Department of BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT NCR

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Business Administration (FinTech Honours)
Academic Year  (2021)

 
1 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN121N ADDITIONAL ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
BBA131 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA132 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA133 MICRO ECONOMICS Core Courses 4 4 50
BBFT111N OVERVIEW OF FINANCIAL MARKETS AND CAPITAL MARKETS Skill Enhancement Course 2 0 0
BBFT134N BUSINESS MATHEMATICS Core Courses 4 4 100
BBFT135N INTRODUCTION TO FINTECH Core Courses 4 4 100
BECO191AN INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY Generic Elective 3 3 100
BECO191BN ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION Generic Elective 3 3 95
BPSY191AN SCIENCE OF WELLNESS Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPSY191BN ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY Generic Elective 3 3 100
ENG121N ENGLISH - I Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 100
ENG191AN INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES Generic Elective 3 3 100
ENG191BN DIGITAL HUMANITIES Generic Elective 3 3 100
HIN122N HINDI Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 50
2 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
AEN221N ADDITIONAL ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 100
BBA231 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA232 BUSINESS STATISTICS Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA233 MACRO ECONOMICS Core Courses 4 4 100
BBFT211N FOUNDATIONS IN QUANTITATIVE FINANCE Skill Enhancement Course 2 2 100
BBFT212N WORKING WITH SPREADSHEETS Skill Enhancement Course 2 3 100
BBFT234N FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND SERVICES Core Courses 4 4 100
BBFT281N SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY PROJECT Skill Enhancement Course 1 1 100
BECO291BN DESINGING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Generic Elective 3 3 100
BECO291CN ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS AND ITS INTERLINKAGE WITH INDUSTRY Generic Elective 3 3 100
BENG291BN GLOBAL ETHICS FOR CONTEMPORARY SOCIETIES Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPSY291AN APPRECIATING AESTHETICS Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPSY291BN HUMAN ENGINEERING AND ERGONOMICS Generic Elective 3 3 100
ENG221N ENGLISH - II Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 100
ENG291AN CREATIVE WRITING Generic Elective 3 3 100
HIN222N HINDI Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 3 50
3 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA331 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA332 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA333 MARKETING MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BBFT311N STRUCTURED QUERY LANGUAGE Skill Enhancement Course 3 3 100
BBFT334N INSURANCE AND RISK MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BBFT351N PYTHON FOR FINANCE Core Courses 4 4 100
BBFT361BN INNOVATION AND CREATIVITY IN BUSINESS Generic Elective 3 3 100
BBFT381N INDUSTRY REVIEW PROJECT Skill Enhancement Course 2 1 50
4 Semester - 2020 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBA431 COST AND MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA432 ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BBA433 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Core Courses 4 4 100
BBFT411N FINANCIAL MODELLING Skill Enhancement Course 3 3 100
BBFT434N SECURITY ANALYSIS AND PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT Core Courses 4 4 100
BBFT435N FINTECH ETHICS AND RISKS Core Courses 4 4 100
BBFT451N INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS ANALYTICS Core Courses 4 4 100
BBFT461AN FUNDAMENTALS OF AI AND MACHINE LEARNING Generic Elective 3 3 100
      

    

Department Overview:

School of Business and Management offers business education through Undergraduate, Graduate, M.Phil, and Doctoral programs under different management streams. The curriculum and Pedagogy integrate rigorous academic theory with real-life challenges and is geared to equip the students to successfully face the challenges of a long career in the world of uncertainty. The faculty composition has a healthy mix of Academicians and Industry Practitioners. Our faculty members’ scholastic excellence is depicted through their publications in renowned peer-reviewed journals. The holistic approach of learning through various programs and quality improvement activities ensure students bloom and succeed in this competitive world. As a Business School, we believe our pedagogy enables, engages, exemplifies, and encourages students to make effective business decisions. The curriculum design provides students with the best opportunities to be well-rounded managers and business leaders. We offer experiential learning for our students through an array of activities like Social Responsibility Projects, Industry Review Projects, Organisation Structure Study, Outbound Training, Book Review Competition, Summer Internships, Current Affairs and Weekly Presentations, Skill Enhancement Programmes and Dissertation. We handhold our students through our mentoring sessions. We offer our students the best of opportunities and a launching pad for careers.

Mission Statement:

Our vision is to be an institution of excellence developing leaders serving enterprises and society globally. Our mission is to develop socially responsible business leaders with the spirit of inquiry through academic and industry engagement.

Introduction to Program:

The undergraduate programme in Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance Technology (BBA Fin-Tech) honours is offered by the School of Business and Management at the Delhi NCR Campus to prepare young minds with a keen interest in finance to take up challenging positions in the financial segment.

Program Objective:

Programme Outcome/Programme Learning Goals/Programme Learning Outcome:

PO1: To provide high quality professional education in the domain of finance to management students.

PO2: To prepare students to meet the challenges posed by the technological disruptions of the 21st century in the finance domain

PO3: To focus on the holistic development of the student with conceptual clarity, analytical ability, critical thinking and communication skills.

PO4: To prepare young minds with a positive attitude for excellence in academics and committed to serving the society

PO5: To facilitate the professional journey of students by providing them with the in-depth of knowledge required to make a mark in the financial services sector.

PO6: To develop Fin-Tech professionals who are able to leverage the knowledge acquired here to dive deep into the challenging world of Financial technology. Programme Outcome:

PO7: Holistically developed management graduates ready to meet the emerging challenges in the global economy in general and more specifically the financial segment

PO8: Graduates who have conceptual clarity, analytical ability, critical thinking and communication skills

PO9: Employable graduates with the Fin-Tech based skills

PO10: Graduates who are confident and equipped with the right knowledge, skills and attitudes

PO11: Graduates who are able to leverage their learning to occupy challenging roles as Financial Analyst, Cyber security Analyst, Block Chain Analyst, Risk Analyst, Compliance Analyst, Financial Consultant etc., in the Fin-Tech space

Assesment Pattern

70% CIA and 30% End Semester Exam

 

Examination And Assesments

Examination : Mid Semester Exam and End Semester Exam

 

Assessments: Assignments, Roleplays, Case Studies, MCQ,Reports etc.

 

AEN121N - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Additional English course is offered as a second language course and seeks to introduce the students to the nuances of English literature in its varied forms and genres. The students who choose Additional English are generally proficient in the English language. Hence, instead of focusing on introducing them to language, challenging texts in terms of ideas, form, and technique are chosen. Additional English as a course is designed for students in place of a regional language. Non-Resident Indians (NRIs), foreign nationals and students who have not taken Hindi, Kannada, Tamil or French at the Plus 2 or Class XII levels are eligible to choose Additional English. The course is taught for students from different streams, namely, BA, BSc, BCom, and BBA in the first year and for BA, BSc and BCom (Regular) in the second year.

The first year syllabus is an attempt by the Department of English, Christ University to recognize and bring together the polyphonic Indian and Indian sub-continental voices in English in English translation for the Additional English students of the first year. This effort aims to familiarize the students with regional literatures in translation, Indian Writing in English (IWE) and literatures from Pakistan, Nepal and Srilanka, thereby, enabling the students to learn more about Indian culture and ethos through writings from different regions of the country. We have tried to represent in some way or the other the corners of India and the Indian sub-continent in this microcosmic world of short stories, poems and essays

 

There is a prescribed text bookfor the first year students, compiled by the Department of English, Christ University and intended for private circulation.

The first semester has a variety of writing from India, Pakistan and Nepal. The various essays, short stories and poems deal with various socio-economic, cultural and political issues that are relevant to modern day India and the Indian sub-continent and will enable students to comprehend issues of identity-politics, caste, religion, class, and gender. All of the selections either in the manner of their writing, the themes they deal with or the ideologies that govern them are contemporary in relevance and sensibility, whether written by contemporary writers or earlier writers. An important addition to this syllabus is the preponderance of North-Eastern writing which was hitherto not well represented. Excerpts from interviews, autobiographical writings, sports and city narratives are added to this section to introduce students to the varied genres of literature.

The objectives of this course are

to expose students to the rich literary and cultural diversity of  Indian literatures

to sensitise students on the social, political, historical and cultural ethos that has shaped the nation- INDIA

to enable to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of Indian writing, of which this compilation is just a passing glance

to learn and appreciate India through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts (BhashaUtsav will be an intrinsic help in this endeavour)

  

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Sensitive to cultural, social, religious and ethnic diversities and help them engage with their peers and all around them in a more understanding and ?educated? manner.

CO2: It will also enable them through the activities conducted to become more proactive citizens/participants in society.

CO3: Aware of the dynamics of gender, identity, communalism and politics of this vast nation through its literature.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Poetry
 

1.      Keki N Daruwala     “Migrations”

 

2.      Kamala Das            “Forest Fire”

 

3.      Agha Shahid Ali      “Snow on the Desert”

 

4.      Eunice D Souza       “Marriages are Made”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

1.      Rabindranath Tagore    “Babus of Nayanjore”

 

2.      Ruskin Bond  “He said it with Arsenic”

 

3.      Bhisham Sahni       “The Boss Came to Dinner”

 

4.      N. Kunjamohan Singh    “The Taste of Hilsa”

 

5.      Mohan Thakuri                “Post Script”

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Essays
 

1.      Mahatma Gandhi       “What is True Civilization?” (Excerpts from Hind Swaraj)

 

2.      Ela Bhatt                    “Organising for Change”

 

3.      Sitakant Mahapatra     “Beyond the Ego: New Values for a Global Neighborhood

 

4.      B R Ambedkar             “Waiting for A Visa”

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Contemporary knowledge of the soci-political situation in the sub-continent

The text book copy "Reading Diversity"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

On-line resources to appreciate the text through the Comprehension Questions

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1:  Classroom assignment for 20 marks keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

CIA 2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any proactive            creative assignments that might help students engage with India as a cultural space. This is to be done keeping in mind the objectives and learning outcomes of the course.

Question Paper Pattern

Mid Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total                  50

 

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 4 x 5 = 20

Section B: 2 x 15= 30

Total                   50

BBA131 - PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 The dynamic business environment compels managers to perform a challenging role in steering the organizations’ success to new heights. This comprehensive introductory course has been designed to provide valuable insights into the functions of modern-day managers. By tracing the historical evolution of management thought, it explores the basic concepts, principles and theories of management. It orients the learners towards basic understanding of managerial functions like planning, organizing, staffing, motivation, communication, controlling and supervision. By focusing on the contemporary challenges faced by organizations in recent years, it enables the proponents to cater to global needs and gather skills that ensures employability and sustainability in the corporate world.

  • To outline the fundamental activities of managers

  • To explain the basic concepts, principles and theories of management 

  • To examine the broad functions of management

  • To propose initiatives to address the contemporary social issues and challenges in the field of management 

  • To determine ethical workplace practices

 

 

 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate understanding of the role of managers in an organization

CO2: Summarize the elementary concepts, principles and theories of management

CO3: Examine the managerial functions having an impact on the organizational effectiveness

CO4: Discuss initiatives to address the contemporary issues and challenges in management

CO5: Assess ethical workplace practices

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT
 

Definition – nature, process and significance of management – Role of managers – Managerial Skills and Roles - Evolution of Management Thought: Classical Management Approaches, Behavioral Management Approaches, Quantitative Management Approach, Modern Management Approaches - Management as a Science or Art - Management as a profession- Administration and Management- Functions of Management – Functional Areas of Management. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
PLANNING AND DECISION MAKING
 

Planning - Nature and Importance of Planning- Types of Plans - Levels of Planning - Steps in planning - Making Effective Plans- Objectives and Management By Objective (MBO) –Management By Exception (MBE) - Policy and Strategy- Forecasting and Decision Making - Nature of decision making - Types of decisions – Decision Making Process – Rational Perspectives and Behavioral Aspects of decision making.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
ORGANIZING
 

Organizing - Nature and purpose - Principles of Organization - Types of Organization - Organizational Structure and Design – Line, Staff and functional authority – Conflict between Line and Staff – Overcoming the Line-Staff Conflict. Departmentation - Span of control – Authority, Responsibility and Accountability - Principles of Delegation - Steps - Centralization Vs Decentralization – Factors determining the degree of Decentralization of authority.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
STAFFING
 

Staffing - Nature and Purpose of staffing – Importance of staffing – Components of Staffing - Manpower planning - Recruitment and Selection - Training and Development - Performance Appraisal.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
DIRECTING
 

Directing – Nature of Directing function - Principles – Importance of Effective Direction – Motivating people at work – Early motivational theories, Leadership and change - Effective Communication skills for directing – Barriers of communication

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:7
CONTROLLING AND SUPERVISION
 

 

Controlling - Concept, Nature and Importance - Essentials of Control - Requirements of an Effective Control System – Behavioral Implications of Control – Techniques of Managerial control - Co-ordination – Need for co-ordination – Types of Co-ordination - Techniques of Coordination - Cooperation. Supervision – Position of a supervisor – Qualities of good – Essential requirements of effective supervision.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
CONTEMPORARY ISSUES AND CHALLENGES IN MANAGEMENT OF 21st CENTURY
 

Total quality management, Work force diversity, Globalization and innovation, Enterprise mobility, how to manage and control virtual teams, creating an ethical workplace.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Daft, R. L. (2009). Principles of Management (1st edition), Cengage Learning.

  2. Gupta, R.S., Sharma, B.D., & Bhalla. N.S. (2011). Principles & Practices of Management (11th edition). New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers. 

  3. Williams. Management, (International edition) South-western Cengage Learning.

  4. John R. Schermerhorn. Management, Wiley-India

  5. Koontz, H., &Weihrich, H.  Essentials of Management, McGraw Hill Publishers.

  6. L M Prasad, (2007). Principles and Practices of Management, Himalaya Publishing House

  7. Rao, P.S. (2009). Principles of Management, Himalaya Publishing House.

  8. Moshal, B.S. Principles of Management, Ane Books.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

 

Component of Final Grade

Max Marks per Component

Weightage towards Final Grade

Total Marks per Component in Final Grade

CIA-I 

20

20 %

20

CIA-II

50

25 %

25

CIA-III 

20

20%

20

End – Term

50

30 %

30

Attendance

5

5 %

5

Total

   

100

BBA132 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course intends to introduce basic accounting principles and practices. It also deals with subsidiary books maintained in business organizations. The students will have knowledge about the fundamental accounting processes such as journalizing, ledger posting, preparation of trial balance and final accounts in sole trading business. It also deals with providing an overview of accounting standards and IFRS. This course will be useful for all those who are desirous of having an understanding and application of financial dynamics of the business and become successful financial managers/entrepreneurs. 

 

Course Objectives:

  • To provide an understanding of application of various principles and practice of Accounting.
  • To demonstrate the knowledge on the process of accounting cycle and basic steps involved in Accounting.
  • To extend the knowledge of systematic maintenance of books of accounts to real life business.
  • To estimate Annual Financial statements of Sole proprietorship form of business.
  • To outline the need for Accounting standards and IFRS.

 

 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Identify the application of various principles and practice of Accounting in preparation of accounting statements

CO2: Demonstrate the knowledge on the process of accounting cycle.

CO3: Extend the knowledge of systematic maintenance of books of accounts to real life business

CO4: Estimate Annual Financial statements of Sole proprietorship form of business.

CO5: Outline the need for Accounting standards and IFRS

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Accounting
 

Meaning, Need for accounting, Internal and External users of accounting information, limitations of accounting, accounting Concepts and Conventions, Accounting Practices, Generally Accepted Accounting Principles.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Accounting systems & process
 

Nature of Accounting, Accounting equation - Systems of Accounting, Process of Accounting transactions- types of Accounts, Rules of Accounting. Journal - Meaning, features, simple and compound entries, Including recording of GST transactions, Capital and revenue expenditures, Capital and revenue receipts, Contingent assets and contingent liabilities, Preparation of ledgers and Trial balance.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Subsidiary books
 

Conceptual introduction to subsidiary books - Sales book, Sales return book, Purchases book, Purchase returns book, receivable book, payable book. Practical problems in Cash Book- Single column, double column, and three columnar cash book.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Bank reconciliation statement
 

Need for reconciliation and preparation of bank reconciliation statement.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Rectification of Errors
 

Need for rectification of errors, types of errors, process of rectification and accounting entries of rectification.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:12
Final Accounts
 

Preparation of Trading and Profit and Loss account and Balance Sheet of sole trading concerns.

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:4
Accounting standards and IFRS
 

Types of Accounting standards, Need for IFRS, Ind AS and IFRS.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Jain S.P.,& Narang K L. (2020). Basic Financial Accounting I, New Dehli, Kalyani publishers.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Maheshwari, S.N., &Maheshwari, S.K. (2020). Advanced Accountancy1, New Delhi: Jain Book Agency.
  2. Shukla, M. (2020). Advanced Accounts, New Delhi, S Chand Group
  3. Radhaswamy, M & Gupta, R.L. (2020).Advanced Accountancy 2, New Delhi, Sultan Chand & Sons.
  4. Reddy, A. (2020). Fundamentals of Accounting, New Delhi, Himalaya Publishing House
  5. Gupta, A. (2020). Financial Accounting for Management: An Analytical Perspective, Noida, Pearson Education.
  6. Raman, B. S. (2014). Financial Accounting (1stedi).I & II, New Dehli:United Publishers.
  7. Porter, G.A., & Norton, C.L. (2013). Financial Accounting (IFRS update)( 6thedi), Cengage Learning.
  8. Jawahar Lal & Seema Srivastava (2013). Financial Accounting  New Delhi:Himalaya Publishing House.
  9. Arora M. N. (2013). Accounting For Management. New Delhi: Himalaya Publishing House.
  10. Bhattacharya .(2013). Essentials of Financial Accounting (Based on IFRS) (2ndedi), Prentice Hall India.
Evaluation Pattern

Component of Final Grade

Max Marks per Component

Weightage towards Final Grade

Total Marks per Component in Final Grade

CIA-I (10 + 10)

20

20 %

20

CIA-II

50

25 %

25

CIA-III (10 + 10)

20

20 %

20

End – Term

50

30 %

30

Attendance

5

5 %

5

Total

   

100

BBA133 - MICRO ECONOMICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:50
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

 

 

This common core course helps students to think in the economic way of establishing a connection between unlimited wants and limited resources available to an individual, firm and the society.  It deals with the application of economic analysis in formulation of business decisions.  In this context, the course deals with demand, supply, pricing, theory of consumer choice, theories of production and market structures.

 

Course Objectives: This course aims to help students to:

·       Describe how economic trade-offs and social values impact business decisions.

·       Understand the causes and consequences of different market conditions.

·       Explain the theory of consumer choice using the utility concepts.

·       Make use of the concept of market equilibrium in business decisions.

·       Analyse cost of production and revenue of business operations.

·       Evaluate the market outcome(s) under different market structure.

Learning Outcome

Course Learning Outcomes: On having completed this course student should be able to:

CLO1   Describe how economic trade-offs and social values impact business decisions.

CLO2   Understand the causes and consequences of different market conditions

CLO3 Explain the theory of consumer choice using the utility concepts.

CLO4 Make use of the concept of market equilibrium in business decisions.

CLO5 Analyse cost of production and revenue of business operations

CLO6 Evaluate the market outcome(s) under different market structure

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Basic Concepts
 

Ten Principles of Economics: How People Make Decisions - How people Interact - How the Economy as a Whole Works; Thinking Like an Economist - Role of Observations, Theory and Assumptions in Economics; Role of Economic models - The Circular Flow Diagram - Production Possibility Frontier - Opportunity Cost; Central Problems of an Economy; Microeconomics and Macroeconomics

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
The Basics of Supply and Demand
 

Markets and Competition; Demand - Law of Demand, Exceptions to the Law - Market Demand - Changes in Demand; Supply - Law of Supply, Exceptions to the Law - Market Supply - Changes in Supply; Equilibrium – Steps - Changes in Equilibrium.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Elasticity and its Application
 

Elasticity of Demand - Price Elasticity and Its Determinants - Methods of Measurement - Degrees of Price Elasticity - Total Revenue and Price elasticity; Income Elasticity Demand; Cross Elasticity Demand; Elasticity of Supply-Determinants - Measurement and Degrees.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Theory of Consumer Behavior
 

Utility - Characteristics and Types - Cardinal and ordinal Utility analysis – Law of Diminishing Marginal utility; Budget Constraint; Indifference curves - Properties, Consumer’s equilibrium - Price Effect - Income Effect and Substitution Effect.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Market Efficiency and Externalities
 

Consumers, Producers and the Efficiency of the Markets: Consumers surplus (Marshall) - Producer surplus and Market efficiency; Externalities and Market Inefficiency - Negative and Positive.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Theory of Production and Cost
 

Production Function; Law of Variable Proportions; Law of returns, Economies of Scale; Iso-quants and Iso-cost lines. Cost Function - Important Cost Concepts; Short Run and Long Run Cost 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:12
Market Structure and Competitive Strategy
 

Market structure - Perfect Competition - Price and Output Determination - Role of Time Element in Market Price Determination; Monopoly - Price and output determination, Price Discrimination; Monopolistic Competition - Price and Output Determination-Selling Costs - Product Differentiation – Oligopoly - Duopoly Example - Price Determination (Collusive Pricing, Price Leadership).

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Gregory Mankiw, N. (2016), Principles of Economics, 8th Edition, Cengage Learning India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Robert S Pindyck and Daniel L Rubinfeld (2013), Microeconomics, 8th Edition, New York: Pearson.

2.     Salvatore, D. (2011). Managerial Economics in a Global Economy (7th ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

 

 

3. Sen, Anindy (2006). Microeconomics: Theory and application (2nd ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Component of Final Grade

Max Marks per Component

Weightage towards Final Grade

Total Marks per Component in Final Grade

CIA-I 

20

20 %

20

CIA-II

50

25 %

25

CIA-III (10 + 10)

20

20%

20

End – Term

50

30 %

30

Attendance

5

5 %

5

Total

   

100

BBFT111N - OVERVIEW OF FINANCIAL MARKETS AND CAPITAL MARKETS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:0
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The objective of this course is to provide comprehensive coverage of Financial Markets and Capital Markets from a global practical perspective

          To familiarize the students with the structure and various instruments of Financial and Capital markets from a global perspective.

          To enhance knowledge of the learners comprehensively in the forex market.

          To enrich the learners with the comprehensive knowledge about the Equity markets, Debt & Money Markets

          To enhance knowledge of the learners in analysing various asset classes including bond prices and yield curve analysis

To augment the knowledge of the students related to global fund management industry

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate understanding of various Financial markets and investment avenues.

CO2: Extend the concept of various Financial markets and investment avenues in the global market.

CO3: Identify the use of derivatives to hedge Foreign exchange risk and global hedge funds.

CO4: Analyze fixed income securities in terms of bond Pricing and yield curve analysis from global perspectives.

CO5: Examine money market instruments from a global perspective.

CO6: Compare and contrast various managed funds in a global setting.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Overview of Financial Markets And Assets Classes
 

Cash and Money Markets, Bond markets, Foreign Exchange Markets, Equities Markets, Indices and Stocks, Derivatives Markets, Products and Settlement, Commodities Markets and Products, Saving and Investment Products, Mutual Fund and other Investment Products

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Global Equities Markets and Instruments
 

Introduction to Equity Market-Introduction to Capital Markets, Equity Capital Markets, Raising Equity Through IPO, Raising Equity Through Private Sources, Equity buybacks, de-listing and reversion to a ‘private’ company. Equity Instruments & their characteristics-Stock Prices and Corporate Actions, Preference Shares, Depository Receipts, Rights Issues & Warrants, Convertibles, Equity Structured Products. Participants in the Equity Markets-Introduction and Role of the Buy Side, Buy Side Participants, Introduction and Role of Sell Side. Services and Participants in the Sell Side, Market Makers. Types of Equity Markets-Exchanges and Indices in the Equity Markets, Indices and their roles, Understand the difference between exchange and OTC markets, Types of weighted index, other indices and global indices, Electronic and Hybrid Markets and Order and Quote Driven Markets, Global Equity Markets. Trading of Equity Instruments-Equity Investments and its benefits and risks, Stock Quotations, Delivery or cash trading, Long and short positions, Leverage and Margin, Investing, trading and hedging, Placing Orders-limit orders, stop loss orders and GTD/GTC orders, Online and Offline Trading , Introduction to Trade Life Cycle, Clearing and Settlement

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Global Foreign Exchange Markets and Instruments
 

Introduction to Forex Market-What is foreign exchange market, Functions and purposes of the FX market, Introduction to types of Foreign Exchange Market. Participants in the foreign exchange market-Consumers & Travelers, Businesses, Investors & speculators, Commercial & Investment Banks, Government & Central Banks. Theories governing foreign exchange-Interest rate parity, Purchasing power parity, Nominal v/s real exchange rates, etc. Spot Market-Market organization, Quotation conventions, Direct and indirect prices, Cross rates, Value of a pip, Interpreting news and economic statistics, Delivery and operations. Forward Forex Market-Outright forward and swap deals, Relation between spot & forward markets, Quoting forward rates, Quoting swap points, Forward discounts and premiums, Forward forward transactions

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
Global Fixed Income (Bond) Markets and Instruments
 

Overview of Debt Capital Markets-Characteristics of Debt Capital Markets, The differences between equity and debt products, The differences between loans and bonds, Hybrid securities, Securitization. Bond-An Introduction- Bond definition, Bond Issuer & Bond Investor, Types of bond, Bond characteristics, Zero Coupon Bond, Price/yield relationship, Government bond markets, The Eurobond market.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Global Money Markets and Instruments
 

Overview to Money Markets-Objectives, Introduction to Money Markets, Components of Money Markets, Interest rates in the Money Markets, Market Participants in Money Market, Risks involved, Money Markets Instruments-Introduction, Coupon bearing instruments& features, Discount instruments & features. Money Market Operation-Fund Management, CRR Maintenance, Liquidity Management, Money Market Operations, Managing banks' surplus funds, Trading opportunities in Money market, Overnight Call Money Market, Repos and Reverse Repos, CBLOs, Marginal Standing Facilities.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:4
Global Funds
 

Introduction -Potential advantages and disadvantages of collective investment, Difference between active and passive management .Open-Ended/Mutual Funds-Characteristics and different types of open-ended fund / mutual fund: • US • Europe , Purpose and principal features of the Undertakings for Collective Investment in Transferable Securities (UCITS) directive in European markets .Closed-Ended Investment Companies-Characteristics of closed-ended investment companies, share classes, Meaning of the discounts and premiums in relation to the pricing of closed-ended investment companies , How closed-ended investment companies’ shares are traded. Off shore and On-shore Global financial centers

Text Books And Reference Books:

Notes to be provided by the industry partner

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Financial Markets and Institutions 7th Edition By Anthony Saunders and Marcia Cornett, Ninth Edition, McGraw Hill Education

Evaluation Pattern

CIA based evaluation converted to Grade. Grade will contribute to CGPA

BBFT134N - BUSINESS MATHEMATICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims at aiding the students in reaching a level of increased competence in business mathematics and expands understanding of the importance of mathematical concepts in business applications. Emphasis is placed upon learning mathematical concepts by examining some basic business problems.

 

Course objectives

This course will help the learner to gain a familiarity with Mathematical ways to deal with problems related to commerce.

  • Apply matrix algebra, linear programming, differentiation and their applications in business and economics.

•             To understand the concept of matrices and determinants, types of interests, annuities, limits and differentiation

•             To apply the concepts of matrices, differentiation in commerce and economics

•             To apply the concepts of Linear Programming Problem for a given scenario to optimize the solution

•             To analyse the given transportation and assignment problem and evaluate the optimum transportation cost

•             To evaluate the maximum and minimum value of a given function

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand the theory of matrices and solve problems based on matrices and determinants

CO2: Interpret concepts of Matrices and Determinants and apply in the applications of business

CO3: Solve problems on simple interest, compound interest, annuities, sinking funds, etc.,

CO4: Formulate a linear programming problem and solve it graphically and using simplex method.

CO5: Solve problems based on transportation and assignment problems using different methods

CO6: Inspect concepts of limits and differentiation of various functions and second order differentiation.

CO7: Interpret concepts of limits and differentiation and apply them to solve problems in business

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:13
Matrices and Determinants
 

Level of Knowledge: Basic, Conceptual and Analytical

Matrices and Determinants  - addition of matrices – Multiplication of Matrices by a scalar – some special types of matrices – Multiplication of two matrices – Properties of Matrix Multiplication – determinants – Minors and co-factors – properties of determinants (statement only ) – product of two determinants – inverse of Matrix (Simple Problems only). Applications of Matrices and Determinants – Matrix representation of data – Addition of matrices – Scalar multiple of a matrix – Applications – Multiplications of matrices – Applications – System of linear equations – Matrix inverse method – Cramer’s Rule – Leontief’s input and output model.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Commercial Arithmetic
 

Level of Knowledge: Conceptual and Analytical
Simple interest – Compound interest – Equivalent rate – Depreciation – Present value – Annuity –
Sinking Fund.

 

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Linear Programming
 

Level of Knowledge: Basic, Conceptual and Analytical
Definition – Linear Programming Problem – Formulation – Solution by Graphical method – simplex method – minimization and maximization problems.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Transportation Problem
 

Level of Knowledge: Basic, Conceptual and Analytical

Nature and scope of transportation and allocation models, different methods for finding initial solution - N-W Corner Rule, Least Cost Method and VAM.  Unbalanced TP, Test for optimality – MODI method, AP a variant of Transportation model, Hungarian method, Restricted Assignment problems.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:15
Differentiation
 

Level of Knowledge: Basic, Conceptual and Analytical

Limits – Differentiation – Methods of differentiation – Second order derivative – Maxima and Minima – Application to commerce and Economics – Revenue Function – Cost function – profit function – Elasticity of demand – Breakeven point

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.       E. Don and J. J. Lerner, Schaum’s outlines of Basic Business Mathematics, 2nd ed., McGraw-Hill, 2010.

2.       J D Gupta, P K Gupta and M. Mohan, Mathematics for Business and Economics, Tata Mc Graw Hill Publishing Company Limited, 1987.

3.       A.H. Mouhammed, Quantitative methods for Business and Economics, 3rd ed., Routledge, 2015.

4.     D. R. Anderson, D. J. Sweeney, T. A. Williams, J. D. Camm, J. J. Cochran, M. J. Fry and J. W. Ohlmann, Quantitative Methods for Business, 12th ed., South-Western Cengage Learning, 2013.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.       D.C. Sancheti and V.K.Kapoor, Business Mathematics, 11th ed., Sultan Chand andSons, 2012.

2.       U.K. Srivatsava, G.V.Shenoy and S.C.Sharma, Quantitative Techniques for Managerial Decisions, 3rd ed., New Age International Publishers, 2012.

Evaluation Pattern

Component of Final Grade

Max Marks per Component

Weightage towards Final Grade

Total Marks per Component in Final Grade

CIA-I

20

20 %

20

CIA-II

50

25 %

25

CIA-III

20

20%

20

End Semester

50

30 %

30

Attendance

5

5 %

5

Total

 

100

100

BBFT135N - INTRODUCTION TO FINTECH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The objective of the course is to introduce the students to the FinTech sector and to understand how emerging technology is casing disruptions and innovations in finance sector. This course as a part of specialized business administration programme provides cutting edge fundamental knowledge in the frontiers of financial technology required for a budding professional in the banking & financial services industry.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: To trace the evolutionary journey of financial technology

CO2: To explain the impact of financial technology on financial services

CO3: To provide an understanding of the technical intricacies of financial technology

CO4: To take stock of the technological trends sweeping the financial services sector

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Introduction to FinTech
 

What is FinTech Industry? Evolution of FinTech, FinTech Evolution 1.0: Infrastructure,  FinTech Evolution 2.0: Banking industry, FinTech Evolution 3.0 & 3.5: Startups and Emerging Markets, Importance of FinTech, Global FinTech Investment, Main FinTech Hubs.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
FinTech Reshaping Financial Services Industry-I
 

FinTech in Payment Industry-Multichannel digital wallets, applications supporting wallets, onboarding and KYC application, FinTech in Lending Industry- Formal lending, Informal lending, P2P lending, POS lending, Online lending, Payday lending, Microfinance, Crowdfunding, 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
FinTech as disruptor empowering Financial Services Industry-II
 

FinTech in Wealth Management Industry-Financial Advice, Automated investing, Socially responsible investing, Fractional Investing, Social Investing. FinTech in Insurance Industry- P2P insurance, On-Demand Insurance, On-Demand Consultation, Customer engagement through Quote to sell, policy servicing, Claims Management, Investment linked health insurance.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Technology Disruptions enabling FinTech Innovations
 

4G and 5G networks fuelling FinTech Opportunities, transforming customer experience using Mobile Applications and smart phones, embedded sensors and social media, Cloud computing, Web 2.0, Rapid Web Design, JavaScript Technologies, IoT, Big Data, analytics and AI and Blockchain.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
The state of FinTech globally
 

US-The revolution starter, Europe and UK-The fintech hub, Germany, Sweden, France, China-The FinTech dragon awakens, India-The tiger is roaring, Africa-A young FinTech continent, Australia, New Zealand and Brazil-the emerging FinTech countries, Regulatory and Policy Assessment for Growth of Fintech.Fin Tech as disruptors, Financial institutions collaborating with FinTech companies, The new financial world.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Case Studies in FinTech
 

PayTm, Aadhar, Credit Karma,eTORO , Robinhood, Policy Bazaar

Text Books And Reference Books:

Arner D., Barbers J., Buckley R (2015) The evolution of FinTech: a new post crisis paradigm, University of New South Wales Research Series.

Susanne Chishti, Janos Barberis (2016). The FINTECH Book: The Financial Technology Handbook for Investors, Entrepreneurs and Visionaries (Wile01) Paperback, Wiley Publications 

Richard Hayen (2016). FinTech: The Impact and Influence of Financial Technology on Banking and the Finance Industry

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Parag Y Arjunwadkar (2018), FinTech: The Technology Driving Disruption in the financial service industry CRC Press.

Sanjay Phadke (2020), Fintech Future : The Digital DNA of Finance Paperback .Sage Publications

Pranay Gupta, T. Mandy Tham (2018). Fintech: The New DNA of Financial Services Paperback 

RBI(2017). Report of working group on FinTech and Digital Banking

Evaluation Pattern

Component of Final Grade

Max Marks per Component

Weightage towards Final Grade

Total Marks per Component in Final Grade

CIA-I

20

20 %

20

CIA-II

50

25 %

25

CIA-III

20

20%

20

End Semester

50

30 %

30

Attendance

5

5 %

5

Total

 

100

100

BECO191AN - INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The primary aim of this course is to introduce students to the concept of institutions and the informal economy in a global context. The discourse examines the informal economy through the lens of institutional economics. The aim is to acquaint students to significant discourses and issues in policy design and intervention.

Course Objectives

This course will:

  • introduce students to the institutions and institutional change through major concepts in institutional economics;
  • discuss the informal economy through concepts, theory, and measurement;
  • examine the linkages of formal and informal economy;
  • train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss these complex ideas.

Learning Outcome

CO1: · Introduce students to the environment, industry and economy linkage; and Discuss the economics of resource use;

CO2: Examine the economics of Environmental Quality; and Discuss the vision towards green industrialization

CO3: To understand the key challenges towards acceleration of greening SMEs and To understand the interlinkages between green industry, trade and global supply chain

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Institutions and Institutional Change
 

Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic Performance; Informal Constraints; Formal Constraints; The Path of Institutional Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Elements of Institutional Economics
 

Contracts and Property Rights: the Concepts of Exchange and Property, Critique of the Utilitarian Calculus; Transaction Costs, Bargaining Power; Markets as Institutions; Firms and Markets

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Informality: Concepts, Theory and Measurement
 

Bureaucratic Form and the Informal Economy; Formal and Informal Enterprises: Concepts, Definition, and Measurement Issues; Linking the Formal and Informal Economy.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:13
Empirical Studies in Institutional Change and Informality
 

CASE STUDIES: The Impact of Regulation on Growth and Informality: Cross-Country Evidence; Blocking Human Potential: How Formal Policies Block the Economy in the Maputo Corridor; Enforcement and Compliance in Lima’s Street Markets: The Origins and Consequences of Policy Incoherence towards Informal Traders

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Alston, L. J., Eggertsson, T., & North, D. C. (Eds.). (1996). Empirical Studies in Institutional Change. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  2. Guha-Khasnobis, B., Kanbur, R., &Ostrom, E. (Eds.). (2006). Linking the Formal and Informal Economy: Concepts and Policies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  3. Misztal, B. (2002). Informality: Social theory and Contemporary Practice. Routledge.
  4. North, D. (1990). Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic Performance . Institutions, Institutional Change and Economic performance. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Arias, O., Fajnzylber, P., Maloney, W., Mason, A., Perry, G., & Saavedra-Chanduvi, J. (2007). Informality: Exit and Exclusion. Washington: The World Bank.
  2. Harriss, J. (2006). Power Matters: Essays on Institutions, Politics, and Society in India. New York: Oxford University Press.
  3. Mehta, P. B., &Kapur, D. (2005). Public Institutions in India: Performance and Design. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  4. Nayyar, D. (Ed.). (2002). Governing Globalization: Issues and Institutions. Oxford University Press.
  5. Oviedo, A. M. (2009). Economic Informality: Causes, Costs, and Policies: A Literature Survey of International Experience. Country Economic Memorandum (CEM).
Evaluation Pattern

 

Mid Semester Examination: Group/Individual Assignment (45 Marks)

End Semester Examination: Group/Individual Assignment (50 Marks)

Class Attendance/Participation (5 Marks)

BECO191BN - ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:95
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates in the economics of corruption. The course discusses how corruption acts as a constraint on economic growth using the theoretical constructs in Political Economy. It allows students to delve into the causes and consequences of corruption. In particular, the course will examine how corruption affects the emerging economies.

Course Objectives

This course will: consider some of the seminal papers on the economics of corruption acquaint students to significant debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption analyse corruption in emerging economies through various case studies discuss issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing corruption as erosion of trust and abuse of power train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss complex ideas.

Learning Outcome

CO1: ? consider some of the seminal papers on the economics of corruption ? acquaint students to significant debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption

CO2: ? analyse corruption in emerging economies through various case studies ? discuss issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing corruption as erosion of trust and abuse of power

CO3: ? train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss complex ideas.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption, Poor Governance and Institutional Structure
 

Causes and Consequences of Corruption: What do we know from a cross-section of countries?, Democratic Institutions and Corruption: Incentives and Constraints in Politics, Bargaining for Bribes: the Role of Institutions

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption and the Private Sector
 

The Privatization of Rent-Generating Industries and Corruption; Corruption in Private Sector, Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Tackling Corruption
 

Corruption and Policy Reform; Anti-Corruption Authorities: An Effective Tool to Curb Corruption? Corruption and Competition: Fair Markets as an Anticorruption Device

Text Books And Reference Books:

·         Auriol, E., & Straub, S. (2011). Privatization of Rent-generating Industries and Corruption. In S. Rose-Ackerman & T. Søreide, (Eds.). International Handbook on the Economics of Corruption, (Vol. 2). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Pub.

·         Burger, E. S., & Holland, M. S. (2006). Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption. Fordham International Law Journal, 30, 45.

·         Cartier-Bresson, J. (2000). Economics of corruption. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. The OECD Observer, (220), 25.

·         Jain, A. K. (2001). Corruption: A Review. Journal of Economic Surveys, 15(1), 71-121.

·         Jain, A. K. (Ed.). (2012). Economics of Corruption (Vol. 65). Springer Science & Business Media.

·         Meschi, P. X. (2009). Government Corruption and Foreign Stakes in International Joint Ventures in Emerging Economies. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 26(2), 241-261.

·         Meyer, K. E., Estrin, S., Bhaumik, S. K., & Peng, M. W. (2009). Institutions, Resources, and Entry Strategies in Emerging Economies. Strategic Management Journal, 30(1), 61-80.

·         Nowakowski, K. (2010). Corruption in Private Sector.Economics and Law, 6(1), 345-360.

·         

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Rose-Ackerman, S. (1975). The Economics of Corruption. Journal of Public Economics, 4(2), 187- 203.

·         Uhlenbruck, K., Rodriguez, P., Doh, J., & Eden, L. (2006). The Impact of Corruption on Entry Strategy: Evidence from Telecommunication Projects in Emerging Economies. Organization Science, 17(3), 402-414.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern Course title

MSE (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

The Economics of Corruption

45%

50%

BPSY191AN - SCIENCE OF WELLNESS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course heralds the emergence of a new field of science that endeavours to understand how individuals and societies thrive and

flourish, and how this new knowledge can be applied to foster happiness, health and fulfillment. Taking a dynamic, cross-disciplinary approach, the

course explores the most promising routes to well-being, derived from the latest research in psychology, neuroscience, economics, and the effects of

our natural environment. The course provides an overview of the latest insights and strategies for enhancing our individual well-being, or the well-being of the communities in

which we live and work.

Course Objectives:

1. Understand the evolution and development of health and well-being

2. Develop a holistic approach to living life well.

3. Create optimal programs for individuals and populations.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to analyze various perspectives from the latest research in psychology, neuroscience, economics, and the effects of our natural environment on well being

CO2: Integration of various aspects to have a holistic perspective on wellbeing

CO3: Ability to design interventions to enhance positive mental health in individuals and populations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Well-Being
 

Well being as a concept, happiness and subjective well-being, Expanding the repertoire of positive emotions: The broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions; Relationship with reality and its role in the well-being of young adults; Increasing happiness in life, Positive mental health in individuals and populations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Well-being across life-span
 

Living well at every stage of life: Resilience in childhood, positive youth development, life tasks of adulthood and successful aging; Role of meaningful relationships:infant attachment, adult attachment, love and flourishing relationships; Seeing the future through self efficacy and optimism; Role of Self efficacy in life arenas, learned optimism.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Socio-cultural and Economic Considerations
 

The relevance of subjective well-being to social policies: optimal experience and tailored intervention; The social context of well-being; Does money buy happiness?; A well-being manifesto for a flourishing society.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Coan, R. W. (1977). Hero, artist, sage, or saint? A survey of what is variously called mental health, normality, maturity, self-actualization, and human fulfillment. New York: Columbia University Press.
  • Boniwell, I. (2012). Positive Psychology In a Nutshell: The Science of Happiness (3rdedition). London: Mc Graw Hill.
  • Bradburn, N. M. (1969). The structure of psychological well-being. Chicago, IL:Aldine.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Felicia A. Huppert, Nick Baylis, and Barry Keverne (2005). The Science of Well- Being. Oxford University Press.
  • Synder,C.R., & Lopez, S.J. (2007). Positive Psychology. New Delhi: Sage Publishing House.
Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA Evaluation pattern

 

Individual

Assignment

lab work and report

writing

Group Assignment/

field work 

Exhibition/ case study / activity

 

Test/quiz

Attendance

Total

 

20

20

20

15

20

5

100

BPSY191BN - ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Advertisement psychology is a branch of psychology which studies the pattern of responses by the human system to advertisement stimuli. Advertising is the art of influencing human behaviors to buy certain products. Recently  advertisers are discovering the need to know the facts which psychology can give about what attracts attention, what sticks in memory, what gives a pleasant impression, what persuades and what leads to the act of purchase. The field helps marketers and copyrighters to prepare effective advertisements.

 

Course Objectives

At the end of the course, students will be able to: 

1.      Understand the historical and scientific origin and development of the field.

2.      Learn the cognitive, affective and behavioural responses to the advertisement stimuli.

       3.      Develop the skills to evaluate effectiveness of advertisements from psychological perspectives.

Learning Outcome

1: Apply the psychological perspectives of advertisements in the real-life setting.

2: Integrate different domains such as cognitive, affective and behavioral responses in the field of advertisement.

3: Develop the ability to make applications based on understanding of marketing strategies.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Introduction to advertisement psychology
 

Introduction to advertisements; its objectives and importance;

Types and forms of advertising;

Effects of advertisements - a psychological perspective;

Classic and contemporary approaches of classifying advertisement effectiveness.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Cognitive processing of advertisements
 

Influence of advertisements on buying behaviors;

Dynamics of Attention, Comprehension, Reasoning for advertisements;

Attitudes and attitude changes with the influence of advertisements;

Principles of persuasion and attitude change;

Achieving advertisement compliance without changing attitude.   

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: International Advertising and Creating Brand
 

Emergence of International Advertising;

Advertising in Multicultural Environment;

Ethics in Advertising;

Integrated marketing communication and marketing mix.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Linda, F. Alwitt& Andrew, A. Mitchell. (1985).Psychological Processes and Advertising

Effects: Theory, Research, and Applications. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Hillsdale, NJ. London.

Rolloph, M.E. & Miller, G.R. (Eds) (1980).Persuasion: New Directions in Theory and

Research.Sage. N.Y.

Eddie. M. Clark, Timothy.C. Brock,& David W. Stewart. (1994).Attention, Attitude and

Affect in Response to Advertising. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Hillsdale, NJ.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Fennis, B. M., & Stroebe, W. (2015). The Psychology of Advertising. New York: Psychology    

Press.

Andrew,A. Mitchell. (1993).Advertising Exposure, Memory and Choice.Lawrence Erlbaum

Associates. Hillsdale, NJ.

Evaluation Pattern

Reflective Assignment

Presentation

Module Development

Attendance

Total

30

30

35

5

100

ENG121N - ENGLISH - I (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

ENGlogue is an English language course book for the students of first year of undergraduate courses studying in Christ University. The book that covers both Semesters I and II is built around fourteen contemporary themes, with each unit including two interesting and engaging reading texts. The texts are meant to trigger not just the desired language-learning behaviors but also to engage the students in thinking about various pertinent issues concerning the world around them. Each unit also includes teaching and tasks based on vocabulary, reading, writing and speaking. The overall objective of the book is to provide students with hands-on learning of language skills, equipping them not only for their immediate academic needs but also for their future professional careers.

  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  •  To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information
  • To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes
  • To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning
  • To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning
  • To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expression.
  •  To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities and politics

CO2: Understand and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

CO3: Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class.

CO4: Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Beauty
 
  1. The Happy Prince By Oscar Wilde
  2. Sonnet 18 by Shakespeare
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Travel
 
  1. Why We Travel- Pico Iyer
  2. What Solo Travel Has Taught Me About the World and Myself - ShivyaNath
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Environment
 
  1. Thinking Like a Mountain- Aldo Leopold
  2. On Cutting a Tree-  Gieve Patel

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Note taking

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Paragraph writing

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Religion
 
  1. Violence in the name of God is Violence against God - Rev Dr Tveit
  2. Leave this Chanting and Singing and Telling of Beads- Rabindra Nath Tagore

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Crime
 
  1. The Story of B24 by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  2.  Aarushi Murder case
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Health and Fitness
 
  1. My Story- Nicole DeFreece
  2. Why You Should Never Aim for Six Packs- Kinnari Jariwala
Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Sports
 
  1. Sir Ranjth Singh- Sourav Ganguly
  2. Casey at the Bat- Ernest Lawrence Thayer

 

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
Visual Text
 

Before the Flood

Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Additional material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20

CIA 2=50

CIA 3= 20

ESE= 50 marks online and 50 marks written exam

ENG191AN - INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course ‘Introduction to Film Studies’ aims at introducing students to the cinema, important trends and genres in world cinema, along with key concepts in film studies. It aims to make participants familiar with some major international cinematic figures and films. It aids in the basic understanding of the field, its vast history, and its role in society. Students receive the chance to enhance the skills required to study Films with reference to art and society. It develops the students’ critical thinking ability that is required for analyzing, criticizing,  and creating quality films.

Course Objectives:

  • Introduces to the theories, methods, and concerns of film and media studies as a discipline, preparing the students for further work in the field. 

  • Teaches the specific aspects of film style and narrative form through analysis of scenes from the films screened each week and from a range of outside examples. 

  • Equips the students with historical, cultural, and theoretical topics relevant to the films. 

  • Teaches the language of cinema.

  • Trains the students to critically analyze the content.

  • Learns to communicate effectively.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the relationship between film form and aesthetic effect through both film analysis and the creation of motion pictures.

CO2: Employ the theories, methods and the language of cinema and relate to culture, history, and aesthetics.

CO3: Conduct film research and compose cogent, persuasive, and valid essays about film.

CO4: Investigate, identify and utilize major methods of film analysis.

CO5: Critically analyse, appreciate, and interpret significant works of art.

CO6: Develop strong communication skills.

CO7: Understand the making of cinema and lays the foundation for the making of a film.

CO8: Create quality content and acquire skills of Film making.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 
  • What is an Art?

  • Art as an Entertainment

  • Evolution of cinema

  •  Impact of theatre and Folk arts

  •  Industrial technological, aesthetic, and  cultural development in cinema

  •  Establishment of the Film industry and audience

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Language of Cinema
 
  • What is cinema? Why do we watch films?

  • Language of Film- cut, focus, frame, fade, close-up

  • Genres

  • Images, symbols, colours, narration, gestures, and expression

  • Role of individuals in shaping a cinema

  • Film Production

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Film Criticism
 
  • Difference between film analysis and criticism

  • From play to picture- a transformation of expressions into motions

  • Good cinema and bad cinema-criteria of assessment

  • Believe the unbelievable- cinemas that brought the audience to believe nonexistent elements

  • Books, stories, and the songs-the backbone of a successful screenplay

  • Content-the hero of a movie

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Evolution of New Forms
 
  • Motion picture

  • Feature film

  • Short film

  • Art movie

  • Documentary

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Cinematography
 
  • Innovation in cinematography

  • Sound and Lights- the lifeline of a movie

  • VFX, CG, and SFX

  • Cinematic techniques

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Andre Bazin: The Evolution of the Language of Cinema C.S. Venkitsweran, Swayamvaram: Classic Prophecies in Film and Philosophy ed. K Gopinathan

  2.  Satyajit Ray: What is Wrong with Indian Films 

  3. Susan Hayward: Cinema Studies: The Key Concepts

  4.  Ronald Abramson “ Structure and Meaning in Cinema in Movies and Methods Ed. Bill Nichols 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Film Art: An Introduction by David Bordwell & Kristin Thomson 

  2. How to Read a Film by James Monaco

  3. Understanding Movies by Louis Giannetti 

  4. Filmmaker’s Handbook by Steven Ascher & Edward Pincus 

  5. Grammar of the Shot by Roy Thompson & Christopher J. Bowen

  6.  Grammar of the Editing by Roy Thompson & Christopher J. Bowen 

  7. History of Narrative Film by David A. Cook

Evaluation Pattern

 

S.No

Assessment (Nature of CIAs)

Weightage 

1

CIA 1: Presentation

30

2

CIA 2: Analysis of Content/ Film Criticism

30

3

CIA 3: Content Writing/ Content Creation

30

4

Class Participation

05

5

Attendance 

05

 

Total

100

ENG191BN - DIGITAL HUMANITIES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description:

 

This course is designed to introduce the young students to the emerging field of Digital Humanities and its wide array of scope, research and academic engagements in the field of Arts and Humanities through incorporation of examples and case studies. Digitalisation is a product of the modern mechanised society; it has come to be accepted as an indispensable part of our lives today. Its use in the field of Humanities is a very recent development, with major contributions to documentation, preservation and ushering in a multidimensional interdisciplinary approach to our study, for sources ranging from audio-visual nature to textual work.

 

Course Objectives:

 

  1.  The students will be acquainted to many existing arguments in the area of Digital Humanities in the last few decades while examining the aid of digital tools in literary and cultural studies.
  2. The students will learn to create a sample of their own by replicating any existing digital artifact.
  3. The students will be able to identify Digital Humanities as an interdisciplinary field of study through case studies and comparative analysis.

 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Learn to document, preserve and catalogue any content

CO2: Understand digital as a cite of knowledge production and preservation

CO3: Treat audio-visual sources as necessary tools for research study

CO4: Efficient use of machine/digital in day-to-day life

CO5: Acknowledge Digital Humanities as a field of immense potential for generating information

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction: Digital Humanities
 

1.1 Digital Humanities: From inception to the present

1.2 Theorists and Major Thinkers

1.3 Digital Tools in Humanities and Audio-Visual Culture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Archiving in Digital Humanities
 

2.1 Preservation: Art and Culture

2.2 Preservation: Literature and Language

2.3 Preservation: Documentation as Knowledge Production

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Digital Humanities: Case Studies
 

3.1 Textual Adaptation: From Manuscripts to Visual Text

3.2 Transcreation: Folk to Popular Culture

3.3 Machine Learning: Machine Translation, Subtitling, SEO, Text-o-Speech

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dan Cohen and Roy Rosenzweig (2005). Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web. University of Pennsylvania Press.

James Gleick (2011). The Information: A History, A Theory, A Flood. Pantheon.

Matthew Gold (2013). Debates in the Digital Humanities. University of Minnesota Press.

Ramsay, Stephen (2011). Reading Machines: Toward an Algorithmic Criticism. University of Illinois Press.

Susan Schreibman, Ray Siemens, and John Unsworth (eds.) (2004). A Companion to Digital Humanities. Oxford.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cohen, Daniel J., et al. “Interchange: The Promise of Digital History.” The Journal of American History, vol. 95, no. 2, 2008, pp. 452–491. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/25095630. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021.

EARHART, AMY E. “Can We Trust the University?: Digital Humanities Collaborations with Historically Exploited Cultural Communities.” Bodies of Information: Intersectional Feminism and the Digital Humanities, edited by Elizabeth Losh and Jacqueline Wernimont, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2018, pp. 369–390. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctv9hj9r9.23. Accessed 8 Aug. 2021.

Huggett, Jeremy. “Core or Periphery? Digital Humanities from an Archaeological Perspective.” Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, vol. 37, no. 3 (141), 2012, pp. 86–105. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/41636599. Accessed 9 Aug. 2021.

KIRSCHENBAUM, MATTHEW. “What Is Digital Humanities and What’s It Doing in English Departments?” Debates in the Digital Humanities, edited by Matthew K. Gold, NED - New edition ed., University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2012, pp. 3–11. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttv8hq.4. Accessed 11 Aug. 2021.

Lindquist, Thea, et al. “Advancing Digital Humanities at CU-Boulder through Evidence-Based Service Design.” Laying the Foundation: Digital Humanities in Academic Libraries, edited by John W. White and Heather Gilbert, vol. 7, Purdue University Press, West Lafayette, Indiana, 2016, pp. 127–148. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt163t7kq.11. Accessed 9 Aug. 2021.

LOSH, ELIZABETH, et al. “Putting the Human Back into the Digital Humanities: Feminism, Generosity, and Mess.” Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016, edited by Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2016, pp. 92–103. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctt1cn6thb.13. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021.

McPherson, Tara. “Introduction: Media Studies and the Digital Humanities.” Cinema Journal, vol. 48, no. 2, 2009, pp. 119–123. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/20484452. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021.

ROBERTSON, STEPHEN. “The Differences between Digital Humanities and Digital History.” Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016, edited by Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2016, pp. 289–307. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctt1cn6thb.28. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021.

RUBERG, BONNIE, et al. “Toward a Queer Digital Humanities.” Bodies of Information: Intersectional Feminism and the Digital Humanities, edited by Elizabeth Losh and Jacqueline Wernimont, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2018, pp. 108–128. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctv9hj9r9.11. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021.

Sharpe, Celeste Tu´ò´ng Vy, and Timothy B. Powell. “Making Digital Humanities Tools More Culturally Specific and More Culturally Sensitive.” Teaching with Digital Humanities: Tools and Methods for Nineteenth-Century American Literature, edited by Jennifer Travis and Jessica DeSpain, University of Illinois Press, Urbana, Chicago; Springfield, 2018, pp. 167–184. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctv8bt13m.16. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021.

Tolbert, Jeffrey A., and Eric D. M. Johnson. “Digital Folkloristics: Text, Ethnography, and Interdisciplinarity.” Western Folklore, vol. 78, no. 4, 2019, pp. 327–356. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/26864167. Accessed 8 Aug. 2021.

Viscomi, Joseph. “Digital Facsimiles: Reading the William Blake Archive.” Computers and the Humanities, vol. 36, no. 1, 2002, pp. 27–48. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/30204695. Accessed 8 Aug. 2021.

WARD, MEGAN, and ADRIAN S. WISNICKI. “The Archive after Theory.” Debates in the Digital Humanities 2019, edited by Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2019, pp. 200–206. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctvg251hk.21. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I- Blog Writing       

CIA II- Book History: Archival Report        

CIA III- Project

HIN122N - HINDI (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The detailed text book 'Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha” is a collection of Modern Hindi poems of leading writers of Hindi Poetry edited by Dr.N Mohanan.From the medieval poetry ' Kabir Ke Dohe and Sur ke pad 'is also included.By teaching business correspondence emphasis is being given to functional Hindi too. Hindusthani Music and TranslationPractice also have been included in this semester.

Course Objectives:

  • to impart the knowledge of poetics
  • to acquire translation skills
  • to expose students to veriety of texts to interact with them
  • to help students develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organisation of language
  • to help students understand the relationship between the world around them and the text
  • to improve their oral and written skills
  • to expose them to the world of music

Learning Outcome

CO1: Students will be exposed to the world of poetry and Music.

CO2: Through translation, students can understand different languages, literature, and cultures.

CO3: Business correspondence helps the students to understand the functional aspects of the language.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:25
Kavya Sankalan - Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha. (An anthology of contemporary Hindi poems), Kabir ke Dohe and Sur Ke Pad
 

‘Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha’ (Collection of Poems) Ed by Dr N Mohanan, Rajpal and son's, New Delhi

Level of knowledge: Analytical

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:5
Translation- practice
 


                  

Translation-Practice English to Hindi and vise- versa

Level of knowledge:Basic                                           

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:5
Patra Lekhan --Vyavasaik Patra Vyavhar (Business letters)
 

Vyavasaik Patra Vyavhar (Business letters)                                

  1. Mulya Suchi 
  2. Adesh
  3. Shikayathi
  4. Bhugtan

Level of knowledge: Conceptual

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Hindusthani Sangeeth-parampara evam pramukh kalakar
 

Utbhav,Vikas aur paramparaein

Pramukh Sangeethkar-1.Bhimsen Joshi 2.Gulam Ali 3.Pandit Ravishankar 4. Bismillah Khan.

Text Books And Reference Books:

  1. Kavya Sankalan - ‘Samakaleen Hindi Kavitha’ (Collection of Poems)Ed. by Dr. N Mohanan.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Abhinav Patra-Vyavahar -Dr.Paramanand Gupta

2. Vanijya Hindi By A.R.Narti1.A Hand Book of Translation Studies By Das Bijay Kumar

3. Anuvad Evam Sanchar – Dr Pooranchand Tantan, Rajpal and Son’s, Kashmiri Gate, New Delhi – 110006

4. Anuvad Vignan By Bholanath Tiwari

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1 – will be paperless Presentation –Assignment (1)-10 %

CIA 2 – Mid-semester Examination-25%

CIA 3 – will be written Assignment- Assignment (2)-10%

Attendance – 5%

CIA‘s and Attendance will have 50% weight

 

The end semester examination will have 50% weight.

 

The final grade will be total of ESE and CIAs .Total marks will be 100.

AEN221N - ADDITIONAL ENGLISH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The second semester has a variety of writing from India, Pakistan and Srilanka. The various essays, short stories and poems deal with various socio-economic, cultural and political issues that are relevant to modern day India and the Indian sub-continent and will enable students to comprehend issues of identity-politics, caste, religion, class, and gender. All of the selections either in the manner of their writing, the themes they deal with or the ideologies that govern them are contemporary in relevance and sensibility, whether written by contemporary writers or earlier writers. Excerpts from interviews, autobiographical writings, sports and city narratives are added to this section to introduce students to the varied genres of literature.

The objectives of this course are to expose students to the rich literary and cultural diversity of Indian literatures to sensitise students on the social, political, historical and cultural ethos that has shaped the nation- INDIA to enable to grasp and appreciate the variety and abundance of Indian writing, of which this compilation is just a passing glance to learn and appreciate India through association of ideas in the texts and the external contexts (BhashaUtsav will be an intrinsic help in this endeavour).

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Aware culturally, ethically, socially and politically as citizens.

CO2: Sensitize students towards cultural, social, religious and ethnic diversities and help them engage with their peers and all around them in a more understanding and ?educated? manner.

CO3: It will also enable them through the activities conducted to become more proactive citizens/participants in society, aware of the dynamics of gender, identity, communalism and politics of this vast nation through its literature.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Poetry
 

1. Jayanta Mahapatra “Grandfather”

2. Meena Alexander “Rites of Sense”

3. K.Satchidanandan “Cactus”

4. Jean Arasanayagam “Nallur”

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Short Stories
 

1. Temsula Ao “The Journey”

2. A. K Ramanujan “Annaya’s Anthropology

3. Sundara Ramswamy “Waves”

4. Ashfaq Ahmed “Mohsin Mohalla”

5. T.S Pillai “In the Floods"

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:20
Essays
 

1. Salman Rushdie “Gandhi Now”

2. Amartya Sen “Sharing the World”

3. Suketu Mehta “Country of the No”

4. Rahul Bhattacharya “Pundits From Pakistan” (An Excerpt)

Text Books And Reference Books:

The textbook "Reading Diversity"

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Online references for Comprehension Questions in the textbook

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: Classroom assignment/test for 20 marks keeping in tune with the course objectives and learning outcomes.

CIA 2: Mid-semester written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Collage, tableaus, skits, talk shows, documentaries, Quizzes or any proactive creative assignments that might help students engage with India as a cultural space. This is to be done keeping in tune with the course objectives and learning outcomes.

Question Paper Pattern

Mid Semester Exam: 2 Hrs

Section A: 4x5= 20

Section B: 2x15=30

Total 50

End Semester Exam: 2 hrs

Section A: 5 x 5 = 25

Section B: 5 x 15= 75

Total 100

BBA231 - ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course focuses on the basic elements that determine human behavior in an organizational context. It provides various theoretical frameworks to understand human behaviours at individual, group and organization level. The course provides insights into the foundation of human behaviours such as personality, learning, values, attitudes and perception. At the group level its characteristics in terms of size, status, norms, role and cohesiveness makes it functional or dysfunctional. Leaders who are able to influence the individual and group behaviours create positive organisations culture. Thus it is essential for manager to develop an understanding about human behaviours at the workplace and manage them for organizational effectiveness. 

Course Objectives:

To examine the impact of globalization, diversity and ethics on organizational behaviours.

  1. To analyses the individual’s work behaviours due to personality, attitudes and perceptions. 

  2. To assess the dynamics of group behaviours and its influence on group effectiveness. 

  3. To compare and contrast various leadership style as in classic and modern theories.

  4. To determine practices that creates positive organisation culture.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To analyses the individual?s work behaviours due to personality, attitudes and perceptions.

CO2: To assess the dynamics of group behaviours and its influence on group effectiveness.

CO3: To compare and contrast various leadership style as in classic and modern theories.

CO4: To determine practices that creates positive organisation culture.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Organizational Behavior
 

Definition of Organizational Behavior, OB as systematic study, Contribution from other disciplines, Challenges and Opportunities in organizational behavior, OB Model/Framework- Individual, Group and Organisational Level.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Personality, Learning & Values
 

Defining and Measuring Personality, Determinants of Personality, The Big Five Personality Model, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and Other Personality Traits like Authoritarianism, Locus of Control, Machiavellianism, Self Esteem, Risk Taking, Self-Monitoring and Achievement Oriented. Importance of values- instrumental and terminal values. 

 

Meaning of Learning; Theories of Learning- Classical Conditioning, Operant conditioning, Cognitive theory, Social learning theory, Principles of learning, Schedule of Reinforcement. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Attitude
 

Components of Attitude- ABC model, Function of Attitude, Cognitive Dissonance Changing Attitude, Work Attitudes- Job Satisfaction and Organisation Commitment. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Perception
 

Meaning, Factors influencing perception, Attribution Theory, Common short cuts in judging others.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Group Dynamics
 

Define Group and different type of Groups, Stages of Group Development, Group Properties-Roles, Norms, Status, Size, Cohesiveness; Group Decision making, Groupthink and Group Shift

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Leadership
 

Concept of Leadership-Trait Theories-Behavioral Theories, Ohio & Michigan Studies - Managerial Grid; Contingency Theory-Situational Leadership and Path & Goal of leadership; Contemporary Theories- Transformational, Transactional, Charismatic Leadership, Ethical Leadership and Servant Leadership. 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:10
Organization Culture
 

Definition of organizational culture and its characteristics, Strong versus Weak culture, Function and Dysfunction of Culture, Creating & Sustaining Culture, -How employees learn culture-Creating Positive organizational culture. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stephen P. Robbins, Timothy A. Judge and Neharika Vohra (2018), 18th Ed. Organizational Behaviour. Pearson Education Asia.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Aswathappa, K. (2016). Organizational Behaviour (Text, Cases and Games), 12th Ed. Bangalore: Himalaya Publication. 
  • Fred Luthans (2017). Organizational Behavior: An Evidence - Based Approach, 12th Ed. McGraw Hill Education.
  • Gupta, C. B. (2014). A textbook of organisational behaviour: With text and cases. New Delhi: S Chand & Company.
Evaluation Pattern

 

 

Component of Final Grade

Max Marks per Component

Weightage towards Final Grade

Total Marks per Component in Final Grade

CIA-I 

20

20 %

20

CIA-II

50

25 %

25

CIA-III 

20

20%

20

End – Term

50

30 %

30

Attendance

5

5 %

5

Total

   

100

BBA232 - BUSINESS STATISTICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description:

Business Statistics helps us to make business decisions under uncertainties based on numerical and measurable scales. Decision making process should be always objective and in order to make unbiased decisions, collection and analysis of quantitative data as well as interpreting the results necessitates an understanding of statistical tools and models. As a result, it is essential for individuals working in this environment to have the knowledge and skills to interpret and use appropriate statistical tools and statistical techniques in various scenarios.

Course Objectives:

       To demonstrate the knowledge of organising a problem/data and make evidence-based decisions using statistical tools.

  • To extend an understanding of application of relevant statistical concepts to a given context/business scenario.
  •  To solve real business problems by analysing data with appropriate statistical techniques.
  • To analyse the data using correlation and other statistical tools
  • To interpret regression/time series equations to explain relationship among variables

Learning Outcome

1: Explain the techniques of data collection, tabulation and presentation of data.

2: Infer the results of statistical analysis.

3: Apply statistical tools specific skills to analyze the business and management problems

4: Explain the relationship among variables.

5: Interpret regression/time series equations to analyze the effect of independent variables on the dependent variables

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Statistics
 

Meaning, Definition, Features, Importance and limitations of statistics. Meaning and difference between primary and secondary data, data collection methods. Classification and tabulation of data including tally marks, methods of classifying data - quantitative, qualitative, geographical, chronological, Discrete and continuous frequency distribution

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Measures of Central Tendency
 

Meaning, measures of Central Tendency- Arithmetic Mean, Weighted Arithmetic Mean, median, mode, geometric mean and harmonic mean (only theory) and partition values- quartiles, deciles, percentiles

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Measures of Dispersion and Skewness
 

Meaning, Definitions, Properties of dispersion - Range, Quartile Deviation, Mean Deviation from Mean and Median, Standard Deviation and coefficient of variation. Skewness-meaning, difference between dispersion and skewness, Karl Pearson’s and Bowley’s measures of skewness

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Correlation and Regression
 

Meaning, Definition and Use of Correlation, Scatter diagram, Types of correlation, Karl Pearson’s correlation coefficient, Spearman’s Rank correlation, Probable Error. Regression- Meaning and utility of Regression analysis, Comparison between Correlation and Regression, regression lines –X on Y, Yon X, Regression Equations and Regression Coefficients. Introduction to Logistic regression

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Time Series
 

Meaning, Components of time series, Calculation of Secular Trend-Moving Average method – odd and even period moving average and method of Least Squares

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Probability and Probability distributions
 

Introduction to Probability, Basic Concepts of Probability, Probability Distributions – Binomial, Poisson and Normal distributions, Expected Value

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:12
Sampling Distribution and Introduction to Inferential statistics
 

Introduction to testing of Hypothesis: Procedure for testing hypothesis - Setting of Hypothesis -Null and alternative hypotheses, Estimation, Computation of Test statistics, - Types of errors in hypothesis testing - Level of significance - Critical region and value - Decision making.   Test of significance for Large and small sample tests, Z and t tests for mean and proportion, one-way ANOVA,Chi-square test for goodness of fit and independence of attributes. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Sharma J. K (2020) Business Statistics 5th edition Delhi: Vikas Publishing House

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Levin R. I.& Rubin D. S. (2014). Statistics for Management. Delhi: Pearson.
  2. Pillai &Bagavathi (2016) Statistics, Theory and Practice, S Chand Publishing
  3. SP Gupta (2017).Statistical Methods, Sultan Chand and Sons
  4. SC Gupta (2018). Fundamentals of Statistics, Himalaya Publishing House
Evaluation Pattern

Component of Final Grade

Max Marks per Component

Weightage towards Final Grade

Total Marks per Component in Final Grade

CIA-I 

20

20 %

20

CIA-II

50

25 %

25

CIA-III 

20

20%

20

End – Term

50

30 %

30

Attendance

5

5 %

5

Total

   

100

BBA233 - MACRO ECONOMICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course intends to provide the basics of macroeconomic theory and policies in order to understand the influence of external environment in doing business. The students are expected to understand the various macroeconomic variables that determine income, output and employment.

Course Objectives: 

 

  • To provide a strong base of macroeconomic principles and concepts relevant in managerial decision making. 

  • To enable the students to apply the knowledge in managerial decision making process. 

  • To enable the students to prescribe policies in the light of changing macroeconomic scenario.

Learning Outcome

On having completed this course student should be able to:

 

CLO1 Provide a strong base of macroeconomic principles and concepts relevant in managerial decision making.

CLO2 Enable the students to apply the knowledge in managerial decision making process.

CLO3 Enable the students to prescribe policies in the light of changing macroeconomic scenario.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Measuring a Nation?s Income and Cost of Living
 

Economy’s Income and Expenditure-Measurement of GDP- Components of GDP- Real versus Nominal GDP- The GDP Deflator; The Consumer Price Index (CPI)-Calculation of CPI- GDP Deflator versus CPI- Correcting economic variables for the effects of inflation- Real and Nominal Interest Rates-Limitations

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Production and Growth
 

Economic Growth around the world: Productivity: Its Role and Determinants-Economic Growth and Public Policy- Investment-Human Capital

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Goods and Money Market
 

Saving and Investment in the National Income Accounts- The Market for Loanable Funds- Policy Changes and Impact on the Loanable fund Market; Money-  Meaning and Functions-Money Supply; Full Reserve Banking and Fractional Reserve Banking- Central Bank Tools of Monetary Control; Classical Theory of Inflation- Classical Dichotomy and Monetary Neutrality- Velocity and Quantity equation-  Fisher Effect- Costs of Inflation.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
Unemployment
 

Identifying Unemployment-Labour Force- Unemployment Rate- Labour Force Participation- Types of Unemployment-Unemployment Insurance- Minimum Wage Laws.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Aggregate Demand, Aggregate Supply and Influence of Monetary and Fiscal Policy on Aggregate Demand
 

Three Key Facts about Economic Fluctuations- Short run Economic Fluctuations-Aggregate Demand Curve, Aggregate Supply Curve, Two Causes of Economic Fluctuations; Monetary Policy Influence on Aggregate Demand- The Theory of Liquidity Preference; Fiscal Policy influence on Aggregate Demand- The Multiplier Effect- Crowding out effect- Stabilisation Policy; Active Versus Automatic Stabilizers

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Short Run Tradeoff between Inflation and Unemployment
 

The Philips Curve-Shifts in Philips Curve and the Role of Expectations-Shifts in Philips Curve and  The Role of Supply Shocks; The Cost of Reducing Inflation Rational Expectations and the Possibility of Costless Disinflation

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:8
Six Debates over Macroeconomic Policy
 

Economic Stabilization-Monetary vs. Fiscal Policy ; Handling Recession- Higher Spending vs. Tax Cuts; Monetary Policy-Rule vs. Discretion Based;  Central Bank Goal: Zero  vs. Non-zero Inflation; Government Budget- Balanced vs. Unbalanced; Tax Laws for Savings –Reformed vs. Not Reformed

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • N. Gregory Mankiw (2015), Principles of Macroeconomics, 7th Edition, Cengage Learning India.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

  1. N. Gregory Mankiw (2019), Principles of Economics, 7th Edition, Cengage Learning India

  2. Ackley, G. (1976) Macroeconomics, Theory and Policy, Macmillan Publishing Company, New York.

  3. Ackley, G. (1976) Macroeconomics, Theory and Policy, Macmillan Publishing Company, New York.

  4. Stanley Fischer and Rudiger Dornbusch (1981) Macro Economics, London: Mac Graw-Hill.

  5. D.N Dwivedi (2010) Macroeconomics:Theory and Policy, Mac Graw-Hill: NewDelhi

  6. C. Rangarajan and B.H Dholakia (1979) Principles of Macroeconomics Tata McGraw-Hill Education

  7. Keynes, J.M. (1936), The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, Macmillan, London H. L Ahuja (2019) Principles of Microeconomics, S Chand Publishing, New Delhi

Evaluation Pattern

 

 

Component of Final Grade

Max Marks per Component

Weightage towards Final Grade

Total Marks per Component in Final Grade

CIA-I 

20

20 %

20

CIA-II

50

25 %

25

CIA-III 

20

20%

20

End – Term

50

30 %

30

Attendance

5

5 %

5

Total

   

100

BBFT211N - FOUNDATIONS IN QUANTITATIVE FINANCE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The objective of this course is to provide comprehensive coverage of foundations in Quantitative Finance. This course covers the practical aspects of statistical analysis and modeling in Finance, building Financial Econometrics models, Portfolio Modeling and complex Time value concepts useful in Capital Budgeting and Corporate Finance.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To demonstrating understanding of financial mathematics

CO2: To apply the concepts of Statistics in Finance Model

CO3: To evaluate (analyze/examine) portfolios with the help of mathematical modelling

CO4: To propose financial models with the application of econometrics

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Financial Mathematics
 

Time Value concepts, Present Value, Future Value, Net Present Value, IRR, Compounding, Practical applications to stock and bond valuations, Applications to Corporate Finance, Applications to Capital Budgeting

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to Calculus
 

Taylor’s Theorem, Application to Bond Pricing, Introduction to Stochastic Calculus

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Statistics for Finance
 

Probability Distribution models in Finance, Statistical Finance concepts, Analyzing empirical financial distributions, Case Study – Empirical Analysis of Financial datasets, Factor Models

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Mathematics for Portfolio Modeling
 

Portolfio Mathematics, Portfolio Risk Calculations, Portfolio/Basket Correlation, Transition Matrix Calculations, Default Probability Mathematics , Portfolio Value-at-Risk

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Essential Financial Econometrics
 

Modeling Asset Returns and Volatility, Term Structure Modeling, Multiple Regression in Financial Models, Problems and Solutions, Principal Component Analysis

Text Books And Reference Books:

Market Risk Analysis, Quantitative Methods in Finance (Volume 1) by Carol Alexander, First Edition, John Wiley & Sons

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

        Market Risk Analysis, Practical Financial Econometrics (Volume 2) by Carol Alexander, First Edition, John Wiley & Sons

        Applied Quantitative Finance edited by Wolfgang Karl Härdle, Cathy Yi-Hsuan Chen, Ludger Overbeck, Third Edition, Springer

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA- 30

ESE - 70

BBFT212N - WORKING WITH SPREADSHEETS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

In this course you will learn the basic functions of excel through guided demonstration. Each week you will build on your excel skills and be provided an opportunity to practice what you’ve learned. Finally, you will have a chance to put your knowledge to work in a mini project. Please note, the content in this course was developed using a Windows version of Excel 2013.

The course of 3 credits. 2 hours will be delivered through synchronous mode 2 sessions per week of 1 hour each. The students will also complete a MOOC course on “Excel” of at least 15 hours.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate an understanding of fundamentals of Excel. .(PLG5.1)

CO2: Apply different formulas and functions in Excel. (PLG5.1)

CO3: Build Charts to represent numeric data in multiple formats (5.1)

CO4: Analyse data using excel. (PLG5.3)

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:4
Introduction to Spreadsheet
 

Understanding Microsoft Excel, Excel Workbook Windows, Basic Spreadsheet Skills, Excel Help System, Opening and Closing Workbooks, Understanding Workbook File Formats, Creating New Workbooks, Selecting Cells, Auto Sum and Auto Fill Function, Cell Referencing and Request, Formatting Cells, Formatting Numbers, Placing Cell Alignment, Cell, Rows and Columns, Understanding Worksheets

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:3
Basic functions
 

Editing, Copying and Moving Cells, Page Layouts in Excel, Proofing Workbook, Basic Options, Ribbons and Toolbar, AutoFilter, Advanced Filters, Managing Windows, Multiple Windows, Splitting Windows, Freezing Panes, Linking Data, Basics’ Assessment

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:3
Charts
 

Understand Charts, Chart Design Options and Tools, Chart Format Tools, Combo Charts

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Advanced Functions
 

Functions within Excel, Understanding Date Function, Super Power, Array Formulae, Advanced Range Names, What If analysis?, Information Functions, Logical Functions, Using Text to Columns, the Paste Special Function, Tracking Changes in Excel, Merging and Compare Excel Workbooks, Data Validation, Subtotals and Grouping, Consolidating Data

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Data Analysis
 

Data analysis in Excel using classic tools, such as pivot tables, pivot c harts, vlookup and slicers, solver, Excel data model, DAX expression, Power Query add-in in Excel 2019 , build an Excel data model from a single flat table. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

ttps://www.tutorialspoint.com/advanced_excel/index.htm

Evaluation Pattern

Countinuous Internal Assessments

BBFT234N - FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND SERVICES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is to make students familiarize with various aspects of Indian financial system. This will provide the students with an overall understanding of various components of Indian financial system.

To familiarize the students about the financial institutions and Services

 To make students understand about the money market and capital market operations

 To enhance the knowledge of the students about the roles of various financial institutions.

 To provide knowledge to the students related to the banking operations.

 To familiarize the students about various financial services.

 

 To make students understand about international financial markets.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand the structure of financial system and the functioning of specialized financial institutions and markets.

CO2: Explain the functioning of money markets and capital markets.

CO3: Identify the role of various financial institutions in the economy.

CO4: Understand the different operations in the banking services.

CO5: Assess the role of various financial services in the economy.

CO6: Explain the functioning of International financial market.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to financial system
 

Meaning-Structure- Functions-Components of financial system -Financial system and economic development- Reforms in Financial Sector in India

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Capital Market
 

Meaning –Classification- Functions- Types-Primary market-Secondary market-functioning of various stock exchanges-NSE, BSE, OTCEI-Derivatives Market- Government Securities market- SEBI-Reforms in capital markets.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Money Market
 

Meaning-Significance-Structure-Features of money market—Money market instruments-Reforms in money market.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Financial Institutions
 

Meaning & Functions -Banking institutions-Scheduled commercial banks and scheduled cooperative banks-Functions of commercial banks, Capital Structure of commercial banks, BASEL Norms.

Non-Banking Institutions-NBFCs and Development Finance institutions-Insurance and Housing Finance Companies -IRDA

RBI-Functions-Monetary policy-Credit Policy

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Banking Service
 

Deposit Schemes- Loan Schemes and Other Modern Services-Mechanism of E-Banking & Internet Banking, Mobile Banking & Telephone Banking, ATM & Electronic Money (Credit Cards) ,Electronic Funds Transfer System (RTGS and NEFT) & Modern Banking Services

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Financial Services
 

Meaning-Types-Leasing- Hire purchase- Mutual funds- Factoring -Credit rating- Venture Capital-Recent developments in financial services industry, GIFT

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
International Financial Markets
 

Nature, Organization and Participants- Offshore Financing Instruments- Foreign Exchange market – International Financial Tech Cities

Text Books And Reference Books:

Pathak, B. (2013) Indian Financial System . New Delhi: Pearson education.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1)       Desai, V. (2010)Indian Financial System. Mumbai: Himalaya publishers.

2)       Gordon, N. (2014). Indian Financial System. Mumbai: Himalaya publishers.

3)       Khan, M.Y. (2009). Indian Financial System . New Delhi: McGraw-Hill.

4)       Sharma, G. (2014). Indian Financial System. Ludhiana: Kalyani publishers.

 

Evaluation Pattern

ESE 70

CIA 30

BBFT281N - SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY PROJECT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:100
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course intends to sensitize the students towards social issues faced by the society and to enable students to understand the role played by the Non-Governmental Organisation (NGOs) in addressing these social issues. This course intends to bring about a change in students’ perspective towards these social issues and make them aware about their role in helping the society overcome such social issues. The purpose of writing project report is to communicate the learning of the project study undertaken on a particular NGO, in partial fulfillment of BBA  program. It is a time-bound and independent study guided by a faculty member 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Identify the socially sensitive areas of research

CO2: Examine the social issues faced by the society

CO3: Improve the attitude towards service and future commitment

CO4: Develop a project report

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Village Exposure Camp
 

Each student is expected to complete the village exposure camp organized by the Department in collaboration with Centre for Social Action (CSA).The students will be participating in different community activities to get sensitized with different social issues faced by these villages.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
NGO Visit
 

Students should identify an NGO and work for minimum of 25 hrs during the semester on any socially relevant projects of NGO’s

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Service Learning Report
 

It consists of two parts-

first a report on village visit

       and

Second part on visit to NGO.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Rough Draft Submission
 

Rough Draft Submission Approval of Rough Draft by the Guides

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Final Report
 

Final soft Bound Report

Text Books And Reference Books:

N/A

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

N/A

Evaluation Pattern

Component of Final Grade

Max Marks per Component

Weightage towards Final Grade

Total Marks per Component in Final Grade

VIVA-VOCE

50

50 %

50

REPORT EVALUATION

50

50 %

50

Total

 

 

100

BECO291BN - DESINGING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course introduces the idea of sustainable development and how it forms an organizing principle for meeting the human development goals. The course discuss how sustainability goals can address the global challenges like inequality, poverty, environmental degradation, climate change, etc. The course will also provide an in-depth view of how sustainability can be linked to social development, economic development and environmental protection; and how an interplay of multiple factors is key for achieving the 2030 agenda for sustainable development goals.

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the idea of sustainable development and social/public policies within that context. The course discusses the challenges of sustainable development, and of designing policies for it, in a global setting. It examines the interplay of politics and economics, with emphasis on modes and instruments of producing public policy. This course will:

• acquaint students to significant discourses and issues in policy design and intervention with regards to sustainable development;

• help them understand how political ideology, interests and power influence economic actions, processes and planning at the macro level;

• through class discussions acquaint students to ideas agenda setting and policy dynamics in the context of sustainable development goals (SDGs);

• train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss complex ideas.

Learning Outcome

CO1: ? acquaint students to significant discourses and issues in policy design and intervention with regards to sustainable development ? help them understand how political ideology, interests and power influence economic actions, processes and planning at the macro level.

CO2: ? through class discussions acquaint students to ideas agenda setting and policy dynamics in the context of sustainable development goals (SDGs). ? train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss complex ideas.

CO3: ? appreciate the concept of development goals and the emergence of SDGs. ? understand the interplay between politics and economics and how that influences the decisions at state level;

CO4: ? identify and examine some the major themes in public policy intervention and measurement of SDGs; ? effectively communicate complex ideas through written and oral presentation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Institutional and Historical Background
 

The Historical Roots of the Field; Emergence of Schools of Public Policy; Sustainable Development Goals – the Concept

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Modes of Policy Analysis
 

Policy Analysis as Puzzle Solving; Policy Analysis as Critique; The Tools of Government in the Information Age;

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Producing Public Policy: Process, Challenges and Constraints
 

Agenda Setting; Arguing, Bargaining and Getting Agreement; Reframing Problematic Policies; Challenges of achieving the SDGs in the context of: Economic Constraints on Public Policy; Political Feasibility: Interests and Power; and Institutional Constraints on Policy

Text Books And Reference Books:

Moran, M., Rein, M., & Goodin, R. E. (2006). The Oxford Handbook of Public Policy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Addison, T., Harper, C., Prowse, M., Shepherd, A., Armando Barrientos, with, Braunholtz- Speight, T., … Zohir, S. (2009). The Chronic Poverty Report 2008–09. Retrieved from https://www.odi.org/sites/odi.org.uk/files/odi-assets/publications-opinion- files/2566.pdf

Bellinger, W. K. (2007). The Economic Analysis of Public Policy. Routledge.

Griggs, D., Stafford-Smith, M., Gaffney, O., Rockström, J., Öhman, M. C., Shyamsundar, P., ... & Noble, I. (2013). Policy: Sustainable Development Goals for People and Planet. Nature, 495(7441), 305-307.

Hausman, D. M., & McPherson, M. S. (2006). Economic Analysis, Moral Philosophy, and Public Policy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Kates, R. W., Parris, T. M., &Leiserowitz, A. A. (2005). What is Sustainable Development? Goals, Indicators, Values, and Practice. Environment(Washington DC), 47(3), 8-21.

Mehta, A. K. (2002). Chronic Poverty in India: Overview Study. CPRC Working Paper 7.

Retrieved from http://www.chronicpoverty.org/uploads/publication_files/CRPC- IIPA_2.pdf

 

Sachs, J. D. (2012). From Millennium Development Goals to Sustainable Development Goals. The Lancet, 379(9832), 2206-2211.

Evaluation Pattern

Course title

MSE (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Attendance

DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

45%

50%

5%

BECO291CN - ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS AND ITS INTERLINKAGE WITH INDUSTRY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The primary aim of this course is to introduce students to the concept  of environmental economics, linkage between nature and economy, natural resource economics and Industrialisation and Its Impact on Environment. In the context of the interlinkage between environment concerns and industry, the course intends to raise awareness about the importance and feasibility of green industry approaches, green industrial policy and green recovery mechanism in the background of post COVID-19 crisis and 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

The goal  is to acquaint students with the scientific approach to the study of man and environment by bringing to life subject matter of the infant science of environmental economics emphasizing its connections with socio economic conditions. Real world examples and applications are used to make subjects interesting to students of this new discipline.

In addition to this, the goal is to provide participants with an understanding of green industrial policy, identify urgent actions and strategies to promote green industry and sustainable industrial development including cleaner and resource efficient production.

.Course Objectives

This course will:

·         Introduce students to the environment, industry and economy linkage;

·           Discuss the economics of resource use;

·         Examine the economics of Environmental Quality;

       Discuss the vision towards green industrialization

       To understand  the key challenges towards acceleration of greening SMEs

      To understand the interlinkages between green industry, trade and global supply chain

Learning Outcome

CO1: Have a practical knowledge and understanding of the environment, and its interlinkage with industry.

CO2: To understand the green strategies, its roles and its challenges in the context of industrialization.

CO3: To understand the application of environmental resources and policies in the day to day life.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT 1: Origins and scope of environmental economics
 

Defining the interlinkage between economics and environment , Origins and  scope of environmental economics , The first two laws of thermodynamics,defining environmental policies, strategies and their applications,

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
UNIT 2: Economics of Resource Use
 

Classification of Resource. Renewable and non-renewable Resources. Theories of Natural Resource Use, The Role of Time in Economics: Discounting.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT 3: Environmental Economics and Green Industrialization
 

Environmental Kuznets curve, Policy, Need for Green Industrial Development, Industry 4.0, Industrial Parks,  Green jobs and government policies in the context of green industrialization

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:13
UNIT 4: Interlinkages between green industrialization, global trade and global value chain
 

Definition and understanding of Global Value chain,  Green Industrialization and global trade, Challenges to adopt Green related products and services, Finance and Investment for green industrial development.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Field, B. C., & Field, M. K. (2017). Environmental economics an introduction. The McGraw-Hill.

Environmental Economics -An Integrated Approach -Philip E Graves

Bhattacharya, R. N. (Ed.). (2001). Environmental Economics: An Indian Perspective. Oxford University Press, USA.

Balsdon, E., & Kolstad, C. D. (1999). Environmental Economics. Oxford University Press.

Squires, G. (2012). Urban and environmental economics: An introduction. Routledge.

Altenburg, T., and Assmann. C. (Eds) (2017), Green Industrial Policy: Concept, Policies, Country Experiences. Geneva, Bonn: UN Environment; German Development Institute.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

OECD (2012),  Green Growth and Developing countries: A summary of Policy Makers

OECD (2012),  Green Growth and Developing Countries. OECD Consultation Draft.

Building Competitive green industries: The Climate and Clean Technology. Opportunity for Developing countries. World Bank Group. www. infodev.org.

UNIDO (2010), “A Greener Footprint for Industry-Opportunities and Challenges of Sustainable Industrial Development”.

Financing for SMEs in Sustainable Global Value Chains.

https://www.gpfi.org/sites/gpfi/files/documents/GVC%20paper_highres_0.pdf

UNEP (2016), Green Finance for Developing Countries, Needs, Concerns and Innovations.

https://www.cbd.int/financial/gcf/unep-greendeveloping2016.pdf

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

Total

30

30

30

10

100

BENG291BN - GLOBAL ETHICS FOR CONTEMPORARY SOCIETIES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will introduce students to the major theoretical and applied debates as well as major moral puzzles and challenges in the field of global ethics. Ethics is gaining ground as an important humanities intervention in a fast-changing world.  

A course on ethics is often an added advantage for students as it helps them shape a  socially aware perspective of the social reality.  

Drawing on interdisciplinary perspectives and thematic issues in the fields of international politics, business, communications and law, the course will challenge students to reflect on major ethical theories and traditions as well as core problems such as corporate governance, global distributive justice, the ethics of making and sustaining peace, media ethics and legal dimensions of ethics.  

By combining the works of both classic and contemporary philosophers with contemporary applied global issues, students will be able to critically reflect on fundamental normative questions from an interdisciplinary perspective and reflect on the rights, responsibilities and challenges of ‘good global citizenship.

Learning Objectives: On completing the course, students will be able to 

● Open-mindedly consider different viewpoints in moral controversies.  

● Identify the strengths and weaknesses of different philosophical and popular arguments on the various topics.  

● Demonstrate understanding of the major moral philosophical approaches and techniques in moral reasoning.  

 ● Formulate and critically assess personal positions/convictions. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Analyze various ethical dilemmas present in society and efficiently present them in form of classroom debates and discussions.

CO2: Demonstrate a clear understanding of various schools of thought in the domain of ethics through their assignments.

CO3: Appraise their views on various aspects of ethics and present them with clarity through multiple engagements in the classroom.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Unit-1: Introduction
 

Global Ethics: Conceptual Definitions, Historical Origins & Present Challenges  Introduction to the course Ethics, Morals and Values Cultural Relativism vs  Universalism (case study)  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Ethical Theories
 

Rationalist Ethical Theories; Contractualist ethics, Deontological Ethics, Utilitarian  Ethics, Discourse ethics, Alternatives to Ethical Rationalism Virtue Ethics Feminist &  Care Ethics Postmodernist Ethics  

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Applying Ethical Theories
 

Ethics of International Aid and Development: Humanitarian Aid in Conflict Zones  Global Distributive Justice and Global Poverty: Models for International Economic  Justice Ethics of War: Torture in Abu Ghraib (Case Study)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Ethics of Making and Sustaining Peace
 

Rohingya Issues: Are humanitarian interventions justified? The case study of  Myanmar/Burma Global Environmental and Climate Ethics: Trade Agreements and  Global Environmental Ethics Global Business Ethics and Arms Trade: The Ethics of  Capitalism (Film Inside Job)

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Ethics of International Law
 

Natural Resources Extraction from the Kimberley process towards universal  legislation (Movie: Blood Diamond), Global Journalism Ethics, Digital Media Ethics  and Whistleblowing Practices: Snowden and Whistleblowing Ethical Implications of  Emerging Technologies: Genetics, stem cell and embryo research: Embryo research  and women’s rights

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Hutchings, K. (2010) Global Ethics. An Introduction, Polity: Cambridge.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Copp, D. (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory, Oxford: OUP. 

Graham, G. (2008) Ethics and International Relations, 2nd Edition. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

LaFollette, H. (ed.) (2003) The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Practice, Oxford: OUP.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

Total

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Attendance

100

45%

50%

5%

Mid Semester Examination:

Group/Individual Assignment

45 Marks

 

End Semester Examination: 

Group/Individual Assignment

50 Marks

BPSY291AN - APPRECIATING AESTHETICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to explore the phenomenon of aesthetics from a multidisciplinary perspective. Further, it helps the students to get exposed to a multidisciplinary approach to understanding realities.

Course Objectives: At the end of the course, students will be able to:

Understand the philosophy behind aesthetics

Understand human perception of aesthetics

Appreciate morality and aesthetic judgments

Take cognizance of the influence of technology on aesthetics

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Discuss about the philosophy behind human aesthetics

CO2: Appreciate aesthetics from multiple perspectives

CO3: Create aesthetically appealing products

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Aesthetics
 

Origin of modern aesthetics; the philosophy behind Aesthetics

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Aesthetic Mind
 

Psychology of Aesthetics; morality; aesthetic judgements; appreciation of the environment

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Functional Aesthetics
 

Globalization and Technological influence on Aesthetics; digital interface; military; fashion; culture; art and architecture

Text Books And Reference Books:

Kivy, P. (Ed.). (2009). The Blackwell guide to aesthetics. John Wiley & Sons.                

Hughes, F. (2009). Kant's Critique of Aesthetic Judgement': A Reader's Guide. Bloomsbury Publishing.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Carlson, A. (2002). Aesthetics and the environment: The appreciation of nature, art and architecture. Psychology Press.

Schellekens, E., & Goldie, P. (Eds.). (2011). The aesthetic mind: Philosophy and psychology. Oxford University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Individual Assignment

Mid-Semester Exam

Group Assignment

Attendance

25

45

25

05

BPSY291BN - HUMAN ENGINEERING AND ERGONOMICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course will cover topics related to human engineering and ergonomics more from a psychological perspective. Students will get to learn cognitive, social, organizational, and safety aspects of the result of man-machine interaction. This course provides an overview of the design and strategies of the system for an effective understanding of the man-machine interface. 

 

Course Objectives: To enable students:

Understand resultant factors of man-machine interaction.

Cognize with pertinent factors related to increasing the efficiency of people in their working environment.

Develop the competency of theoretical understanding for human engineering and ergonomics.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Explain how man-machine interaction is an important aspect to work upon for increasing the efficiency of the people. Outline factors which are important for making an optimum working space and conditions.

CO2: To provide the student with an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge into practical situations

CO3: Reflect on and describe their personal attitudes and values that relate to Human factors and ergonomics

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Human Engineering and Ergonomics
 

Introduction to human engineering and ergonomics; Human factors engineering and systems design; Sensation and perception;

Cross-cultural design; Mental workload and situation awareness.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Job, Equipment, Workplace and Environmental Design
 

Task design and motivation; Job and team design; Workplace design;

Sound and noise; Illumination.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Design for Health, Safety and Comfort
 

Health and safety management: Organization and public spaces; Warnings and hazard communications; Design for people with functional limitations; Design for aging.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hancock, Peter. A. (Ed.). (1999). Human performance and ergonomics. Academic Press.

Lee, J. D., Wickens, C. D., Liu, Y. & Boyle, L. N. (2017). Designing for people: An introduction to human factors engineering. CreateSpace. 

Guastello, S. J. (2014). Human factors engineering and ergonomics. CRC Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Salvendy, G. (Ed.). (2012). Handbook of human factors and ergonomics. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Helander, M. (2006). A Guide to Human factors and ergonomics. Taylor & Francis

Evaluation Pattern

 

Individual Assignment

Mid-Semester Exam

Group Assignment

Attendance

25

45

25

05

ENG221N - ENGLISH - II (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 
  • To expose learners to a variety of texts to interact with
  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  • To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information
  • To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes
  • To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning
  • To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning
  • To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expressions
  • To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes.

CO2: Understand and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

CO3: Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class

CO4: Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Presentation Skills

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Food
 

1. Long text: Witches’ Loaves-   O Henry

2. Short text: Portion size is the trick!!!  by Ranjani Raman

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Report Writing

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Fashion
 

1.Long text: In the Height of Fashion-Henry Lawson

2. short text: Crazy for Fashion- Babatunde Aremu

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Architecture
 

1. long text: Bharat Bhavan/ Charles Correa by Bart Bryant-Mole

2. Short text: The Plain Sense of Things By Wallace Stevens

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Group Discussion

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Interview Skills and CV Writing

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Management
 

1.Long Text: The Story of Mumbai Dabbawalas- Shivani Pandita

2. Short Text:  If  By Rudyard Kupling

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
History
 

1. Long text: Who were the Shudras? 

By Dr. Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar

2. Short text: Dhauli

By JayantaMahapatra

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Developing Arguments: Debating

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
War
 

1. Long text: An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

By Ambrose Bierce

2. Short text: Strange meeting

By Wilfred Owen

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Letter Writing and Email writing

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Ethics of writing on Social Media Platforms

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Social Media
 

1.Long text: Facebook and the Epiphanator: An End to Endings?

 By Paul Ford

2. Short text: 'Truth in the time of Social Media' by Girish Balachandran

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
Visual Text
 

BBC Documentary- Dabbawalas

Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

teacher manual and worksheets that teachers would provide. Listening skills worksheets.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1- 20

MSE- 50

CIA 3- 20

ESE- 50 

ENG291AN - CREATIVE WRITING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will be helpful to introduce representative literary texts and analyze the craft behind creating a literary work, specifically focusing on the art of fiction writing.

 

This course is designed across five units; the first four units are—

 

1.     Introduction to plot (10 hours)

2.     Character Development (10 hours)

3.     World building(setting) (10 hours)

4.     Developing your personal style (10 hours)

5.     Drafting the story (5 hours)

 

This will give the students a hands-on practice to refine their fiction writing skills. The final unit of 5 hours will pay attention to writing the first draft of the story, getting the story reviewed among the peers, using the criticism to improve the text and finally, rewrite and submit a fine-tuned summative text. This course will aid the students to communicate their thoughts in the form of a literary work while also engaging with the works of their peers and offer constructive criticism. It will also equip them with essential editing and close reading skills while engaging with the critical thinking faculties and creativity. 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: · Identify, analyze and interpret the themes and ideas present in literary texts.

CO2: · Learn how a literary work of art can create a cultural and societal impact.

CO3: · Produce original literary fiction pieces.

CO4: · Engage with the literary tradition productively.

CO5: · Understand and differentiate between different genres of writing.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to plot
 

Sl no

Activity

1

What is plot? How Plot works in Literature  

2

Character+ Action = Plot, Writing Exercise

3

Aristotle’s idea of plot  

4

The power of Structure, ABDCE structure

5

Writing practice

6

Introduction to a good scene:  Show Don’t tell

7

Writing practice

8

Editing

9

The whole story

10

Review and Revise

 

 

 

Reference (For the current Unit)

Plot and Structure, James Scott Bell (2004)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Character Development
 

Sl no

Activity

1

Discover Characters from life

2

Conception

3

Desire and Goals: building characters- writing practice

4

Creating relatable characters

5

Observation writing

6

Dialogue and monologue, conversation

7

Point of view

8

Quirks

9

Voice

10

Point of view writing exercise

 

 

Reference (For the current Unit)

Creating Character Arcs: The Masterful Author's Guide to Uniting Story Structure, K M Weiland

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
World building(setting)
 

 

Sl no

Activity

1

Creating a persuasive world

2

Writing activity

3

Adding Details

4

Writing activity  

5

Credibility and research

6

Meditation exercise

7

Fantastic landscape writing exercise

8

Genre-

9

Landscape description examples from literature  

10

Writing activity

 

 

Reference (For the current Unit)

The Writing Book: A Workbook for Fiction Writers, Kate Grenville

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Developing your personal style
 

Sl no

Activity

1

Meaning, Sense and Clarity

2

Language rules and structure  

3

Word choice exercise

4

Nouns and verbs- close reading exercise

5

Writing exercise

6

Effective editing

7

Thinking like the reader  

8

Reflective activity  

9

Reading different styles and identifying personal style

10

Writing exercise

 

 

Reference (For the current Unit)

The Elements of Style, William Strunk Jr. and E. B. White

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Portfolio
 

Peer Review and Revision

Final Submission

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

·      Julia Bell and Paul Magrs, The Creative Writing Coursebook (Macmillan, 2001)

·      Anne Bernays & Pamela Painter What If? Writing Exercises for Fiction Writers (Harper Collins, 1990)

·      Ailsa Cox, Writing Short Stories (Routledge, 2016)

·      A.L. Kennedy, On Writing (Vintage, 2014)

·      Ursula K Le Guin, Steering the Craft: A Twenty-first Century Guide to Sailing the Sea of Story (Mariner, 2015)

·      Sara Maitland, The Writer’s Way (Arcturus, 2005)

·      Nicola Morgan, Write to be Published (Snowbooks, 2011)

·      David Morley, The Cambridge Introduction to Creative Writing (Cambridge University Press, 2007)

·      Jerome Stern, Making Shapely Fiction (Norton, 1991)

·      S. King, On Writing

·      N. Goldberg, Writing Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer Within. Boston: Shambala Press, 1986.

·      R. Wolf, Jump Start: How to Write from Everyday Life. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2001

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

The students will be provided with fictional reading material(excerpts or full texts) in each class to facilitate discussion.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment (Nature of CIAs)

Weightage

1

CIA I : The plot

30

2

CIA II : Character Development project

30

3

CIA III : Final portfolio

30

4

Class Participation

05

5

Attendance

05

 

Total

100

HIN222N - HINDI (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:50
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The text book “Samakaleen Kahaniyam” is a story collection edited by Dr. Vanaja and Published by Rajpal and sons. New Delhi.  In this semester film appreciation is one of  the unit. To emphasize on Functional Hindi, Movie Review and Business letters are also included in this syllabus.

Learning Outcome

CO1: students will get to know about the world of Hindi fiction particularly short stories.

CO2: It helps them to improve their writing and analytical skills and film appreciation makes them know more about the thematic and technical aspects of Cinema.

CO3: They will be able to write business letters in Hindi.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:25
Samakaleen Kahaniyan
 

Story Collection -Samakaleen Kahaniyan

 

Samakaleen ‘Kahanyan ’ Ed by Dr.Vanaja, Pub.by Rajpal and Sons, Kashmiri Gate, New Delhi-6

All the lessons to be studied except 'Valentines day".

Level of knowledge: Analytical.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Film Studies
 

Film Personalities 

Adoor Gopalakrishnan,Girish Kasaravalli,Satyajith Rai,Shyam Benega and Dada Saheb Phalke.

 English-Vinglish,Ankur,Theesari Kasam and Dangal.                                                  

Level of knowledge: Conceptual

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Letter Writing
 

Patra Lekhan (Business letter writing)

Avedan, Bank, Bima, Agency

Level of knowledge: Basic

Text Books And Reference Books:

Samakaleen Kahaniyam ’Ed by:Dr.Vanaja

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Samakaleen Kahaniyam’ (Full Text) Ed by:Dr.Vanaja, Pub. by Rajpal and Sons, Kashmiri Gate, New Delhi-6.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-1 - 10%

CIA-2(Mid semester examination) -   25%

CIA-3 - 10%

Attendance - 5%

End semester examination - 50%

BBA331 - FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

Financial Management is an introductory core course that is offered with the intent to equip the students with the basic knowledge of finance theory and its application to develop relevant financial strategies pertinent to profit-seeking organisations. The theme of financial management is structured around three decision making financial areas: Investment- long term as well as working capital, Financing, and Dividend policy. This imbibes students with analytical and decision-making skills in managing finance through the application of theoretical questions and practical problems.

Course Objectives: 

  • To understand the basics of finance function and the concepts of financial management
  • To apply the knowledge in taking finance decisions
  • To develop analytical skills to identify financial management problems and solve them.
  • To analyse the relationship among capital structure, cost of capital, dividend decisions, and value of the business.
  • To assess a firm’s requirement for long-term assets by applying capital budgeting techniques

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand the principles and concepts of financial management.

CO2: Demonstrate the motives behind financial decision-making.

CO3: Interpret the relevant theories and concepts of various practices of financial management.

CO4: Analyze the relationship among capital structure cost of capital, dividend decisions, and value of the business.

CO5: Evaluate and decide on the long-term assets which are profitable to the business by applying capital budgeting techniques

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to financial management
 

Level of knowledge:  Basic                                                                                                  

Meaning of finance and financial management, Types of finance – public and private finance , classification of private finance – personal finance, business finance and finance of non-profit organization Importance and Scope of financial management, Approaches to finance function Relationship of finance with other business functions, Objectives of financial management – profit maximization and wealth maximization - merits and criticisms Financial decisions, Internal relation of financial decisions, Factors influencing financial decisions Functional areas of financial management, Functions of a finance manager. 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Sources of finance and Capitalization
 

Level of knowledge: Conceptual

Ownership securities – Equity shares, Preference shares, Deferred shares, No par stock/shares, Shares with differential rights, Sweat Equity Creditorship securities – Debentures – Zero coupon bonds, Zero interest bonds, Callable bonds, Deep discount bonds Internal financing or ploughing back of profit – factors affecting ploughing back of profits – merits and demerits Loan financing – short term and long term sources. Meaning of capitalization – Theories of capitalization – cost theory and earnings theory. Over capitalization and under capitalization – causes – effects and remedies, Watered stock, Over trading and under trading

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Capital Structure
 

Level of knowledge: Conceptual                                                                                          

Meaning of capital structure and financial structure, principles of capital structure, optimum capital structure, determinants of capital structure, theories of capital structure and EPS – practical problems. Point of indifference, capital gearing

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Cost of capital and Leverages
 

Level of knowledge: Conceptual / Analytical                                                          

Meaning of cost of capital, significance of cost of capital, components of cost of capital – computation of cost of capital and Weighted Average Cost of Capital – practical problems. Meaning of leverage, types of leverages – operating, financial and combined leverage, risk and leverage – practical problems

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Capital budgeting
 

Level of knowledge: Conceptual / Analytical                                                        

Meaning of capital budgeting, Importance, Need, Time value of money, capital budgeting process, project appraisal by using traditional methods and modern methods Practical problems on payback period, rate of return, NPV method , Profitability index, IRR methods

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Dividend policy decisions
 

Level of knowledge: Conceptual/ Analytical                                                                     

Meaning, Kinds, Bonus shares – merits and demerits, theories of dividend decisions, determinants of dividend policy decisions. (Theory only)

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:7
Management of working capital
 

Level of knowledge: Conceptual/ Analytical                                                                     

Meaning of working capital, types of working capital, working capital cycle, adequate working capital, determinants of working capital, estimation of working capital. Management of cash. Management of inventory and debtors – theory only.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Khan, M, Y, & Jain, P, K (2018). Financial Management. Tata Mc Graw Hill
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Chandra, P. (2019).Financial Management. New Delhi, India. Tata McGraw Hill Book Co.
  2. Pandey,I.M.(2015). Financial Management. New Delhi, India. Vikas Publishing House.
  3. Gupta, S, K., Sharma, R.K. & Gupta, N (2013). Financial Management. Kalyani Publishers.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA I 20 Marks  (20% Weightage)

CIA II MSE 50 Marks (25% Weightage)

CIA III 20 Marks (20% Weightage)

ESE 50 Marks (30%)

Attendance 5 Marks (5%)

BBA332 - HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This subject is comprehensive learning on what management is all about and different schools of thoughts on management. It gives a clear understanding of management practices and the various functions of management and also gives away the principles of management developed by eminent management thinkers. The syllabus is structured to provide basic conceptual knowledge on the principles of planning, organizing, staffing, motivation, leadership, controlling and to offer orientation to the recent dynamics of managerial practice.

Course Objectives: 

•To develop understanding of conceptual foundations of HRM

•To understand the processes and practices in HR functions

•To explain important labour laws and its implications 

•To identify contemporary trends and challenges in the field of HRM

 

•To assess the application of appropriate HR intervention in conjunction with organization need. 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: To develop understanding of conceptual foundations of HRM

CO2: To understand the processes and practices in HR functions

CO3: To understand important labor laws and its implications

CO4: To assess the application of appropriate HR intervention in conjunction with organization need.

CO5: To identify contemporary trends and challenges in the field of HRM

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction
 

Concept of HRM, Evolution of HRM, Role of Human Resource Manager, Functions of HRM, HR Structure and Concept of Strategic HRM.        

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Job Analysis and Human Resource Planning
 

Concept of Job Analysis, Importance and Benefits of Job Analysis, Job Analysis Process, Job Description, Job Specification and other Job-related concepts- Job Enrichment, Job Enlargement, Job Rotation, Flexi timing, Telecommuting and Ergonomics.      

Concept & Importance of HRP; Different stages of HR Planning Process; Action Plans in case of shortage and surplus of the workforce.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Recruitment and Selection
 

Concept of Recruitment, Factors affecting Recruitments, Sources of Recruitment; Definition and Importance of Selection, Stages involved in Selection Process, Types of Selection Tests and Types of Interviews. Meaning and Benefits of Induction, Content of an Induction Program. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Learning & Development and Career Mobility
 

Meaning and Importance of Training and Development Programs, Stages involved in Training Process, On-the-Job and Off-the-Job Training & Development Methods. Career Management Process, Models of Career Management, Role & Challenges of Career Development, Career Development Initiatives, Stages in Career Planning, Internal and External Mobility of Employees.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Performance Appraisal & Compensation Management
 

Purpose of Performance Appraisal, Trait, Behavioural and Result Methods of Performance Appraisals, Process of Performance Appraisal, Components of compensation, incentive payments, scope of incentive schemes, types of incentives, group incentives, managing employee benefits and services

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Industrial Relations & Labour laws
 

Meaning of Industrial Relations, Theories of IR, Meaning and Sources of Employee Grievance, Grievance Handling Systems, Meaning & Process of Collective Bargaining, Indiscipline, Settlement Machinery of Industrial Conflicts. Labour laws related to social security measures

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:8
Contemporary issues and trends in HRM
 

Gig workers, Work from home, Ethical Issues in HRM, E-HRM, Introduction to International HRM

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Dessler, G. (2010). Human Resource Management. New Delhi: Prentice Hall.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Armstrong, M. (2010). Handook of HRM Practice. USA: Kogan Page.
  • Basak, S. P. (2012). Human Resource Management: Text & Cases. New Delhi: Pearson 
  • Dessler, G. (2010). Human Resource Management. New Delhi: Prentice Hall.
  • Rao, S. (2010). Essentials of Human Resource Management & Industrial Management: Text & Cases. New Delhi: Himalaya Publication.
  • Robbins, D. A. (2010). Fundamentals of Human Resource Management. New Delhi: Wiley.
Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1

CIA 2 (MID-SEM)

CIA 3

Attendance

20

25 Marks

20

5

BBA333 - MARKETING MANAGEMENT (2020 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Marketing a particularly stimulating subject for learners, since its practical application is visible every day. Old rules of marketing are no longer useful to those who want to influence these new consumer’s choices. This course will lead the exploration of the leading edge of this paradigm shift that is now underway. This course introduces students to the concepts and processes of marketing and takes them deeper into the world of marketing.

Course Objectives: This course intends

•To identify target markets and environments by analysing demographics and consumer behaviour 

•To create a detailed marketing plan and implementation schedule for a company, or critically evaluate existing marketing strategies and tactics.

•To develop a team-prepared written project and they can make a persuasive, effective presentation of their project.

•To develop the strategies used within each of the marketing mixes 

 

•To list best practices for responsible marketing and how to manage marketing efforts 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Students will demonstrate an ability to analyze the situation facing a company and perform tasks in segmentation, targeting, and positioning, and developing a marketing mix.

CO2: Students will demonstrate an ability to analyze the situation facing a company and perform tasks in developing a marketing mix.

CO3: Students will demonstrate an ability to create a detailed marketing plan and implementation schedule for a company

CO4: Students will demonstrate an ability to critically evaluate existing marketing strategies and tactics.

CO5: Students will demonstrate that (a) they can communicate effectively among team members to develop a team-prepared written project and (b) they can make a persuasive, effective presentation of their project

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Introduction to Marketing Fundamentals
 

Meaning Definition marketing, scope of marketing, core marketing concepts, Marketing and Customer Value.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Connecting with Customers
 

Models of Consumer Behavior, characteristics Affecting consumer Behavior, Types of Buying Decision Behavior, The Buyer Decision Process, The Buyer Decision Process for New Products; Business Buyer Behavior, The Business Buyer Decision Process, Institutional and Government Market. Segmentation, targeting and positioning for competitive advantage.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Product Decision
 

Product Levels, Product Characteristics and Classifications, New product development stages, categories of new product, reasons for launching new products and its failure. Product life cycle strategies and its extension, Ansoff’s Matrix, BCG Matrix, meaning of services, unique characteristics of services, 7Ps of service marketing, Service delivery process.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Pricing
 

Types of pricing, Pricing strategies: New product pricing strategies, Product mix pricing strategies, Price adjustment strategies, Price changes, Public policy and pricing.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Distribution Channels
 

Marketing channels, structure, types and criteria of selecting a channel, wholesaling, retailing, and physical distribution.

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
Promotion