Legal repercussions of proxies; Dress code; Respecting other genders.Student Community: Laws related to residence; Driving License, Aadhar, Visa, Passport; Public transport; Sexual harassment; Emergency services. International students; Support systems; Laws in academia.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Environmental Adaptability
 

Reduction in the use of plastics; reduction in urban air and noise pollution; Cleaning water bodies.

Text Books And Reference Books:

NA

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

·      

Assessment Component

Description

Weightage

CIA I

Exhibition

35%

 

Unit 1.

 

CIA II

Individual Assignment (CIA 2)

30%

 

Unit 2

 

CIA III

Presentation and Activity

35%

 

Unit 3

 

 

Total

100%

BENG221N - ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION II (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

English Language and Composition is an intensive program for two semesters for all the students of the BA/BSc programmes (ENGH, EPH, ECOH, JOUH, PSYH, MEP) that introduces students to a wide range of expository works in order to develop their knowledge of rhetoric and make them aware of the power of language. The course is designed to meet the rigorous requirements of a graduate-level courses and therefore includes expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and historical contexts. It would provide students with the opportunity to work with the rhetorical situation, examining the authors’ purposes as well as the audiences and the subjects in texts.

The purpose of the course is to enable students to read analytically, formulate arguments based on the readings, and respond by composing articulate essays that utilise advanced elements of sentence structure, syntax, style, purpose, and tone. Thus, by the use of rhetorical principles, students will learn how to become critical thinkers and apply that knowledge to their writing by revising and improving their essays, as well as critiquing and editing peer essays. In addition, students will be required to thoroughly research relevant topics, synthesise information from a variety of sources, and document their knowledge in a cogent well-written report. Also, as the course is designed to engage students with rhetoric in multiple mediums, including visual media such as photographs, films, advertisements, comic strips, music videos, and TED talks; students would develop a sense to comprehend how the resource of language operates in any given text.

While the first semester focuses on understanding principles of rhetoric through multiple texts, the second semester is more thematic in nature familiarising students with texts from multiple disciplines, especially in the context of India. The skills acquired in the first semester would help students to critically engage with rhetoric within the context of contemporary India and critically respond to the same.

As part of the course, students are expected to maintain a writing journal to monitor their progress in writing.

Course Objectives

       To critically engage with a variety of texts on multiple themes from different disciplines.

       Familiarise students with different kinds of rhetoric produced in the Indian context.

       Apply the Rhetoric techniques learned in the first semester while engaging with thematic texts.

       Demonstrate understanding and mastery of the English Language as well as stylistic maturity in their own writings

       Engage in critical writing on a variety of socio-political issues.

       To enable students to be aware of the politics behind knowledge production.

       Write on multiple themes for various purposes.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Analyse and interpret samples of good writing by identifying and explaining an author?s use of rhetorical strategies and techniques.

CO2: Communicate effectively in a different medium by developing their LSRW skills.

CO3: Analyze both visual and written texts.

CO4: Apply effective strategies and techniques in their own writing.

CO5: Create and sustain arguments based on reading, research, and/or personal experience, especially in the Indian context.

CO6: Demonstrate understanding and mastery of the English Language as well as stylistic maturity in their own writings.

CO7: Produce expository, analytical, and argumentative compositions that introduce a complex central idea and develop it with appropriate evidence drawn from primary and/or secondary source material, cogent explanations, and clear transitions.

CO8: Move effectively through the stages of the writing process with careful attention to inquiry and research, drafting, revising, editing, and review.

CO9: Write thoughtfully about their own process of composition.

CO10: Revise a work to make it suitable for a different audience

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
The Question of Knowledge: The Education System
 

1.     Rethinking Education: Why Education System is Ripe for Disruption by Naveen Jain. https://www.forbes.com/sites/naveenjain/2013/03/24/disrupting-education/#3721fe4523ef

 

2.     Sherman Alexe’s Superman and Me http://www.umsl.edu/~alexanderjm/SupermanandMebyAlexie.pdf

 

3.     For the Record: Dear Minister.

 

http://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/columns/satyapal-singh-darwin-evolution-theory-scientists-pm-modi-dear-minister-5035204/

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Individual and Society
 

1.     “Go Kiss the World” by Subrotobagchihttp://subrotobagchi.mindtree.com/iim-bangalore-speech/

 

2.      Sky Baba Vegetarians Only. http://www.anveshi.org.in/vegetarians-only-a-short-story-by-sky-baba/

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Economy and Materialism
 

1.     Shashi Tharoor’s speech in Oxford. http://www.ibtimes.co.in/shashi-tharoor-garners-appreciation-his-spirited-argument-oxford-union-debate-full-text-640299

2.     On Anti- National Economics by Jayanthi Gosh.

http://www.frontline.in/columns/Jayati_Ghosh/antinational-economics/article8356541.ece

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Society and Social Issues (Gender/ environment/ class/ caste)
 

1.     Gandhian In Gerwhal

 

2.     Ramachandra Guha. When eleven women of Bengal Took on Gaandhihttp://ramachandraguha.in/archives/when-eleven-women-of-bengal-took-on-gandhi-the-telegraph.html

 

3.     Caste Culture at IIT Madras by Anjatha Subrmaninan. http://www.openthemagazine.com/article/open-essay/an-anatomy-of-the-caste-culture-at-iit-madras.

 

Politics of Intimate

 

4.     https://medium.com/@pallavirao84/politics-of-the-intimate-pt-3-the-brahmin-mistress-and-the-bahujan-maid-6becf6e2fbcb

 

5.     Hangwoman by K. R Meera.

 

6.     Swara Bhaskar’s letter.

 

https://thewire.in/218456/end-magnum-opus-i-felt-reduced-vagina/

 

7.     Is brown man a Racist by Chandra Bhan Prasad

 

http://www.india-seminar.com/2006/558/558%20chandra%20bhan%20prasad.html

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Sports and the World
 

1.     Vadivaasal Novella 

2.     Sports women or victim of sexual assault: Dreams Die fast in Haryana. http://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/haryana-rapes-sportswoman-police-ml-khattar-sexual-assault-5034854/

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Politics and Propaganda
 

1.     Who is Afraid of Caricature by S. PrassannaRajanhttp://www.openthemagazine.com/article/locomotif/who-s-afraid-of-a-caricature

 

2.     Politics as Costume Drama by Sunanda K Datta Ray.

 

http://www.openthemagazine.com/article/open-essay/politics-as-costume-drama

 

3.     Net Neutrality and Freedom of expressions by Karan Lihari and Chtanyabalkrishnan

 

http://www.openthemagazine.com/article/open-essay/net-neutrality-the-net-worth-of-freedom

 

4.     The State and The Selfie. By Suchitra Vijayan http://www.suchitravijayan.com/archives/396

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
The politics of Language
 

1.     How a Bihari Lost his mother Tongue to Hindi by Roshan Kishore http://www.livemint.com/Leisure/Nl73WC1JA8d6KVybBycNlM/How-a-Bihari-lost-his-mother-tongue-to-Hindi.html

2.  Hail English, The Dalit Goddess by Chandra Bhan Prasad

 

   http://www.anveshi.org.in/hail-english-the-dalit-goddess/

Text Books And Reference Books:

Compilation 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Compilation 

Evaluation Pattern

This is a submission-based course with all assessments designed to evaluate the student’s ability to read, generate and critique rhetoric in language use. The assessments would be designed and shared with students at the beginning of the semester by respective course instructors.

CIA 1: 20 marks

CIA 2: MSE Submission 50 Marks

CIA 3: 20 Marks

ESE: Submission 50 mark

BSEH231N - PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course is designed to give a systematic school-wise introduction to mainstream approaches to the study of macroeconomics. The course begins by introducing students to the various important macroeconomic variables and its measurement technique. Then the course proceeds on a systematic introduction to the important macroeconomic theory adopting a chronological school- wise pattern; beginning from the Classicals to the Keynesians, Monetarists, New Classicals and New Keynesians. It has been designed in such a way that it stimulates awareness on the evolution; critiques and debates in the mainstream macroeconomic thought and provided insights into macroeconomic challenges and policy management in progressive nations. It is also intended that this course will develop the ability for objective reasoning about macroeconomic issues.

Course Objectives

  • To introduce to the students the basic principles of macroeconomic theory.
  • To enable the students to understand the characteristics of major macroeconomic variables.
  • To provide a vivid understanding to students on the evolution of macroeconomic thought.
  • To equip students to analyse the dynamic interactions between the major macroeconomic variables.

Learning Outcome

CO1: The students will be acquainted with the mainstream approaches to the study of macroeconomics.

CO2: The students will be able to distinguish between the various approaches and the merits and critiques of each of them.

CO3: The students will acquire the ability to understand the dynamic interactions between the macroeconomic variables and their impact on the economy.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Macroeconomics and Measurement of Macroeconomic Variables
 

Nature and scope of macroeconomics; meaning and definition of key macroeconomic variables; Central questions in Macroeconomics; National Income Accounts: GDP – National Income – Personal and Disposable Personal Income; National Income Accounting Identities, Issues in National Income Accounting; Cost of Living Index: GDP deflator, WPI, CPI, Core Inflation; Measures of Cyclical Variation in Output.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
The Classical Macroeconomics
 

The Classical Revolution; Wage, Employment and Production; Equilibrium Output and Employment; Quantity theory of Money; The Classical Theory of the Interest Rate; Policy Implications of Classical Equilibrium Model.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
The Keynesian System
 

The Problem of Unemployment; the Simple Keynesian Model: Equilibrium Output, Components of Aggregate Demand, Equilibrium Income; the role of Fiscal Policy and Multiplier; Exports and Imports in the Simple Keynesian Model; Interest rates and Aggregate demand; Keynesian Theory of the Interest Rate; Money supply and Money demand in Keynesian framework.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
The Monetarist Counterrevolution
 

The reformulation of the Quantity theory of Money; Fiscal and Monetary Policy: Monetarists versus Keynesians; Unstable velocity and declining policy influence of Monetarism.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Macroeconomic Theory after Keynes
 

The New Classical Position: Keynesian Counter-critique, Rational Expectations Hypothesis; Business Cycle Theories: Multiplier-Accelerator Interaction Model, Real Business Cycle Theory, Political Business Cycle Model; New Keynesian Economics: Menu Cost Theory, Efficient-Wage Theory, Insider-Outsider Model and Hysteresis.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:15
Microeconomic Foundations of Macroeconomics
 

Consumption: Keynesian Consumption Function, Kuznets‘s Consumption Puzzle, Fischer’s theory of Intertemporal Choice, Modigliani’s Life Cycle Hypothesis, Friedman’s Permanent Income Hypothesis, Random walk model of Consumption expenditure; Investment: The Neoclassical Theory of Investment; Residential Investment; The Accelerator Theory of Investment; The Stock Market and Tobin‘s Q Theory; Efficient Market Hypothesis; Policies affecting Investment.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Dornbusch, R.., Fischer, S.., & Startz, R. (2015). Macroeconomics. (11th ed.). McGraw Hill Education.
  2. Froyen, R. (2014). Macroeconomics: Theories and Policies (10th ed.). Pearson Education.
  3. Mankiw, N. G. (2015). Macroeconomics (9th ed.). USA: Worth Publishers.
  4. McConnell, C. R., & Brue, S. L. (2011). Macroeconomics, Principles, Problems and Policies. New York: McGraw Hill Inc.
  5. Snowden, B. & Vane, H. R. (2005). Modern Macroeconomics: Its Origins, Development and Current State. United Kingdom: Edward Elgar Publishing.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Abel, A. B. & Bernanke, B. S. (2011). Macroeconomics (7th ed.). USA: Pearson Education.
  2. Blanchard, O. (2009). Macroeconomics (5th ed.). USA: Pearson Education Inc.
  3. Blaug, M. (1968). Economic Theory in Retrospect (2nd ed.). London: Heinemann Educational Books. Cate, T. (2012). Keynes’ General Theory: Seventy Five Years Later. United Kingdom: Edward Elgar Publishing.
  4. Mishkin, F. S. (2016). Macroeconomics: Policy & Practice (2nd ed.). United States: Pearson Education. Samuelson, P. A., & Nordhaus, W. D. (2005). Economics (18th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.
  5. Schiller, B. & Gebhardt, K. (2011). The Macroeconomy Today (11th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill. Sheffrin, S. M. (1996). Rational Expectations (2nd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern 

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

 

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam ** End Semester Exam

BSEH232N - MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS-II (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is the second part of a compulsory two-course sequence. This part is to be taught in Semester II following the first part in Semester I. The course gives an introduction into differential equation, linear algebra, derivatives and application using calculus.

Learning Outcome

CO1: The students will be able to apply mathematical techniques and models for the deeper understanding of economics, especially the branches of microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics.

CO2: A central aim to this course is to increase "mathematical maturity", confidence and familiarity with the types of problems that students will encounter and built upon later.On successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Use appropriate techniques to solve problems with calculus and linear algebra. Model economic questions as mathematical problems. To apply mathematical techniques to economic theory in general.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Elements of Linear Algebra - I
 

Vectors; Vector Spaces; Linear Dependency; A Matrix; Matrix Operations: Addition, Subtraction, Scalar Multiplication and Multiplication; Laws of Matrix Algebra: Commutative, Associative and Distributive; Matrix expression of a System of Linear Equations. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Elements of Linear Algebra - II
 

Determinants; Rank of a Matrix; Minors, Cofactors, Adjoint and Inverse Matrices; Laplace Expansion; Solving Linear Equations with the Inverse; Cramer’s Rule for Matrix Solutions; Input-Output Analysis using Matrices. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Integral Calculus
 

Integration; Indefinite and Definite Integral; Riemann integral; Numerical methods of evaluating the integral; Fundamental Theorem of the Calculus; Rules of Integration; Integration by substitution; Integration by Parts; Area between Curves; Improper Integrals; L’Hôpital’s Rule; Multiple Integrals; Application of Integral Calculus in Economics: Revenue and Cost Curves, Consumers’ and Producers’ Surplus, Market Equilibrium, Growth, Domar’s model of Public Debt. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:20
Differential Equations
 

Introduction to Differential Equations: Definitions and Concepts; First-Order Differential Equations; Integrating factors and Rules; Variables separable case; Differential Equation with Homogenous Coefficients; Exact Differential Equations; Second-order Differential Equations; Application in Economics: Dynamic Stability in Microeconomic models, Growth path, Domar’s Capital expansion model.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:20
Difference Equations
 

Introduction to Difference Equations: Definitions and Concepts; Finite differences; Homogeneous linear difference equation with constant coefficients; Solutions for Non-homogeneous linear equations; Linear First-Order Difference Equations; Linear Second-Order Difference Equations with constant coefficients; Stability Conditions; Application in Economics: Interaction between Multiplier and Acceleration Principle, The Cobweb Model, Harrod-Domar Growth Model.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Chiang, A.C. & Wainwright, K.  (2013). Fundamental Methods of Mathematical Economics. (4th ed.). McGraw Hill Education (India) Private Limited.
  2. Renshaw, G. (2011). Maths for Economics. (4th ed.).  Oxford. Oxford University Press.
  3. Sydsaeter, K. &   Hammond, P. (2016). Mathematics for Economic Analysis. New Delhi: Pearson Education Inc.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Bradley, T.  (2013). Essential Mathematics for Economics and Business. United Kingdom: John Wiley & Sons.
  2. Dowling, E.  T. (2012). Schaum’s Outlines-Introduction to Mathematical Economics. (3rd ed.).  New York: McGraw Hill.
  3. Roser, M. (2003). Basic Mathematics for Economists. (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge.
Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

BSEH233N - STATISTICS FOR ECONOMICS-I (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This is a course on statistical methods for economics I, begins with some basic concepts and terminology that are fundamental to statistical analysis and inference. Then a detailed description on descriptive statistics starting from measures of central tendency to skewness and kurtosis.  A separate module has been devoted to deal with identifying nature and extend of relationship between variables (correlation and regression analysis) followed by time series statistics.  Finally, this course ends with indices, as it is very essential for every economics student to understand the construction and problems involving in constructing macro level indices like CPI and WPI.

Learning Outcome

CO1 : To provide an understanding of the concepts and methods of Statistics, for application in data analysis.

CO2: To get statistical skill required for the analysis of socio-economic data.

CO3: To provide hands-on training in data analysis (along with computer applications).

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction and Overview
 

Meaning; Scope of statistics; Importance and limitation of statistics Collection of Data: Planning and organizing a statistical enquiry; Methods of collecting primary data; Sources of secondary data; Sampling: Census method vs. sample method; Classification of data: Meaning, methods of classification; Tabulation of data: meaning, role, parts of a table; General rules of tabulation; Presentation of data; Diagrams and graphs: General rules for construction a diagram; Types of diagrams; Types of graphs; Software Applications.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion
 

Measures of Central Tendency:Mean, median and mode; Geometric and Harmonic means; Measures of Dispersion: Range, inter-quartile range and quartile deviation, mean deviation, standard deviation and Lorenz curve, Moments, Skewness and Kurtosis; Partition Values: Quartiles; deciles; percentiles; Software applications.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Correlation and Linear Regression Model
 

Correlation Analysis: Meaning, types of correlation; Methods of studying correlation: Scatter diagram method, Karl Pearson’s co-efficient of correlation, Spearman’s rank method, concurrent deviation method; Testing the significance of the correlation coefficient; Method of least squares: Introduction, estimation,  the standard error of estimate, the coefficient of determination, properties of an OLS estimator.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Time Series Statistics
 

Measurement of Secular trend: Free hand curve method or eye inspection method - Semi average method; Method of moving average; Method of least squares.  Measurement of seasonal variations: Method of simple averages; Ratio to trend method; Ratio to moving average method; Link relative method.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Index Numbers
 

Meaning and importance; problems in the construction of index numbers; Types of index numbers: price index; quantity index; value index; construction of price index numbers: unweighted and weighted indices (Lasperyre’s index, Paasche’s index, Fishers ideal index); construction of quantity and value indices; tests of index numbers: Time reversal test; Factor reversal test; Splicing: Deflating process; Consumer Price Index (CPI): meaning and uses; problems in the construction of cost of living index; Methods of constructing cost of living index: Aggregate expenditure and family budget methods; Limitations of index numbers; Software applications.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Anderson, D. R., Sweeney, D. J., Williams, T. A., Camm, J. D., & Cochran, J. J. (2014). Essentials of Statistics for Business and Economics. Boston: Cengage Learning.

Lind, D. A., Waite, C. A., Marchal, W. G., &Wathen, S. A. (2005). Basic Statistics for Business & Economics. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Sharma, J. K. (2010). Fundamentals of Business Statistics. (2nd ed.). New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Croxton, F. E., & Cowden, D. J. (1964). Applied General Statistics. (2nd ed.). New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India Private Limited.

Freund, J. E., & Perles, B. M. (2007). Modern Elementary Statistics. (12th ed.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Gupta, S. C., & Kapoor, V. K. (2007). Fundamentals of Applied Statistics. (4th ed.).  New Delhi: Sultan Chand & Sons.

Larsen, R. J., & Marx, M. L. (2012). An Introduction to Mathematical Statistics and its Applications. (5th ed.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-I=20%

CIA-II(MSE)=25%

CIA-III=20%

ESE=30%

Attendance = 5%

EVS211N - ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:0
No of Lecture Hours/Week:0
Max Marks:50
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Self study course, As per instructions given by exam office.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Self study course, As per instructions given by exam office.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:0
Self study course, As per instructions given by exam office.
 

Self study course, As per instructions given by exam office.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Self study course, As per instructions given by exam office.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Self study course, As per instructions given by exam office.

Evaluation Pattern

Self study course, As per instructions given by exam office.

SDEC212N - SKILL DEVELOPMENT (2022 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims to impart effective academic writing and communication skills. Under this training shall be provided on building personal brand, personal statement writing, public speaking skills, mind mapping, decision making skills and deductive reasoning, visual presentation skills, quality control, note taking skills, critical analysis writing, SOP, article analysis, writing argumentative essays, resume writing, cover letters, job finding through online portal, group discussion skills and panel discussion.

 Along with these, professional skills will also be imparted such as paper presentation for conferences, delivering formal presentation, professional communication, professional code of conduct, professional letter writing, profession email writing and appearing for job interviews.

All the courses are provided in collaboration with Centre for Academic and Professional Support, CHRIST (Deemed to be University).

Psychometric Assessment and Socio- Psychological Education for Students.

Learning Outcome

CO1: The programme will help students in assessing sleep quality, eating habits, Academic stress and procrastination, learning Styles, emotional intelligence behaviour addiction, comprehensive interest styles personality types.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:0
N/A
 

N/A

Text Books And Reference Books:

As per teacher

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

According to the instructor

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I 35 %

CIA II 30 %

CIA III 35 %

Attendance 05

 Total 100

BSEH322N - ACCOUNTING FOR DECISION MAKING - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Students will learn how accounting supports economic decision-making and provides value to entities and society. As a prerequisite, students should have basic knowledge of Accountancy.

Course Objectives:

  • Prepare accounts for the businesses with different branches and different types of organisation and
  • Create books as per double entry system, when information based on single entry system is provided

Learning Outcome

CO1: To understand the concept of accounting according to national and International standard.

CO2: To have a basic and conceptual understanding of company accounts and also be able to prepare final accounts of a company.

CO3: To have a basic understanding of shareholder?s equity and liabilities and its accounts.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Accounting system: (Basic and Conceptual)
 

Nature and Purpose of Accounting; Financial Accounting Framework – Accounting as a language, Users of Accounting Information; Generally Accepted Accounting Principles; Basis of Accounting; Cash basis and Accrual basis. The nature of Financial Accounting Principles – Basic Concepts and Conventions: Entity, Money Measurement, Going Concern, Cost, Realization, Accruals, Periodicity, Consistency, Prudence (Conservatism), Materiality and Full Disclosures. Financial Accounting Standards: concept, benefits, procedure for issuing Accounting Standards in India. Salient features of Accounting Standard (AS): 1 (ICAI). Introduction to international financial reporting standards (IFRS).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Double entry Book Keeping (Conceptual and Analytical)
 

Capital and Revenue

Capital and revenue expenditures, Capital and revenue receipts, Contingent assets and contingent liabilities.

Inventories

Basis of inventory valuation and record keeping. Depreciation accounting Methods, computation and accounting treatment of depreciation, Change in depreciation methods

Final Accounts of Sole Proprietor 

Data Entry in the primary and secondary books of accounts - Preparation of Trial Balance. Fundamental errors including rectifications thereof. Preparation of Final Accounts (Sole Trader); Trading and Profit and Loss account, Balance Sheet.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Company Accounts (Conceptual and Analytical)
 

Issue of shares and debentures, forfeiture of shares, re-issue of forfeited shares(Simple problems) redemption of preference shares(Theory only)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Shareholders Equity and Liabilities: (Conceptual)
 

Components of Shareholders’ Equity; Accounting for Share Capital; Reserves & Surplus; Bonus; Dividends; Statement of Changes in Equity; Earnings Per Share. Liabilities-meaning, Classification of Liabilities - Current, Long-Term Liabilities, Contingent Liabilities, Off balance sheet financing, Deferred taxes, Main provisions of relevant Indian Accounting Standard.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:17
Preparation of Final Accounts of Company (Analytical)
 

Legal position regarding final accounts of companies – Compliance with Accounting standards- Form and contents of Statement of Profit or Loss and Balance Sheet as per SCHEDULE III – General Instructions for preparation of Statement of Profit and Loss and Balance Sheet – Disposal of company profits –dividend tax deducted at Source-Declaration of dividends out of Reserves-Transfer to Reserves etc., excluding calculation of managerial remuneration.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Jain &Narang, (2016). Financial Accounting. Mumbai: Kalyani.

Gupta, R.L., &Radhaswamy, M., (2016) Financial Accounting (18ed.). New Delhi: Sultan Chand & Sons.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Maheswari S. N. &Maheswari S. K. (2017). Advanced accountancy. New Delhi: Vikas

Shukla M. C. & Grewall T. S. (2017). Advanced accountancy (15 Ed.). New Delhi: S. Chand

Evaluation Pattern

EvaluationPattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

 CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

5

* Mid Semester Exam ** End Semester Exam

BSEH323N - COMPUTER APPLICATIONS FOR ECONOMIC ANALYSIS - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to the various three important softwares highly used in economic analysis especially Quantitative/Qualitative data analysis. The course begins with an introduction to MS Excel, managing data in MS Excel and doing basic statistical analysis using MS Excel. Then the course will introduce students to more widely used statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) and provide hands on training on how to deal with cross sectional data base. A separate module has also been included for Qualitative data analysis using Nvivo data editor to make students get exposure to deal with qualitative data base.   

The major objectives of this course are

 

  • To provide hands on training to students on basic quantitative/qualitative data analysis
  • To enhance the technological skills of the students by introducing them to popular data analysis software such as SPSS and Nvivo.
  • To ensure that students have sufficient skills to carry out independent data analysis

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: get hands-on experience in quantitative/qualitative data analysis

CO2: carry out independent research using qualitative data

CO3: get opportunities to practice the theories learnt in Statistics and Econometrics, there by enhance and concrete their understanding of the subject.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Basics of Excel
 

Introduction to MS Excel: Excel Worksheet, the Ribbon, Tool Bar, Creating file, Formatting Cells, Basic Maths; Introduction to formula: formula anatomy, Math functions, Basic Statistics, Logical functions; Data tabulation: sorting, filtering; Graphical representation of data: column, bar, pie, line, area charts.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Statistical Analysis using Excel
 

Pivot tables; Descriptive Statistics; Histogram; Data Analysis: ANOVA; F-test; t-test; z-test; Correlation; Covariance and Regression.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Data Analysis using SPSS - I
 

Introduction to SPSS: Theoretical background of statistics; creating a new file; opening a file; data setup; reverse coding;  selecting cases; splitting a file; graphical representation of data: creating graphs and carts using chart builder.  Parametric tests: ‘t’ test: One sample t test;  independent t test; paired sample t test.  Analysis of variance (ANOVA).  Non-parametric tests: Introduction to non-parametric tests;  Chi-square test;  Mann-Whitney test;  Wilcoxon test;  Kruskal-Wallis test;  Friedman’s ANOVA.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Data Analysis using SPSS - II
 

Correlation: Simple correlation; Multiple correlation; Partial correlation. Regression: Simple linear and multiple linear regression model; Binary logistic model; Multinomial logistic model; Probit model.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
NVivo - I
 

NVivo and qualitative research; What methodologies does NVivo support? Create a new project; Open a project; Importing various types of data; Source classifications, Literature reviews in NVivo, Creating externals for the things you cannot import

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:15
NVivo - II
 

Coding and making nodes; Memos, annotations and links; Summarize your data in framework matrices; Use queries for text analysis; Use queries to explore your coding; Visualize your project: Display your data in charts; Create models and graphs to visualize connections; Work with tree maps and cluster analysis diagrams

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bazeley, P., & Jackson, K. (Eds.). (2013). Qualitative Data Analysis with NVivo. London: Sage Publications Limited.

Field, A. (2009). Discovering Statistics using SPSS. London: Sage publications.

Gibbs, G. R. (2002). Qualitative Data Analysis: Explorations with NVivo. Buckingham: Open University Press.

Hall.

Levine, D. M. (2005). Statistics for Managers Using Microsoft Excel (5th ed.). New York: Prentice

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Anderson, D. R., Sweeney, D. J., Williams, T. A., Camm, J. D., & Cochran, J. J. (2014). Essentials of Statistics for Business and Economics. Boston: Cengage Learning.

Di Gregorio, S. (2000, September). Using Nvivo for your literature review. In strategies in qualitative research: issues and results from analysis using QSR NVIVO and NUD* 1st conference, Institute of Education, London.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation

Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

 

Examination

Method of assessment

CIA 1, MSE and CIA3

Practical exam

ESE

Submission paper

Note: An analytical research article is expected from students using the computer applications taught in the class.

BSEH331N - INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description 

The course is designed to provide a sound training in microeconomic theory to formally analyze the behaviour of individual agents. Since students are already familiar with the quantitative techniques in the previous semesters, mathematical tools are used to facilitate understanding of the basic concepts. This course looks at the behaviour of the consumer and the producer and covers the behaviour of a competitive firm, general equilibrium, imperfect markets and topics under information economics.

 

Course Objectives

·      To develop the ability to distinguish between the strengths and limitations of practical based study of measuring economic units.

·      To impart skills to work independently, to plan and carryout a small-scale research project.

·      It provides the student a strong foundation in applications macroeconomics and helps in understanding the policy implications in emerging economies.

·      It helps in understanding the contribution of various Micro-Economic concepts and in evaluating their policy prescriptions.

Learning Outcome

CO1: It provides the student a strong foundation in applications of microeconomic theory and to understand the dynamic relationship of microeconomic variables/aspects.

CO2: It helps in understanding the implication of microeconomic foundations on the macroeconomic policies.

CO3: It enables the student to evaluate the pros and cons of different microeconomic relations in real situations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:22
Consumer Theory
 

Preferences: Consumer Preferences, assumptions about preferences; Indifference Curves:  Well-behaved preferences; The Marginal Rate of Substitution, other interpretations of the MRS, behaviour of the MRS; Utility: Cardinal Utility, constructing an utility function, indifference curves from utility; Marginal utility (MU): Marginal utility and MRS, The n-good case;  Indirect utility function, expenditure minimization; Budget constraint: Properties of the budget set; Slutsky equation: Substitution effect, income Effect; Change in demand,  rates of change, law of demand; Compensated demand curves; Choice under risk: Contingent consumption, functions and probabilities, expected utility function; The Von Neumann-Morgenstern theorem, risk aversion, risk spreading.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:16
Production, Costs and Perfect Competition
 

Production Functions: Inputs and Outputs, Describing Technological Constraints, Properties of Technology, The Marginal Product, Variations in One Input, Isoquant Maps and the Rate of Technical Substitution, Returns to Scale, The Elasticity of Substitution, Some Common Production Functions, Technical Progress; Cost: Cost-Minimizing Input Choices, Cost Functions, Changes in Input Prices, Change in the Price of One Input, Short-Run, Long-Run Distinction;

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:22
Market Structure and Game Theory
 

Perfect competition: Profit Maximization, Marginal Revenue, Short-Run Supply by a Price-Taking Firm, Profit Maximization and Input Demand, Revenue Maximization, Managers and the Principal-Agent Problem.

Imperfect Competition: (a)Monopoly:Barriers to Entry, Profit Maximization and Output Choice, Monopoly and Resource Allocation, Monopoly and Product Quality, Peak-load pricing; Two-part tariff; Price Discrimination, Regulation of Monopolies; (b)Monopolistic Competition: Model of Product Differentiation; (c)Oligopoly:Pricing under Homogeneous Oligopoly.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
General Equilibrium and Efficiency
 

General Equilibrium: General Equilibrium Models, Perfectly Competitive Price System, The Necessity of General Equilibrium; Efficiency: Pareto Efficiency, Efficiency in Production, Efficiency in Product Mix, Competitive Prices and Efficiency; Departures from the Competitive Assumptions, Market Adjustment and Information, Disequilibrium Pricing and Expectations. Externalities – Positive and Negative externalities, Externalities of imperfect competition.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Snyder, C. & Nicholson, W. (2011). Fundamentals of Microeconomics (11th ed.).New Delhi: Cengage Learning India.

Varian, H. R. (2014). Intermediate Microeconomics: a Modern Approach (9th ed.). New Delhi:  W.W. Norton and Company/Affiliated East-West Press India.

Bernheim, D & B. Michael, W. D. (2009). Microeconomics.  New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Henderson, J. M. &Quandt R. E. (2003). Microeconomic Theory: A Mathematical Approach, New Delhi: McGraw Hill.

Koutsoyiannis, A. (1979).  Modern Microeconomics. London:  Macmillan Press.

Kreps, David M., (1990). A Course in Microeconomic Theory. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Lipsey, R.G. & K.A. Chrystal. (1999). Principles of Economics. (9th ed.). Oxford. Oxford University Press.

Mas-Colell, A., Whinston, M. D., & Green, J. R. (1995). Microeconomic theory. (Vol. 1). New York: Oxford University Press.

Pindyck, R &Rubinfeld, D. (2013). Micro Economics. (8th ed.). New York: Pearson Education.

Samuelson, P. A., & Nordhaus, W. D. (2010). Economics, (19th ed.). New Delhi: McGraw-Hill

               Companies.

Sen, A. (2007). Microeconomics: Theory and Applications. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

EvaluationPattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA 3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

BSEH332N - INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims at systematically introducing the students to formal modeling of a macroeconomy and thereby introduces them to the dynamics that exists in the relationships of various important macroeconomic variables. The course begins with an in depth discussion of the IS-Lm framework which forms the fountain of the Keynesian approach. Then it proceeds to the derivation of aggregate demand and supply, discussions on unemployment and Inflation, exchange rate determination in an open economy and major macroeconomic policies for economic stabilisation. The course has also included in its discussion recent debates in the field of macroeconomics such as the critiques of IS-LM framework, Backward bending Phillips curve, Discretion versus Policy debate etc. It also introduces students to the latest development in the field of macroeconomic policy such as inflation targeting approach. 

Course Objectives:

  • To enhance the understanding of closed and open macro-economy modeling. 
  • To critically reflect on the dynamics of macroeconomic policies in the present economic conditions. 
  • To understand and critically evaluate the current developments in the field of macroeconomic policy.

Learning Outcome

CO1: It provides the student a strong foundation in applications of macroeconomic theory and to understand the dynamic relationship of macroeconomic variables.

CO2: It helps in understanding the current discussions in the field of macroeconomics and to critically evaluate their policy prescriptions.

CO3: It enables the student to evaluate the pros and cons of different macroeconomic policies in real situations.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
The Closed Economy in the Short Run
 

The goods market and derivation of IS curve; real influences and Shift in IS schedule; the money market and derivation of LM curve; monetary influences and the shift in LM curve; determination of equilibrium income and interest rates;; the relative efficacy of fiscal and monetary policy under IS-LM framework; Critiques of IS-LM

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
The Aggregate Demand and Supply
 

The derivation of aggregate demand and supply curves; The Keynesian aggregate demand with vertical aggregate supply curve; sources of wage rigidity and unemployment; the flexible price with fixed money wage model; labour supply and money wage; the shift in aggregate supply; Keynes vs. Classics.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Output, Inflation and Unemployment
 

Links between output and unemployment: Okun’s law; Estimates of potential GDP and their limitations; Natural rate of unemployment; Factors affecting natural rate of unemployment; Links between inflation and unemployment: Phillips curve; Friedman-Phelps expectations augmented Phillips curve; Output-inflation tradeoff: Keynesian vs. Monetarists view; Backward bending Phillips Curve and threshold inflation; Disinflation and sacrifice ratio.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Open Economy Models
 

The Mundell-Fleming model: Key Assumption; determining equilibrium output and exchange rate in a small open economy; the monetary and fiscal policy under floating and fixed exchange rates regimes; the Mundell-Fleming model with changing price level.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Macroeconomic Policy
 

Active or Passive Policy Debate; Fiscal Policy: Public-Choice and Partisan Theories, Automatic Fiscal Stabilisers, Pros and Cons of Balanced Budget Rules, Traditional and Ricardian View of Public debt, crowding in and crowding out effect, Ricardian equivalence; Monetary Policy: Goals of Monetary Policy and Intermediate Targets, Choosing Intermediate Targets in the case of Supply and Demand Shocks, Targeting Monetary Aggregates and its Implications, Targeting Interest Rates and its Implications; Recent International Experience: Discretion versus Policy Rules Debate, Taylor’s Rule and Monetary Policy – Inflation Targeting – Issues Relating to Inflation Targeting – Country Experiences with Inflation Targeting.

Text Books And Reference Books:

D‘Souza, E. (2012). Macroeconomics (2nd ed.). New Delhi: Pearson Education.

Dornbusch, R., Fischer, S., &Startz, R. (2015). Macroeconomics (11th ed.). New Delhi: Tata McGraw.

Froyen, R. (2014). Macroeconomics: Theories and Policies (10th ed.). New Delhi: Pearson Education.

Mankiw, N. G. (2015). Macroeconomics (9th ed.). London: Worth Publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Abel, A. B. & Bernanke, B. S. (2011). Macroeconomics (7th ed.) New Delhi: Pearson Education.

Blanchard, O. (2009). Macroeconomics (5th ed.). New Delhi: Pearson Education.

Krugman, P. R., Obstfeld, M. & Melitz, M. (2012). International Economics (9th ed.). New Delhi: Pearson Education.

Mishkin, F. S. (2016). Macroeconomics: Policy & Practice (2nd ed.). New Delhi: Pearson Education.

Moorthy, V. (2017). Applied Macroeconomics. New Delhi: I. K. International Publishing House.

Sheffrin, S. M. (1996). Rational Expectations (2nd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

EvaluationPattern     CIA1        MSE* (CIA2)        CIA3         ESE**     Attendance

Weightage                  20             25                20                30               05

* Mid Semester Exam ** End Semester Exam

BSEH333N - STATISTICS FOR ECONOMICS - II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This is a course on Statistical Methods for Economics II. It begins with some basic concepts of probability, followed by probability distributions of discrete and continuous random variables and joint distributions. A detailed focus is given for inferential statistics (testing of hypothesis), and the course ends with parametric and non-parametric test for better statistical inference.

Course Objectives

This course has been designed to help students;

  • To develop advance skills in applied statistics;
  • To enhance the understanding in the field of economic analysis and reasoning;
  • To develop skills in the presentation of data and to do empirical research in the field of interest.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To provide an understanding of the concepts and methods of Statistics, for application in data analysis

CO2: To get statistical skill required for the analysis of socio-economic data

CO3: To provide hands-on training in data analysis (along with computer applications)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Elementary Probability Theory and Distribution
 

Sample spaces and events; probability axioms and properties; counting techniques; conditional probability and Bayes’ rule; independence.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Random Variables and Probability Distributions
 

Defining random variables; Probability distributions; Expected values of random variables and functions of random variables; Properties of commonly used discrete and continuous distributions (Uniform, Binomial, Normal, Poisson and Exponential random variables).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Testing of Hypothesis: Basic Concepts
 

Meaning of hypothesis; Types and steps in testing of hypothesis; Flow diagram for hypothesis testing; Type I and Type II error; Two-tailed and One-tailed tests (basics); Importance of parametric and non-parametric tools.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Testing of Hypothesis: Parametric Tests
 

‘t’ Test: One sample ‘t’ test; Independent sample ‘t’ test; Paired sample ‘t’ test; Analysis of variance (ANOVA).

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Testing of Hypothesis: Non-Parametric Tests
 

Chi-square test; Phi co-efficient; Mann-Whitney test; Wilcoxon signed rank test; Kruskal- Wallis test; Friedman’s ANOVA.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Anderson, D. R., Sweeney, D. J., Williams, T. A., Camm, J. D., & Cochran, J. J. (2014). Essentials of Statistics for Business and Economics. Boston: Cengage Learning.

Douglas, A. L., Lind, W. G. M., & Samuel, A. W. (2006). Basic Statistics for Business and Economics. New York: McGraw-Hill Education

Kothari, C. R. (2004). Research Methodology: Methods and Techniques. New Delhi: New Age International.

Sharma, J. K. (2010). Fundamentals of Business Statistics. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Croxton, F. E. F. E., & Cowden, D. J. (1955). Applied General Statistics. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Inc.

Freund, J. E., & Perles, B. M. (2007). Modern Elementary Statistics. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Gupta, S. C., & Kapoor, V. K. (2007). Fundamentals of Applied Statistics. New Delhi: Sultan Chand & Sons.

Larsen, R. J., & Marx, M. L. (2012). An Introduction to Mathematical Statistics and its Applications. (5 th ed.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Evaluation Pattern

EvaluationPattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

 CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

5

* Mid Semester Exam ** End Semester Exam

BSEH341AN - ENTREPRENEURSHIP (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description                          

A common believe for entrepreneurs is that “Entrepreneurs are born and not made”. The course is devised in a way to equip individuals in a formally to generate employment, working on innovations, and developing the underprivileged areas.

 

Course Objectives

To familiarize the students with entrepreneurship development, process of establishing and enterprise and the type of support available from various government and non-government institutions.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand the need and importance of developing entrepreneurship and the role of government in promoting entrepreneurship.

CO2: Identify & develop key entrepreneurial competencies & skills to take up entrepreneurship

CO3: Examine the entrepreneurial opportunities and transform them in to business plans

CO4: Evaluate factors influencing the entrepreneurial activities in the context of the economic, socio-cultural, legal, technological and global environment

CO5: To adapt functional management knowledge in to new business ideas

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Foundation of Entrepreneurship
 

Concept and need of entrepreneurship, Characteristics and types of entrepreneurship, Charm of becoming an entrepreneur, Entrepreneurial decision process, Entrepreneurship as career, Entrepreneurship Vs management Vs intrapreneurship, Changing role of the entrepreneur, Entrepreneurship traits, Factors affecting entrepreneurship.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Theories of Entrepreneurship
 

Influences on entrepreneurship development, External influences on entrepreneurship development: Socio cultural, Political and economical, Personal entrepreneurship success and failure, Reasons and remedies, Women entrepreneurs, Challenges and achievement of women entrepreneurs.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Entrepreneurial Motivation and Competencies
 

Meaning of entrepreneurial motivation, Motivation cycle or process, Theories of entrepreneurial motivation, Entrepreneurial motivating factors, Changes in entrepreneurial motivation, Entrepreneurial motivation behavior, Meaning of entrepreneurial competencies, Major entrepreneurial competencies, Developing entrepreneurial competencies.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Opportunities Identification and Selection
 

Need for opportunities identification and selection, Environmental dynamics and changes, Business opportunities in various sectors, Identification of business opportunities, Opportunity selection.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Business Planning Process
 

The business plan as an entrepreneurial tool, Elements of business planning, Objectives, Market analysis, Development of product/idea, Marketing, Finance, Organization and management, Ownership, Critical risk contingencies of the proposal, SWOT Analysis, Strategy Formulation.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Entrepreneurship Development and Government
 

Role of central and state government in promoting entrepreneurship and challenges, Government initiatives and inclusive entrepreneurial growth. MSME- definitions, Profile of activities. Role of MSMEs in Indian economy (national and state-level).

Text Books And Reference Books:

Desai, V.; Dynamics of Entrepreneurship: New Venture Creation; Pearson Education.

Dollinger, M. J.; Entrepreneurship: New Venture Creation; Pearson Education.

Kuraktko, F.D., Richard, M.H.; Entrepreneurship Theory, Process Practices; Thomson Learning.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Zimmerer, W.T. and Norman, M.S.; Essentials of Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management; Pearson Education.

Hisrich, R. D., Peters, M. P. and Shepherd, D. A.; Entrepreneurship, McGraw Hill.

Holt, H. D.; Entrepreneurship: New Venture Creation; Pearson Education.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA 2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

BSEH421N - ACCOUNTING FOR DECISION MAKING - II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This subject will enable students to understand the importance of analysis and interpretation of financial statements, calculation of ratios and their analysis.  Preparation of funds flow and cash flow statement to know the changes in financial position, Also preparation of marginal cost sheet with a view to prepare management reports for decision making. As a prerequisite, students should have basic knowledge about the concepts relating to accounts, and managing business.

 

Course Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the tools and techniques used in management accounting.
  2. Evaluate the financial performance of an organization using Ratio analysis.
  3. Make use of cost, volume and profit analyses to take managerial decisions.
  4. Assess the change in and movement of funds and cash in business through preparation of fund flow and cash flow statements.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand the tools and techniques used in management accounting.

CO2: Analyze and interpret the performance of the firm through preparation of comparative and common size statements and trend analyses.

CO3: Evaluate the financial performance of an organization using Ratio analysis.

CO4: Assess the change in and movement of funds and cash in business through preparation of fund flow and cash flow statements.

CO5: Make use of cost, volume and profit analyses to take managerial decision

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Cost and Management Accounting
 

Basics of cost and management accounting. Elements of cost and cost determination. Cost Classification by Business Function. Cost Classification for Planning, Control and Decision Making. Cost Control. Cost Reduction. Cost Management. Cost Sheet. Cost Behaviour-- Variable cost, Fixed cost and Mixed cost Behaviour. Importance of analyzing Cost Behaviour and Cost Segregation. Cost Behavior and Income Determination. Absorption Costing. Variable Costing. Comparison of Absorption Costing and Variable Costing. Reconciling Absorption Costing Profit and Variable Costing Profit. Benefits and Shortcomings of Variable Costing.    

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Financial Analysis
 

Concept and types of Financial Statements, significance and importance of Financial Statements, methods of analysis of financial statements, techniques of analysis and interpretation – Comparative Income Statements, Comparative Balance Sheets, Common Size Income Statements, Common Size Balance Sheets, Trend Analysis (problems on the above topics).

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Ratio Analysis
 

Meaning of Ratio, objectives of Ratio Analysis, Significance of Ratio Analysis, Limitations of Ratio Analysis, Classification of Ratios, calculation and interpretation of profitability ratios, liquidity ratios, solvency ratios, advanced problems on the above (including preparation of Income statement and Balance sheet).

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Funds Flow Statement and Cash Flow Statement
 

Introduction & Meaning of Funds Flow Statement, Concept of Fund, Concept of Flow of Fund, Uses and Limitations of Funds Flow Statement, Schedule of Changes in Working Capital, Calculation of Funds From Operations, Statement of Sources and Application of Funds – basic problems on the above. Introduction & meaning of CFS, differences between FFS and CFS, utility and limitations of CFS, Preparation of CFS – advanced problems (only indirect method) according to accounting standard 3.

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Planning and Control
 

Budget and Budgetary control — basic concepts. Classification of Budgets. Master budget.  Fixed and Flexible Budgeting. Revision of Budgets. Zero Base Budgeting. Performance Report.  (Problems on Flexible Budget only)    

Cost Volume Profit Analysis-- Concepts and Techniques. Contribution Margin Analysis. Break even Analysis. Margin of safety. Angle of incidence. Applications of CVP Analysis. Limitations of CVP Analysis. 

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Marginal Costing and Decision making
 

Introduction, meaning of marginal cost and marginal costing, distinction between Absorption costing and Marginal costing, Contribution, Profit Volume Ratio, break Even Point, Margin of Safety, and Sales to earn a desired profit. Application of Marginal costing in pricing, accepting special order or Foreign Market Order, Profit Planning, Decision to Make or Buy, Problem of Limiting or Key factor and Choice of Profitable Mix.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Anil Kumar, Rajesh Kumar (2017).Corporate Accounting. Mumbai: Himalayan Publishing House /Student Edition, 

M.C. Shukla, T.S. Grewal & S.C. Gupta (2017).Advanced Accountancy. New Delhi:S. Chand & Company Ltd.

R.L. Gupta & M. Radhaswamy(2017). Advanced Accountancy. New Delhi:Sultan Chand & Sons.

Dr. Maheshwari S.N & Dr. Maheshwari S.K (2017). Advanced Accountancy Vol.1, Vol.-2. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd

Mukerjee&Hanif, Modern Accountancy (2017).New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill.

S.K. Paul, Accountancy, (2017). New Delhi: New Central Book Agency (P) Ltd.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

S.N Maheshwari, "Accounting for Management", Vikas Publishing House

I.M.Pandey, "Management Accounting", VikasPublishing House 

R.S.N.Pillai and Bagavathi, "Management Accounting", S.Chand Publishing 

Jain, S.P. and K.L. Narang. Corporate Accounting(2017). New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

EvaluationPattern

CIA1

MSE*(CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

BSEH422N - COMPUTER APPLICATIONS FOR ECONOMIC ANALYSIS - II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course is an introduction to the various three important software highly used in economic analysis especially quantitative data analysis. The course begins with an introduction to MS Excel, managing data in MS Excel and doing basic statistical analysis using MS Excel. Then the course will introduce students to popular econometric software Eviews and provide hands on training on econometric analysis and forecasting of time series data using Eviews. The course also has dedicated sessions to provide hands on training to students on cross-sectional and panel data analysis using popular econometric analysis software STATA.

Course Objectives

The major objectives of this course are

 

  • To provide hands on training to students on quantitative data analysis;

  • To enhance the technological skills of the students by introducing them to popular data analysis softwares such as Eviews and STATA; and

  • To ensure that students have sufficient skills to carry out independent data analysis.

Learning Outcome

CO1: get hands-on experience in quantitative data analysis.

CO2: carry out independent research using quantitative data.

CO3: get opportunities to practice the theories learnt in Statistics and Econometrics, there by enhance and concrete their understanding of the subject.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Basics of Excel
 

Introduction to MS Excel: Excel worksheet, the ribbon, tool bar, creating file, formatting cells, basic maths; Introduction to formula: formula anatomy, math functions, basic statistics, logical functions; Data tabulation: Sorting, filtering; Graphical representation of data: Column, bar, pie, line, area charts.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Statistical Analysis Using Excel
 

Pivot tables; Descriptive statistics; Histogram; Data analysis: ANOVA: F-test; t-test; z-test; Correlation; Covariance and regression.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to Time Series Analysis Using Eviews
 

 

Introduction to time series data: RBI, CSO, OECD, World bank, BSE databases; Introduction to Eviews: Creating workfile, Importing data, Editing data, Saving workfile; Time series analysis: Graphical plot, seasonal adjustment, trend filtering, unit root tests, least square regression; testing for heteroscedasticity, autocorrelation, multicollinearity; causality test; testing for cointegration.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Economic Forecasting Techniques Using Eviews
 

Estimating ARMA model: Specification, Selection of Best Model, Forecasting; Estimating a VAR system: Specification, Selection of Lag Length, VAR stability check, graphing Impulse Response Functions, Variance Decomposition, and Vector Error Correction Mechanism.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Cross-sectional Data Analysis using STATA
 

Introduction to Cross section data: NSS, NFHS, IHSN, IHDS; Introduction to Stata: the variable view, command view, review and data edit, do file creation, log file creation, importing and exporting data, generating variable, combing data files, modifying data and rename, replace, labeling, recode, user written files, describe, summerise, tabulate, and bysort; Use of Dummy variables in Stata; Linear Probability Model, Logit Model and Probit Model; Hypothesis and specification test.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Panel Data Analysis using STATA
 

Introduction to panel data; Panel data organisation, description, within and between variation, time series plot, scatter plot, Fixed effect,  Random effects and pooled OLS model.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential Readings

Agung, I. G. N. (2011). Time Series Data Analysis Using Eviews. New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Baum, C. F. (2006). An Introduction to Modern Econometrics Using STATA. Texas: Stata Press Publication.

Cameron, C. A. & Trivedi, P. K. (2009). Microeconometrics Using STATA. Texas: Stata Press Publication.

Gujarati, D. N. (2016). Econometrics by Example (2nd ed.). New Delhi: Palgrave.

Levine, D. M. (2005). Statistics for Managers Using Microsoft Excel (5th ed.). New York: Prentice Hall.

Long, J. S. & Freese, J. (2001). Regression Models for Categorical Dependent Variables using STATA. Texas: Stata Press Publication.

Longest, K. C. (2014). Using STATA for Qualitative Analysis (2nd ed.). London: Sage Publications.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Readings

Dougherty, C. (2016). Introduction to Econometrics (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.

Gujarati, D. N., Porter, D.C., &Gunasekar, S. (2017). Basic Econometrics (5th ed.). New Delhi: McGraw-Hill.

Koutsoyiannis, A. (1973). Theory of Econometrics. New York: Harper & Row.

Long, J. S. (1997). Regression Models for Categorical and Limited Dependent Variables. London: Sage Publications.

Patterson, K. (2000). An Introduction to Applied Econometrics: A Time Series Approach. London: Palgrave.

Pindyck, R. S., &Rubinfeld, D. L. (1990). Econometric Models and Econometric Forecasts (4th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

Wooldridge, J. M. (2002). Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data. Massachusetts: MIT Press.

 

Wooldridge, J. M. (2014). Introductory Econometrics: A Modern Approach (4th ed.). New Delhi: Cengage Learning.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation

Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage 

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

 

Examination

Method of assessment

CIA 1, MSE and CIA3

Practical exam

ESE

Submission paper

Note: An analytical research article is expected from students using the computer applications taught in the class.

 

BSEH431N - FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

The course introduces the fundamental concepts, approaches and theories in development economics to provide a solid foundation to explore the diverse patterns in the path of achieving economic development as well as varied levels of economic development across nations.
In addition the course throws light on the contemporary issues and hindrances to economic development.

 

Course Objectives

The course is intended:

  • To give an understanding of the theoretical perceptions of economic growth and development together with the forces bringing about them.
  • To broaden the awareness of the challenges in the developmental process and thus motivate the students towards the thinking of alternative solutions.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Recognize and examine role of theories of economics of development in number of existing development issues.

CO2: Reflect on the inter links between various development economic theories and approaches.

CO3: Explore the prospects of the course to improve the quality of life in developing countries.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction and Relevant Concepts
 

Concept of Economic growth and development; Measurement: Traditional Measures, the new economic view of development, Sen’s Capabilities Approach; Development and Happiness and other recent measures; Core values and objectives of development; the central role of women; Environmental sustainability and sustainable development: Concept and recent strategies; Common characteristics of developing nations and difference between low income countries today and developed countries in earlier stages.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Four Classic Approaches to Growth and Development
 

Development as growth and linear stage theories: Rostow’s stages theory, Harrod-Domar Model and Romer’s model; Structural change models: Lewis model and Chenery’s patterns of growth; International dependence revolution: False-paradigm model; Neo-classical growth model: Solow’s growth model; Neo-classical counter revolution: market fundamentalism; classic theories of development: reconciling the differences.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Contemporary Models of Development and Underdevelopment
 

Underdevelopment as Coordination failure; Multiple Equilibria: A Diagrammatic Approach; the Big Push theory; Problems in multiple equilibria.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Poverty, Inequality and Development
 

Concept of Poverty- absolute, relative and Poverty Line; Absolute poverty: Measurement, popular and recent measures, extent and magnitude; Concept of inequality and measurement, size distributions, Lorenz curves, Gini co-efficient and recent measures; Poverty inequality and social welfare: Economic growth and income inequality; Kuznets’ inverted Hypothesis; Impact of inequality on development.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Urbanization and Informal Sector
 

Causes and effects of urbanization; Migration and development: Harris-Todaro model of rural-urban migration; Policies for the urban informal sector; Women in the informal sector: the Microfinance revolution.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Planning for Development
 

Development planning: concepts and rationale; basics of development planning process; role of State versus market in planning for development; development roles of NGOs.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Todaro, M. P., & Smith, S. C. (2012). Economic Development (11th ed.). Washington, DC: George Washington University.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Acemoglu, D. & Robinson, J. (2006). Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Basu, K. (1997). Analytical Development Economics: The Less Developed Economy Revisited. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Dasgupta, P. (2007). Economics: A Very Short Introduction. New York: Oxford University Press.

Putnam, R. (1994). Making Democracy Work: Civic Traditions in Modern Italy. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Ray, D. (2011). Development Economics. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Schultz, T. P., & Strauss, J. (2008). Handbook of Development Economics (eds.). (Vol. 4). Oxford: Elsevier.

Sen, A. (2000). Development as Freedom. New York: Oxford University Press.

Thirlwall, A. (2006). Growth & Development. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Evaluation Pattern

EvaluationPattern

CIA1

MSE*(CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

BSEH432N - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course is intended to enable students to develop/refresh their skills in conducting research that is rigorous and ethical. A thorough understanding of the principles, theory and methods of research will guide them to design and conduct a small-scale research project. The section on data analysis methods will help them arrive at sound inferences and analytical conclusions.

 

Course Objectives

To train students:

  • To understand the importance of research in creating and extending the knowledge base in their area of research interest;
  • To develop their ability to distinguish between the strengths and limitations of different research approaches in general and in their research area specifically;
  • To gain skills required to work independently, so that they can plan and carry out a small-scale research project.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To analyse and evaluate the concepts critically underpinning different research methodologies suitable for use within the economics and social sciences.

CO2: To demonstrate in-depth knowledge of a range of research methods applicable to economics discipline and decide how to choose a method guided by their research question.

CO3: To gain a clear understanding of the ethical considerations and the need for rigour in conducting research in social sciences.

CO4: To propose, justify and undertake a small-scale research project.

CO5: To read, analyse critically, compare and evaluate peer-reviewed journal articles from social science discipline in their area of interest.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Meaning and Definition of Research
 

Meaning and definition of research; criteria for good research; objectives of research; difficulties in social research; utility of research.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Philosophy and Methods of Social Research
 

Research Philosophy: Positivism, Interpretivism and Realism; Deductive and inductive methods; classification of research.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Selection of Research Problem
 

Steps involved in selection of research problem; evaluation of the problem; literature review, sources of literatures.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Research Design and Ethics
 

Research design: Meaning, types and evaluation of research design; Research Ethics in designing, data collection and analysis.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Sampling and Sample Design
 

Meaning of sampling; Sampling process; Methods of sampling; Sampling errors; Calculating sample size.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:15
Methods of Data Collection
 

Types of data: Primary and secondary data; Methods for primary data collection: observation; interview; questionnaire; schedule; Sources of secondary data; Case study; Survey methods.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:9
Data Processing, Analysis and Interpretation
 

Steps in data processing: Editing; Coding; Classification; Transcription; Analysis of data and interpretation.

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:8
Report Writing
 

Types of report; Planning of report writing; Format of research report; Reference styles.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Cargan, L. (2007). Doing Social Research. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Kothari, C. R. (2014). Research Methodology: Methods and Techniques (2nd ed.). New Delhi: New Age International Publishers.

Walliman, N. (2016). Social Research Method: The Essentials. London: SAGE Publications.

Wellington, J. &Szczerbiński, M. (2007). Research Methods for the Social Sciences. New York: Continuum International Publishing Group.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Andres, L. (2012). Designing & Doing Survey Research. London: SAGE Publications.

Buchanan, D. A., & Bryman, A. (2009). The SAGE Handbook of Organizational Research Methods. London: SAGE Publications.

Gillham, B. (2000). Case Study Research Methods. London: Continuum International Pub. Group.

Gillham, B. (2008). Small-scale Social Survey Methods: Real World Research. London: Continuum International Publishing Group.

Hammersley, M., &Traianou, A. (2012). Ethics in Qualitative Research: Controversies and Contexts. London: SAGE Publications.

Mustafa, A. (2008). Case Study Method: Theory and Practice: Research and Management Approaches. New Delhi: Atlantic Publishers & Distributors.

Ornstein, M. D. (2013). A Companion to Survey Research. London: SAGE Publications.

Saldaña, J. (2012). The Coding Manual for Qualitative Researchers. London: SAGE Publications.

Saunders, M., Lewis, P., & Thornhill, A. (2011). Research Methods for Business Students (5th ed.). New Delhi: Pearson Education Ltd.

Yang, K. (2010). Making Sense of Statistical Methods in Social Research. London:  SAGE Publications.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE*(CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

*Mid Semester Exam      **End Semester Exam

BSEH433N - INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMETRICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to basic econometric concepts and techniques. The course adopts a step-by-step approach of introducing students to the concepts and techniques of econometric analysis. The course begins with an introduction to the definitions and scope of econometrics. Then students will be introduced to simple and multiple regression models and the issues involved in Classical Linear Regression Modelling. There is a separate unit to discuss the use of dummy variables in econometric analysis. The course also covers the consequences of and tests for misspecification of regression models. 

 

 

Course Objectives

The course aims at providing students with:

  • A comprehensive introduction to basic econometric concepts and techniques.
  • The ability to apply econometric techniques in the investigation of economic relationships and processes.
  • An introduction to data analysis and to the specific econometric problems associated with economic statistics.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: For the construction and estimation of simple and multiple regression models.

CO2: To perform econometric analysis and estimation, by understanding their application in economics.

CO3: To analyse each economic problem in depth.

CO4: To do not only the estimation of the model and testing of the hypotheses, but also perform post-estimation diagnostics and see how well the model performs.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction
 

Definition and scope of econometrics; Methodology of econometric research; Historical origin of the term regression and its modern interpretation; Statistical vs. deterministic relationship; regression vs. causation, regression vs. correlation; Terminology and notation; The nature and sources of data for econometric analysis.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Simple Linear Regression Model
 

Two Variable Case Estimation of model by OLS method: Assumptions; Properties of Least Square Estimators: Gauss-Markov Theorem; Testing of regression coefficient; Test for regression as a whole: Coefficient of determination.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Multiple Linear Regression Model
 

Multiple Regression Analysis: The problem of estimation, notation and assumptions; meaning of partial regression coefficients; the multiple coefficient of determination: R2 and the multiple coefficient of correlation; R2 and adjusted R2; partial correlation coefficients; interpretation of multiple regression equation.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Relaxing the Assumptions of CLRM
 

Introduction to Multicollinearity, Heteroscedasticity & Autocorrelation: the nature of the problem; its detection and corrective measures.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Model Specification Errors
 

Omitted Variables and test; Irrelevant Variables; Misspecification of the functional form; Alternative functional forms; Errors of Measurement: Outliers; Leverage and Influence data.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:15
Dummy Variable Regression Models
 

Dummy Variable technique: The Nature of Dummy Variables; Dummy Variable Trap; ANOVA; Use of Dummy variables:  Structural Break; Seasonal Adjustment; and Interaction effects; Nature of Qualitative response models: Linear Probability Model; Logit Model; Probit Model.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Gujarati, D. N. (2016). Econometrics by Example (2nd ed.). New Delhi: Palgrave.

Gujarati, D. N., Porter, D.C., &Gunasekar, S. (2017). Basic Econometrics. (5th ed.). New Delhi: McGrawHill.

Studenmund, A. H. (2016). Using Econometrics: A Practical Guide. (7th ed.). New Delhi:  Pearson.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Dougherty, C. (2016). Introduction to Econometrics (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.

Koutsoyiannis, A. (1973). Theory of Econometrics. New York: Harper & Row.

Wooldridge, J. M. (2014). Introductory Econometrics: A Modern Approach (4th ed.). New Delhi: Cengage Learning.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE*(CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

BSEH441AN - MONEY AND BANKING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course exposes students to the economy's theory and functioning of the monetary and financial sectors. It also discusses interest rates and monetary management. An introduction to international financial institutions are also covered.

 

Course Objectives

 

  • To introduce theoretical concepts related to money and banking.   

  • To introduces the board structure and functioning of banking and financial institutions.

  • To introduce the concept of interest rate and its various theories.

  • To expose to various important international financial institutions.

Learning Outcome

CO1: The students will have better understanding of banking structure and functions after completing this course.

CO2: They will have better understanding of role and working of International financial institutions.

CO3: They will be able to think like economists.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Exploring the concept of money
 

Money: Introduction, definitions, types, nature and functions; money and near money. Demand for money:  Fisher, Cambridge, Keynesian and Friedman theories. Supply of money:  mechanics of money supply creation; measures of money supply in India.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Rate of Interest
 

Rate of Interest:  Meaning and Classification of Interest, Determination; Factors affecting the level  and structure of interest rates. Theories of interest: Classical theory of interest, Neo classical theory of interest and Keynesian theory of interest. Interest rates in India.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Commercial and Central Banking System
 

Commercial Banks: Meaning, types, functions and credit creations; Commercial banks in India: Structure, growth and Nationalization-objective and performance; Regional Rural Banks and Co-operative Banks: Evolution, structure, features and growth.  

 

Central Banking: Meaning and functions, techniques of credit control with special reference to India, credit policy in India.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
International Banking Institutions
 

International Monetary System: Problem of International liquidity. IMF: Its working and role in international financial system. World bank: Evolution, structure, functions and role. Asian Development Banks: Structure, role and functions.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential Readings

L. M. Bhole and J. Mahukud. Financial Institutions and Markets. Tata McGraw Hill. 2011. 

Misra, S. Puri. Indian Economy. Himalaya Publishing House. 2015.

 

Paul, R.R. Monetary Economics. Kalyani Publishers. 2005.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Readings

L. M. Bhole and J. Mahukud. Financial Institutions and Markets. Tata McGraw Hill. 2011. 

Misra, S. Puri. Indian Economy. Himalaya Publishing House. 2015.

Pathak, Bharati V. The Indian Financial System, Market, Institutions & Services. Pearson. 2008. 

4.   

Sundram, K.P.M. Money, Banking, Trade and Finance. Sultan Chand & Sons. New Delhi. 2014.

F. S. Mishkin and S. G. Eakins, Financial Markets and Institutions, Pearson Education, 6th edition, 2009.

F. J. Fabozzi, F. Modigliani, F. J. Jones, M. G. Ferri, Foundations of Financial Markets and Institutions, Pearson Education, 3rd edition, 2009. 

 

M. Y. Khan, Indian Financial System, Tata McGraw Hill, 7th edition, 2011.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage 

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

 

Question Paper Pattern: MSE and ESE (Max. Marks = 50)

 

Section A

Section B

Section C

5 x 2 = 10 Marks

6 x 5 = 30 Marks

1 x 10 = 10 Marks

BSEH441BN - ECONOMICS OF EDUCATION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

 

Economics of education is one of the branches of economics, though, it is the study of how educational managers make official or approved choices from scarce available resources which is meant for the realization of the best possible educational outcomes. It deals with the economic issues relating to education, including the demand for education, the financing and provision of education, and the comparative efficiency of various educational programs and policies. This course is designed for the undergraduate students to have a basic concept and relevance of the subject so as they would learn to appreciate the significance and value of education in the process of the Economic growth and development of the country. 

 

Course Objectives

To enable the students to:

 

  • Develop an understanding of benefits, costs and financing of education.

  • Develop and understanding of the link between the educational system and economic development.

  • Develop an understanding of educational problems in the context of economic concepts. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: appreciate the significance and value of education in economic growth

CO2: develop an appreciation of the capital value of education and the limitations of treating education as a form of capital

CO3: identify the factors that are involved in studying demand/supply aspects of education

CO4: distinguish between the cost and benefit aspects of education

CO5: explain the underlying considerations of Educational Finance (EF) relating to resource mobilization, allocation and its efficient usage

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Conceptual Issues in economics of Education
 

a. Meaning, definition, scope and importance of Economics of Education. b. The relationship between education and the economic system. The role of the economic system in (i) financing of education, and (ii) absorbing the educated manpower. c. Education as an industry d. Education as consumption and Education as individual, social and national investment. e. Spill-over and inter-generational effects of education.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Demand and Supply of Education
 

Demand and Supply of Education. Determinants of Demand for Education. Cost of Education: Concept of Cost of Education; Types of Educational costs- Direct cost, Indirect cost, Private cost, Social cost and Opportunity cost. Benefits of Education: Direct and Indirect Benefits, Private and Social Benefits, Returns from Education, Private Returns Vs Social Returns. Meaning of cost-benefit analysis. Its purpose and problems.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Education and Economic Development
 

Key concepts: Economic growth, Development, Education. Significance of Education to Economic Development: The interrelationship between education and economic development. Education as a prerequisite as an accelerator and a major determinant of economic development. 

 

Measuring the Economic Value of Education: Alternative Approaches. Distinction Between Human Capital, Manpower and Human Resources. Education and economic development in urban and rural areas.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Educational Financing
 

Linkage of Education with Poverty and Income Distribution; Sources of Educational Finance; Expenditure on Education; Policy Orientation for Private Sector Investment; Cost Sharing in Higher Education; Policies of Educational Financing in Other Countries.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential Readings

 

Babalola, J.B. (2003). “Fundamentals of Economics of Education”, in J.B. Babalola (Ed). Basic Text in Educational Planning, EPPU. Ibadan: Deparment of Educational Management, University of Ibadan.

Natarajan S. (1990) Introduction to Economics of Education New Delhi. Sterling  

Goel S. C. (1975) Education and Economics Growth in India Delhi. Macmillan 

Vaisey, J. (1958) The Costs of Education London: George and Allen & Unwin Ltd. 

Vaisey, J. (1972) Economics of Education London: G Duck Worth and Co. 

Heggade, O. D. (1992) Economics of Education. Bombay: Himalaya Publishing House 

Balsara, M. (1996) New Education policy and Development Challenge, New Delhi. Kanishka Publishers.

Enaohwo J. O (1990) Economics of Education and the planning Challenge. New Delhi. Anmol Publications.

Muzammil, M. (1989) Financing of Education. New Delhi House. 

Shriprakash, Cost of Education (1996) New Delhi: Anamika Publishers and distributors.

 

Shriprakash and Chowdhurty S. Expenditure on Education, Theory, Models and Growth, New Delhi: NIEPA 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Readings

Garg V. P. (1985) The Cost Analysis in higher Education New Delhi, Metropolitan Book Co. Pvt Ltd. 

Hallak J. (1990) Investing in the Future UNESCO: Pergamon press 

Tilak J. B. G. (1994) Education for Development in Asia New Delhi Sage publications. 

Veena, D. R. (1987) Education of Economic Growth New Delhi: Ashish publishing House. 

Wykstra R. A. (ed) (1971) Education and the Economics of Human Capital New York: The Free press.

Psacheropoulos and Hinchcliff (1985), Returns to Education , Elsevier Publications,
New York.

Schultz, T.W. (1961), “Investment in Human Capital”, American Economic Review,
Vol. 60, 1961.

Seetharamu, A. S. (1985), Rural In-Migrants in Higher Education, CISRS, Madras.

Varghese, N. V., (2006), “Reforming Education Financing”, Seminar, http://
www.india-seminar.com/2000/494.

Tilak Jandhyala B G, (2006), “On Allocating 6 per cent of GDP to Education”,
Economic and Political Weekly, February 18.

…………..(2005), “Higher Education in ‘Trishanku’: Hanging Between State and
Market”, Economic and Political Weekly, September 10, 2005.

………….(2004), “Public Subsidies in Education in India”, Economic and Political
Weekly, January 24.

Mehrotra Santosh (2004), “Reforming Public Spending on Education and Mobilising
Resources: Lessons from International Experience”, Economic and Political Weekly,
February 28.

Chakrabarti, A and Joglekar R (2006), “Determinants of Expenditure on Education:
An Empirical Analysis Using State Level Data”, Economic and Political Weekly,
April 15.

 

Johnstone, D. B. (2003), “Cost Sharing in Higher Education: Tuition, Financial
Assistance, and Accessibility in a Comparative Perspective”, Institute of Sociology,
Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague.
Manpower Profile India Yearbook 2004, Institute of Applied Manpower Research,
New Delhi

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

 

EvaluationPattern

CIA1

MSE*(CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

Question Paper Pattern: MSE and ESE (Max. Marks = 50)

 

Section A

Section B

6 x 5 = 30 Marks

2 x 10 = 20 Marks

BSEH521N - HEALTH ECONOMICS: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Health economics is at interface of economics and health science. Economic theory is applied for decision making in the health sector. The course aims at providing the students with the basic knowledge on the definition and scope of health and measuring the quality of health using appropriate methods and to relate the supply and demand concept with respect to health, understanding different health costs concepts and functioning of economics of health insurance. The course also aims to introduce economic evaluation techniques to measure the health outcomes and its implication which will enable the students to practically use the evaluation technique for predicting outcomes.

 

Course Objectives

  • To provide students an introduction to the various concepts regarding health care, cost , insurance and health care management
  • To enable students to apply Cost Benefit analysis, Cost Effectiveness analysis and Cost Utility analysis on the various issues concerning health in India

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: The students will gain knowledge about the basics of health economics, distinguish between the demand for and supply of health and will be able to measure the quality of health.

CO2: Also, the students will be able to apply the cost-benefit/cost-effective/cost-utility methods to measure health outcomes.

CO3: Students will be able to compare different cost concepts and interpret the functioning of economics of health insurance. Students will be able to interpret the manpower planning.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction
 

What is Health Economics?; the four basic questions: Production and Allocative efficiency and the production possibility curve, the distribution question, implications of the four basic questions; Concept of Health; Health as a good and utility analysis; Concept of medical care; Production of good health, Determinants of good health; Measurement of health status and quality of life: Mortality, morbidity and HALY, QALY family of summary measures.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Demand for Medical Care
 

Demand for medical care and law of demand: Utility maximizing rule, the law of demand, other economic demand-side factors, supplier induced demand hypothesis; Non-economic determinants of demand for medical care, market demand for medical care, fuzzy demand curves and elasticities.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Health Cost Concepts and Economic Evaluation
 

Opportunity cost; fixed and variable costs; incremental and marginal cost; direct and indirect medical costs time costs and travel cost; cost benefit analysis; cost effectiveness analysis; cost utility analysis: methodologies and issues.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Economics of Health Insurance
 

The relationship between health insurance and demand for medical care; Information asymmetry, adverse selection; Risk aversion; Moral hazard; Health insurance-challenges; Insurance concepts; Co-payments; Co-insurance rates, deductibles, group insurance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Manpower Planning in Health Sector
 

Concept of manpower planning in health; Steps in Manpower planning - models; the health workforce; medical education; physician supply, physician incentives; Indian Medicine; the pharmaceutical industry. Indian health system delivery and policy: issues and way forward.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Essential Readings

1.Phelps, C. E. (2012). Health Economics. (6th ed.). London: Routledge.

 

2.Saterre, R. E, &Neun S P. (2007). Health Economics: Theories, Insights and Industry Studies. (5th ed.). New Delhi: Cengage Learning India Private Limited.

 

3.Kernick, D. (Ed.). (2002). Getting health economics into practice. Oxford: Radcliffe Medical Press.

4. Torka, S. (2010). Peter Zweifel, Friedrich Breyer, Mathias Kifmann: Health Economics.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Recommended Readings

 

  • Jones, A. M., Rice, N., d'Uva, T. B., & Balia, S. (2013). Applied health economics. Routledge.
  • Monheit, A., & Cantor, J. (2004). State health insurance market reform. Routledge International Studies in Health Economics.
  • Clewer, A. &Perkins, D. (1998). Economics for Healthcare Management. (1st ed.). United States: Prentice Hall.
  • Olsen, J A. (2009). Principles in Health Economics and Policy. (1st ed.). New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

 

Evaluation Pattern

EvaluationPattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

BSEH531N - INDIAN ECONOMY (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This paper aims at initiating among the students discussion on some of the key issues of Indian economy. It also aims at making the students understand the macroeconomic challenges and policy management in India with special reference to Karnataka. This paper exposes the students to the quantitative data on various economic aspects and policies in India and Karnataka as well.

 

Course Objectives

  • To give an overall understanding of major challenges faced by Indian economy.
  • To facilitate students to understand state wise key economic issues related with economic growth and development.

 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: The student is able to understand the features and structural changes of Indian economy and compare with the growth pattern and challenges of other economies.

CO2: The course enables the student to apply the theoretical knowledge in the actual working of Indian economy.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Economic Development since Independence
 

Major features of the economy at independence; Growth and development under different policy regimes, goals, constraints, institutions and policy framework; an assessment of performance, sustainability and regional contrasts; structural change, savings and investments

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Population and Human Development
 

Demographic trends: Population growth and size of population, aspects related to birth rate and death rate, composition and density of population,  demographic transition  and issues; Education: Literacy rates, enrollment rates; Primary, secondary and higher education; Technical education and skill gaps; Health and malnutrition: Trends, issues and programs.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Growth and Distribution
 

Trends and policies in poverty: Debate on poverty line; Inequality and unemployment trends; Employment generation programs and issues.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
International Comparisons
 

GDP; Unemployment; Poverty and Human Development Index (HDI): India’s position in International level; India and global economy.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Balanced Regional Development
 

Indicators of Regional Imbalances; Causes of Economic Backwardness and Regional Imbalances, changing scenarios in backward states since Economic reforms; Policy Measures to remove Regional Disparities; State Human Development Reports; End of the five-year plan, Three Year Action Agenda and Regional development. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Datt, G., & Mahajan, A. (2016). Indian economy. (72nd ed.). New Delhi:S.Chand& Company  Pvt. Ltd.

Kapila, U. (2016). Indian Economy – Performance and Policies (17th ed.). New Delhi: Academic Foundation.

 

Misra, S. K., &Puri, V. K. (2011). Indian economy (34th ed.). Delhi: Himalaya Publishing House.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Aiyar, S. S., &Mody, A. (2011). The demographic dividend: Evidence from the Indian states. IMF Working Paper WP/11/38, International Monetary Fund.

Balakrishnan, P. (2007). The recovery of India: Economic growth in the Nehru Era. Economic and Political Weekly, 42 (45-46), 52-66.

Baru, R., Acharya, A., Acharya, S., Kumar, A. S., & Nagaraj, K. (2010). Inequities in access to health services in India: caste, class and region. Economic and Political Weekly, 45 (38), 49-58.

Basu, K. (2009). China and India: idiosyncratic paths to high growth. Economic and Political Weekly, 44 (38), 43-56.

Deaton, A., &Drèze, J. (2009). Food and Nutrition in India: Facts and Interpretations. Economic and political weekly, 44 (07), 42-65.

Drèze, J., & Sen, A. (2013). An Uncertain Glory: India and its Contradictions. NJ: Princeton University Press.

Dyson, T. (2013). Population and Development: The Demographic Transition. New York: Zed Books Ltd.

Himanshu, R., & Sen, A. (2010). Towards New Poverty Lines for India. Economic & Political Weekly45 (1), 2-8.

Himanshu. (2011). Employment Trends in India: A Re-examination. Economic and Political Weekly, 46 (37), 43-59.

James, K. S. (2008). Glorifying Malthus: Current debate on demographic dividend in India. Economic and Political Weekly, 43 (25), 63-69.

Kapila, U. (Ed.). (2009). Indian Economy since Independence.  New Delhi: Academic Foundation.

Mohan, R. (2008). Growth record of the Indian economy, 1950-2008: A story of sustained savings and investment. Economic and Political Weekly, 43 (19), 61-71.

Shetty, S. L. (2007). India’s Savings Performance since the Advent of Planning. Institutions and Markets in India’s Development: Essays for K. N Raj, New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

 

Vaidyanathan, A., & Krishna, K. L. (Eds.). (2007). Institutions and Markets in India's Development: Essays for KN Raj. Oxford. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

EvaluationPattern

CIA1

MSE*(CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

BSEH532N - INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The aim of this paper is to provide students with a strong foundation in the principles of international economics which will help them to understand the trade theories and associated policies adopted in various countries. The paper will enable students to understand the impact of globalization on income, employment and social standards in the current international scenario. The paper covers the pure theory of trade and extensions thereof, commercial policy, economic integration, balance of payments, foreign exchange rate determination, international monetary system and economic crises in recent times.

Course Objectives

  • To introduce the basic principles and theories pertaining to international trade.
  • To enhance the understanding of trade policies and practices as well as their inter-linkages globally.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Gain a strong foundation in the principles of international economics

CO2: Be able to comprehend the trade policies and the impact of the same on income, employment and social standards in the current globalised scenario.

CO3: Secure insights on the causes, consequences and solutions to economic crises that have occurred in recent times.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 1: Introduction and Essentials
 

The Subject Matter of International Economics; Trade Based on Absolute Advantage; Trade Based on Comparative Advantage; Misconceptions about comparative advantage; Comparative advantage in practice.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
UNIT 2: The Standard Theory of International Trade and Terms of Trade
 

The Basis for and the Gains from Trade with Increasing Costs; Trade Based on Differences in Tastes; The Equilibrium Relative Commodity Price with Trade; Partial Equilibrium Analysis & General Equilibrium Analysis; Terms of trade.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT 3: The Heckscher - Ohlin Theory, Economies of Scale, Imperfect Competition and International Trade
 

Heckscher-Ohlin Theory; Factor-Price Equalization, Effect of Trade on Income Distribution; The Leontief Paradox; Empirical relevance of the H-O theory in the current period; Economies of Scale and International Trade; Imperfect Competition and International Trade-Intra industry trade; Technological gap and Product Cycle models.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 4: Trade Restrictions: Tariffs and Nontariff Trade Barriers
 

Partial Equilibrium Analysis of a Tariff; General Equilibrium Analysis of a Tariff in a Small Country; Import Quotas; Other Non-tariff Barriers; Neo- Protectionism

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT 5: Economic Integration
 

Meaning of Economic Integration, Trade-Creating Customs Unions; Trade-Diverting Customs Unions; The Theory of the Second Best and Other Static Welfare Effects of Customs Unions; ASEAN, SAARC; Multilateralism; WTO; New outlook towards a global trading system.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT 6: The Balance of Payments, Foreign Exchange Rates
 

Balance of Payments: Principles; Disequilibrium in BOP, BOP Crisis in India in 1991 Functions of the Foreign Exchange Markets; Foreign Exchange Rates; Purchasing Power Parity Theory; Stable and Unstable Foreign Exchange Markets. Rupee Convertibility

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:8
UNIT 7: The International Monetary System and Macroeconomic Policy Coordination
 

The Evolution of the Bretton Woods System; The IMF; Policy Coordination with Floating Exchange Rates; The Single Currency and Economic Integration; The European Monetary Union.

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:8
Unit 8: International Economic Issues
 

Financial liberalisation, capital movementsand economic crises. Sustainable trade; Issues in emerging markets, international trade and ethics.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Salvatore, D. (2016). International Economics: Trade and Finance. (12 th ed.). Oxford: John Wiley International Student Edition.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Alder, J., & Wilkinson, D. (1999). International Trade and the Environment: Ethical Issues. In Environmental Law and Ethics(pp. 325-353). Palgrave, London.

Bowen, H., Hollander A. &Viaene J. (2012). Applied International Trade Analysis. London: Macmillan Publication.

Dornbusch , R. (1980).Open Economy Macroeconomics ( International Students Edition). New York: Basic Books.

https://www.pwc.com.br/pt/publicacoes/servicos/assets/consultoria-negocios/emerging-markets-tsp 13.pdf

Kapila, U. (2018). Indian Economy: Performance and Policies. (17 th ed.). New Delhi: Academic Foundation.

Krugman, P., Obstfeld, M. &Melitz,M. (2012). International Economics: Theory and Policy. (9 thed.). New Delhi: Pearson Education.

Lobo, R. (2003). Southeast Asian Crisis: An Economic Analysis. New Delhi: Serials Publication.

Mankiw, G. N. (2012). Principles of Macroeconomics. (6 th ed.). New Delhi: Cengage Learning India.

Marrewijk, C.V. (2007). International Economics: Theory, Application and Policy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

McGee, R. (2016). Ethics in International Trade.

Mihalcea, A. D., &Anghel, l. C. Romanian Capital Market: On the Road Toward an EmergentMarket Status. Challenging the Status Quo in Management and Economics, 168.

Reddy, Y.V. (2011). Global Crisis, Recession and Uneven Recovery. Hyderabad: Orient BlackSwan.

Stiglitz, J. (2016). The Euro and its Threat to the Future of Europe. London: Penguin.

World Summit on Sustainable Development: (2002).Globalization and the Importance of Trade.

Evaluation Pattern

Question Paper Pattern: *MSE and ESE (Max. Marks=50

Section A

Section B

Section C

5*2=10 Marks

6*5=30 Marks

1*!0=10 marks

BSEH533N - BEHAVIOURAL ECONOMICS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course aims to elaborate the principles and methods of behavioral economics, economic decision-making process and role of behavioural science in it and to elaborate the deviation in reality and standard economic theoretical predictions in the framework of behavioral economics. It highlights the importance of cognitive ability, social interaction, moral incentives and emotional responses in explaining human behaviour and economic outcomes.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Students should become familiar with the most important contributions to behavioural economics

CO2: Critically assess the importance of such findings in explanation of economic behaviour and outcomes.

CO3: Understand the framework of choice under risk and uncertainty.

CO4: Learn the role of behavioural economics in public policy

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Behavioural economics: An introduction
 

Introduction to Behavioral Economics Origins of Behavioral Economics, Decision-making under Neo-classical economic framework- rationality, optimization Role of Intuition, Emotions, Beliefs in decision making Bounded Rationality

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:17
Cognitive process in decision making
 

Values; Preferences and Choices; the standard model; Axioms, assumptions and definitions; The neuro scientific basis of utility. Beliefs; Heuristics and Biases; The standard model; Probability estimation; Self-evaluation bias- Projection bias- Causes of irrationality Judgment under Risk & Uncertainty: Heuristics & Biases Heuristics : Representativeness, Substitution, Availability, Affect, Anchoring, framing Biases: Cognitive and emotional biases

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:16
Risk and Uncertainty
 

Choice Under Risk & Uncertainty Expected Utility Prospect Theory – Reference Points – Risk Concept and Understanding – Loss Aversion – Shape of Utility Function – Decision Weighting– Probabilistic Judgment. Mental Accounting Framing Mental Accounts Fungibility & Labels Hedonic Editing.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Theory of intertemporal choice
 

Intertemporal Choice, Temporal Choice, Construal Level Theory, Valuation of Delayed Consumption Preferences for Sequences of Outcomes, Hyberbolic Discounting, Preference Reversal 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Behavioral economics in the context of public policy
 

Behavioral Game Theory Social preferences: Fairness, trust, cooperation, reciprocity, Norms Limited Strategic Thinking Choice architecture: Nudge, Nudge vs. boost, Behavioral public policy.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Sanjit Dhami, "The Foundations of Behavioral Economic Analysis", Oxford University Press (2016)

Behavioral Economics: Toward a New Economics by Integration with Traditional Economics by Ogaki, Masao, Tanaka, Saori C. Published by Springer, ISBN 978-981-10-6439-5

Nick Wilkinson; Matthias Klaes(2012), An Introduction to Behavioral Economics, 2nd Edition, Palgrave Macmillan.

World Development Report 2015: Mind, Society, and Behavior

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Erik Angner, “A Course in Behavioral Economics”, Palgrave Macmillan

M. Altman, Handbook of Contemporary Behavioural Economics: Foundation and Developments (2007), Prentice Hall India

E. Cartwright, Behavioural Economics (2011), Routledge

D. Kahneman, Thinking Fast and Slow (2011), Allen Lane, Penguin Books

G. Loewenstein, Exotic Preferences: Behavioural Economics and Human Motivation (2007), Oxford University Press

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage 

20

25

20

30

5

Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

BSEH541BN - ADVANCED ECONOMETRICS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to some of the advanced econometric concepts and techniques. The course begins with an introduction to lag modelling and covers distributed as well as dynamic models. Then the students will be introduced to the world of Simultaneous Equation Models and deals in depth with the isse of simultaneity and its solutions. The students will then be introduced to the analysis of two major types of data used in econometric analysis viz. time series and panel data. The course also covers different approaches to econometric forecasting. Some of the important testing procedures such as Granger Causality, Unit root tests, Seasonality tests, Structural break test, Cointgration test and Model stability tests will be introduced to the students during this course.

 

Course Objectives

The course aims at providing students with:

  • A comprehensive introduction to some of the advanced econometric concepts and techniques.
  • The ability to apply advanced econometric techniques in the investigation of complex economic relationships using time series and panel data.
  • The skills to make economic forecasting.

Learning Outcome

CO1: For the construction and estimation of lag models and simultaneous equation models.

CO2: To apply econometric techniques for the analysis of time series and panel data.

CO3: To analyse each economic problem in depth

CO4: To do not only the estimation of the model and testing of the hypotheses, but also perform post-estimation diagnostics and see how well the model performs.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:16
Dynamic Econometric Models
 

Lags in econometric models; Distributed lag model; Autoregressive lag model; Reasons for lags; Estimation of distributed-lag model, The Koyck Approach to distributed-lag model; Rationalisation of koyck model: The adaptive expectations model, partial adjustment model; Estimation of autoregressive models; The method of instrument variable (IV); Causality in economics: The granger causality test.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Simultaneous-Equation Models
 

Nature of simultaneousequations models; Simultaneous equation bias; Structural models; Reduced form models; Identification problem; Rules of identification; Tests for simultaneity and exogeneity; Method of indirect least squares (ILS); Method of two-stage least squares.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Time Series Econometrics: Basic Concepts
 

Introduction to time series; Stationary and nonstationary time series; Spurious regression; Unit root tests: Dickey fuller and Augmented dickey fuller tests; Transforming nonstationary time series; Cointegration: Testing for cointegration, error correction mechanism.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Time Series Econometrics: Forecasting
 

Approaches to economic forecasting; ARIMA models; The Box-Jenkins methodology; Vector autoregression; Forecasting with VAR; Testing causality using VAR.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Panel Data Regression Model
 

Introduction to panel data; Constant coefficient model; Fixed effect LSDV model; Fixed effect WG model; Random effects model, Properties of estimators.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Gujarati, D. N. (2016). Econometrics by Example (2nd ed.). New Delhi: Palgrave.

Gujarati, D. N., Porter, D.C., &Gunasekar, S. (2017). Basic Econometrics. (5th ed.). New Delhi: McGraw Hill.

Studenmund, A. H. (2016). Using Econometrics: A Practical Guide. (7th ed.). New Delhi:  Pearson.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Enders, W. (2013). Applied Econometric Time Series (3rd ed.). New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Greene, W. H. (2003). Econometric Analysis (5th ed.). New Delhi: Pearson Education.

Hamilton, J. D. (1994). Time Series Analysis. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Koutsoyiannis, A. (1973). Theory of Econometrics. New York: Harper & Row.

Pindyck, R. S., &Rubinfeld, D. L. (1990). Econometric Models and Econometric Forecasts (4th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

Wooldridge, J. M. (2002). Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data. Massachusetts: MIT Press.

 

Evaluation Pattern

EvaluationPattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

Weightage

20

25

20

30

05

* Mid Semester Exam      ** End Semester Exam

BSEH581N - INTERNSHIP (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

One of the requirements of BSc. Economics (Honours) students at CHRIST (Deemed to be University) is the ability to apply theoretical knowledge acquired in their course in practical applications. Hence, the students are expected to complete a short summer internship during the summer break after the fourth semester as part of the course curriculum. Having undergone extensive understanding/training in Economic theories, Mathematical Methods, Statistics, Research Methodology, Basic and Applied Econometrics, this course enables students to demonstrate an understanding of how to apply theoretical knowledge to practice in differentorganizations/institutions of their choice. 

Course Objectives

  • To inculcate in students the rigour of empirical studies.
  • To imbibe in students the spirit of inquiry.
  • To encourage students to demonstrate the ability to apply theoretical knowledge in practical real-life problems.
  • To exercise the acquired skills in practical application(s), and
  • To gain industry experience

Learning Outcome

CO1: To identify potential research area(s) and career options;

CO2: To formulate a research problem statement;

CO3: To identify the necessary types and sources of data;

CO4: To identify tools for analyzing the data;

CO5: To interpret the findings;

CO6: To gain industry experience in applying theories/approaches

CO7: To gain skill sets required to conduct independent research (Dissertation work)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
nil
 

nil

Text Books And Reference Books:

The students are expected to identify and communicate to the organization/institution where they want to pursue their internship, and the same should be communicated to the Economics cluster and get it approved prior to the commencement of the internship. As a requirement, the studentshave to submit a letter of confirmation of their internship from the interning organization/institution. After successful completion of the internship, the students should submit a final Internship Report and Blue book (internship diary) for evaluation (includes viva-voce examination).

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Readings & references given by the respective organisations

Evaluation Pattern

Particulars

Marks

 

BLUE-BOOK   (50 % Weightage)

 

 

Nature of work

10 marks

 

Effective usage of Blue Book (Internship Diary)

05 marks

 

Effective usage of time / Mentor’s Evaluation

05 marks

 

Internship Certificate (Completion Certificate)

05 marks

 

Sub Total

 

25 Marks

VIVA-VOCE EXAM   (50 % Weightage

 

 

Presentation 

10 marks

 

Learning outcome(s) / Skill set(s) acquired

05 marks

 

Final report

05 marks

 

Q&A

05 marks

 

Sub Total

 

25 Marks

Grand Total

 

50 Marks

BSEH631N - PUBLIC ECONOMICS (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

The paper deals with the nature of government intervention and its implications for allocation, distribution and stabilization. Inherently, this study involves a formal analysis of government taxation and expenditures. This paper combines a thorough understanding of fiscal institutions with a careful analysis of the issues which underline budgetary policies in general and Indian experience in particular.

 

Course Objectives

·  To provide the students with in-depth understanding of public debt, government taxation and expenditures.

·      To provide students with a thorough understanding of the theories governing public finance.

Learning Outcome

CO1: The students will be able to understand the various theories governing public finance and shall gain a thorough understanding about government policies on taxation, debt and expenditure.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Role of Government in Organised Society
 

The nature, scope and significance of public economics; Public vs Private Finance; Principle of Maximum Social advantage: Approaches and Limitations- Functions of Government; Economic functions; allocation, distribution and stabilization; Regulatory functions of the Government and its economic significance.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:14
Public Goods and Public Sector
 

Concept of public goods-characteristics of public goods, national vs. local public goods; determination of provision of public good; Externality: concept of social versus private costs and benefits, merit goods, club goods; Provision versus production of public goods; Market failure and public Provision.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Taxation
 

Concept of tax; types; canons of taxation; Incidence of taxes; Taxable capacity; Approaches to the principle of Equity in taxation; Ability to Pay principle; Benefit Approach; Sources of Public Revenue; VAT; Goods and Services Tax.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:17
Public Expenditure and Public Debt
 

Structure and growth of public expenditure; Wagner’s Law of increasing state activities; Wiseman-Peacock hypothesis; Pure theory of public expenditure; Trends of Public expenditure; Subsidies in India; Concepts of public debt; Sources and effects of public debt; Methods of debt redemption - Growth of India’s public debt.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:17
Government Budget and Policy
 

Government budget and its structure – Receipts and   expenditure - concepts of current and capital account; balanced, surplus, and deficit budgets; concept of budget deficit vs. fiscal deficit; functional classification of budget; Budget, government policy and its impact; Budget multipliers; Principle of federal finance: Different layers of the government; Inter governmental  Transfer; horizontal vs. vertical equity; Theory of Grants; Finance Commission.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Bagchi, A. (2005). Readings in Public Finance. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Jha, R. (2010). Modern Public Economics (2nd ed.). London: Routledge.

Musgrave, R. A., & Musgrave, P. B. (2004). Public Finance in Theory and Practice (5th ed.). New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Atkinson, A., & Stiglitz, J. E. (2015). Lectures on Public Economics. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Basu, K. (2016). An Economist in the Real World: The Art of Policymaking in India. New Delhi: Viking books.

Cullis, J., & Jones, P. (2009). Public Finance & Public Choice (3rd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.

Hyman, D. N. (2011). Public Finance: A Contemporary Application of Theory to Policy (10thed.). Boston: Cengage Learning.

Jalan, J., Marjit. S., &Santra, S. (2016). India Public Finance and Policy Report 2016: Fiscal Issues and Macro Economy. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Rao, M. G. (2010). Public Economics: Theory and Policy – Essays in Honor of AmareshBagchi. New Delhi: Sage India.

Stiglitz. J. E., & Rosengard, J. K. (2015), Economics of the Public Sector (4th ed.). New Delhi: W. W. Norton & Co Inc.

Ulbrich, H. H. (2003). Public Finance: In Theory and Practice. London: Thomson Learning.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE

Attendance

Weightage 

20

25

20

30

05

BSEH632N - OPERATIONS RESEARCH (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic concepts, theories and models of economics, which are relevant to business.

Course Objectives

1. Solve Linear Programming Problems

2. Solve Transportation and Assignment Problems

3. Understand the mathematical tools that are needed to solve optimisation problems.

4. Understand the usage of game theory and Simulation for Solving Business Problems

Learning Outcome

CO1: The students will acquainted with the basic concepts of operation research.

CO2: They will be able to enhance the efficiency in terms of operation aspect of organisation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Operation Research
 

Meaning and scope – Characteristics – models in OR. Linear Programming (LP) - Formulation of Models Diverse Problems – Graphical Explanation of Solution -Maximisation / Minimisation– Simplex method- Big M Method application in Business – merits and Demerits.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Transportation model
 

Basic feasible solution – formulation, solving a TP. Assignment Problem (AP) - Concepts, Formulation of Model, Hungarian Method of Solution, Maximisation / Minimisation, Balanced / Unbalanced, Prohibited Assignments - Problems.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Network analysis
 

Work break down analysis – construction – numbering of event. Time Calculation – critical path, slack, float – application.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
Queuing models
 

Elements of queuing system – characteristics of queuing model. Queues in Series and Parallel. Problems based on the results of Single Channel Queue with Poisson Arrival Rate.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Decision theory
 

Statement of Bayes’ theorem application. Probability – decision trees. Game theory meaning and characteristics – saddle point – Dominance property.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hillier, Frederick S. & Lieberman, “Introduction to Operations Research Concepts and Cases”, 2010, 8th Ed. TMH

N.D. Vohra, “Quantitative Techniques in Management”, 2010, 4thEd.TMH.

J.K. Sharma, “Operations Research Theory and Applications 2009, 4th Ed. McMillan.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Kasana, HS & Kumar, KD, “Introductory Operations Research theory and Applications”, 2008, Springer.

Chakravarty, P, “Quantitative Methods for Management and Economics”, 2009, 1st Ed. HPH.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA1

MSE* (CIA2)

CIA3

ESE**

Attendance

 

Weightage

 

20

25

20

30

05

 

Question Paper Pattern: *MSE and ESE (Max. Marks=50

Section A

Section B

Section C

5*2=10 Marks

6*5=30 Marks

1*!0=10 marks

BSEH633N - DISSERTATION (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:75
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:5

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

One of the requirements of Economics Honours students at CHRIST is the ability to conducted independent research under the guidance of a faculty. Having undergone extensive training in research methodology, statistics and econometrics, this course enables students to demonstrate an understanding of how to apply theoretical knowledge to practice by investigating and careful evaluation of real-life problems.

The dissertation should be a minimum of 10,000 words in length (or approximately 35 pages).The word count includes the text, table, quotations, footnotes, title, table of content, and appendices. Abstract is excluded from the word count.

Course Objectives

 To inculcate in students the rigour of research work.

 To imbibe in students the spirit of inquiry.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: To identify research topics/areas

CO2: To formulate a research problem statement

CO3: To identify the sources and types of reference materials

CO4: To carry out effective review of literature

CO5: To formulate research questions, objectives and hypotheses

CO6: To identify the necessary types and sources of data

CO7: To identify tools for analyzing the data

CO8: To interpret the findings

CO9: To suggest recommendations and policies for solving the problems studied

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:75
NIL
 

NIL

Text Books And Reference Books:

The dissertation work is carried out under the guidance of a faculty with scheduled meetings for discussion of the progress of the work and timely interim presentations before a panel of faculty to assess the quality of the work. The final submission of the dissertation is followed by a viva voce on the topic of the research.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

readings/ journal articles related to the dissertation topic

Evaluation Pattern

Particulars

Marks

Proposal

15 marks

Interaction with the guide

15 marks

Dissertation Diary

10 marks

Interim Presentation

10 marks

Thesis

25 marks

Defense

25 marks

Total

100 marks