Department of SCHOOL OF LAW NCR

Syllabus for
Master of Law (Constitutional and Administrative Law)
Academic Year  (2021)

 
1 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
LLM132CALN COMPARATIVE PUBLIC LAW Core Courses 5 4 100
LLM133CALN FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS AND DIRECTIVE PRINCIPLES Core Courses 5 4 100
LLM134CALN CENTRE-STATE RELATIONS AND CONSTITUTIONAL GOVERNANCE Core Courses 5 4 100
LLM135CALN ADMINISTRATIVE LAW Core Courses 4 3 100
LLM136CALN PUBLIC POLICY AND DEVELOPMENT Core Courses 5 4 100
LLM151CALN FOUNDATION COURSE Core Courses 3 2 100
2 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
LLM231CALN GLOBALIZATION, LAW AND JUSTICE Core Courses 12 4 100
LLM232CALN MEDIA LAW Core Courses 15 4 100
LLM233CALN HEALTH LAW Core Courses 15 4 100
LLM234CALN LOCAL SELF-GOVERNMENT LAW Core Courses 10 4 100
LLM251CALN SEMINAR ON CONTEMPORARY ISSUES Core Courses 6 2 100
LLM252CALN TEACHING PRACTICE Core Courses 1 0 0
LLM281CALN DISSERTATION Core Courses 5 4 100
      

    

Department Overview:

The School of Law, CHRIST (Deemed to be University) (SLCU), is approved by the Bar Council of India to conduct the B.B.A., L.L.B. (Honours) course. The school offers a five-year integrated law program, the successful completion of which will earn the student a B.B.A., L.L.B. degree (Honours) to be awarded by CHRIST (Deemed to be University). In addition to the mandatory courses over the ten semester program, The School of Law, CHRIST (Deemed to be University) has introduced for the benefit of its students numerous other value-added courses and programs aimed at putting the student on par with standard of legal education imparted at the best international universities. In this School of law, knowledge of law is imparted by a teaching - learning process; teaching is supplemented by a variety of skills, such as skills in advocacy, legal writing, research, and management of time. Special emphasis on ethics, life skills and holistic education will empower the students to achieve integrity and look forward to effective contribution to the society.

Mission Statement:

To create and pro actively generate in depth legal knowledge in the student community so that they can transfer their knowledge acquired to the larger benefits of the society in accordance with professional ethics and values.

Introduction to Program:

The Specialization is designed to serve the inquisitive academic minds to take the field to its logical conclusion. Towards this end, it contains various papers including Fundamental Rights and Directive Principles, Centre-State Relations and Constitutional Governance, Administrative Law, Media Law, Health Law, etc

 

 

 

Program Objective:

·      Programme Objectives: 1. To impart knowledge in the specific areas of law in order to gain advanced insight into the subjects. 2. To foster an understanding of the latest legal developments in the area of Constitutional and Administrative law, Corporate and Commercial Law and Intellectual Property and Trade Law. 3. To analyze and evaluate the current legal issues and propose solutions. 4. To prepare them for taking up teaching as a career. 5. To contribute to the society through legal aid and awareness camps. 6. To inculcate Research ethics and also contribute to the holistic development of the students. Programme Outcomes: 1. To demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts, principles, doctrines and theories in their respective specialisations. 2. To enhance their researching skills and aid them to contribute to academic research and publications. 3. To apply the skills of interpretation in advocacy and policy making. 4. To enhance their presentation and teaching abilities. Programme Specific Outcomes: 1. To enable an understanding of the basic concepts and contemporary legal developments in the area of Constitutional and Administrative Law. 2. To enhance advocacy and teaching skills. 3. To assess and contribute to policy making/advocacy through fresh perspectives that arise out of the comparative study of the systems. 4. To develop a sharper academic acumen and will be able to contribute to academic research and publications.

These are the programme Outcomes

 

Articulate thoughts and communicate effectively

·       Practice ethical behavior in all engagements

·       Train leaders in the field of law and policy-making

·       Contribute effectively in research or academia


·        

Assesment Pattern

Continues internal assessments for theory course 50%, end semester examination 50%

Examination And Assesments

Continues internal assessments for theory course 50%, end semester examination 50%

LLM132CALN - COMPARATIVE PUBLIC LAW (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The paper intends to provide a comparative analysis about the structure of government, legislative process and the role of the judiciary to have a better understanding of the Indian polity.

Learning Outcome

1.     Understand the concept of public law and its various branches. Further the students will be provided with information as to how public law differs from private law and how principles of accountability are important in public law.

2.     Distinguish between presidential and parliamentary forms of government including federal and unitary government.

3.     Learn as to how the fundamental rights have evolved overhead a period of time as socio, economic & political necessity in order that people in a given State will lead a peaceful and prosperous life  with others  free from discrimination and exploitation.

4.     Locate and understand the various legislative powers that are vested with the central and state governments under the Indian constitution including the subjects that are listed under schedule 7 as union, state and concurrent list and how the laws can be enacted within their sphere of competence.

5.     To have a comprehensive view of the nature and organisation of the higher judiciary with their roles and limitations under the constitution and also how important the judiciary is in governance perspective

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Growth and nature of public law ? comparative study
 

History and rationale for study of comparative public law -

                            Evolution of public law - ancient to modern - distinguished from Private law

                            Concepts of public law - Rule of law - Separation of powers - Sovereignty  

Accountability and liability of state - transparency - right to information - Sovereign immunity - restorative & compensatory justice

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Models of government ? comparative study
 

Presidential, parliamentary and hybrid systems - distinctive features - comparison and advantages - powers of the president - Prime minister - the parliament - pattern of relationships - Comparative evaluation.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Nature of distribution of powers ? comparative study
 

Federal & Unitary form of state - characteristics, differences & advantages - Distribution of powers - legislative, administrative and financial - Legislative process – executive law making - The amendment process

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Role of Fundamental Rights in public law - comparative study
 

Evolution of fundamental rights- civil rights legislations - equality provisions - approaches to affirmative action.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:16
Judicial organisation and process of judicial review ? comparative study
 

Organisation of the judiciary - issues of judicial independence - appointment - terms of service and removal - Tribunalisation of justice – an evaluation - Ambit of judicial review - Enforcement of fundamental rights - Public interest litigation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

A.V.Dicey, Introduction to the Study of Constitution.

2. Brandt, E.M.; An Introduction to Constitutional Law; Oxford University Press

3. Bernard Schwartz Commentary on American Constitution

4. Bhagwan Vishnoo, Bhushan Vidya, World Constitutions

5. Cane, Peter; Administrative Law; Oxford University Press

6. Dauglus W.O, Studies in Indian and American Constitutional Law.

7. E.S.Venkataramaiah, Federalism Comparative Study

8. Finer, S.E.; Comparative Government; Penguin Books

9. Godfrey and Blondel, The French Constitution and Government.

10. Jain, M.P.; Indian Constitutional Law; LexisNexis

11. K.C.Wheare, Modern Constitutions.

12. Loughlin, Martin; The Idea of Public Law; Oxford University Press

13. Mason and Beany, American Constitutional law

14. Rodney Brazier, Constitutional Practice.

15. Rotunda and Nowak, Treatise on American Constitution.

16. Singh, M. P.; V.N Shukla’s Constitution of India; Eastern Book Company

17. Tom Ginsburg, Rosalind Dixon, Comparative Constitutional Law

18. Elisabeth Zoller, Introduction to Public Law – a Comparative Study, Brill

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

A.V.Dicey, Introduction to the Study of Constitution.

2. Brandt, E.M.; An Introduction to Constitutional Law; Oxford University Press

3. Bernard Schwartz Commentary on American Constitution

4. Bhagwan Vishnoo, Bhushan Vidya, World Constitutions

5. Cane, Peter; Administrative Law; Oxford University Press

6. Dauglus W.O, Studies in Indian and American Constitutional Law.

7. E.S.Venkataramaiah, Federalism Comparative Study

8. Finer, S.E.; Comparative Government; Penguin Books

9. Godfrey and Blondel, The French Constitution and Government.

10. Jain, M.P.; Indian Constitutional Law; LexisNexis

11. K.C.Wheare, Modern Constitutions.

12. Loughlin, Martin; The Idea of Public Law; Oxford University Press

13. Mason and Beany, American Constitutional law

14. Rodney Brazier, Constitutional Practice.

15. Rotunda and Nowak, Treatise on American Constitution.

16. Singh, M. P.; V.N Shukla’s Constitution of India; Eastern Book Company

17. Tom Ginsburg, Rosalind Dixon, Comparative Constitutional Law

18. Elisabeth Zoller, Introduction to Public Law – a Comparative Study, Brill

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

SCHEME OF VALUATION

• CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation – 10%

• CIA II – Mid Semester Examination – 25%

• CIA III – Research Topic – 10%

• Attendance – 05%

• End Semester Examination – 50%

TOTAL 100%

LLM133CALN - FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS AND DIRECTIVE PRINCIPLES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This paper is designed with a view to educate the pupil about the Constitutional rights, duties and policies of the government underlining the relevant legislations which are having wider ramification on the interpretation of the provisions of the Constitution.

Learning Outcome

1.     The course will enable the student to contribute to higher reaches of legal academics and policy making in Constitutional Law - research and teaching. It will equip them to critically analyse constitutional issues.

2.     The student will be able to apply an in depth understanding of fundamental rights jurisprudence to complicated issues in the constitutional courts and contribute to evolving constitutional jurisprudence in India.

3.     The student will be able to appreciate the critical interface between Fundamental Rights and Directive Principles of State policy and apply the rationale to emerging issues and challenges.   

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION
 

UNIT 1:  INTRODUCTION                                                                                  15 Hrs.

Learning Outcome: At the completion of this students will have a basic understanding of Fundamental rights and Directive principles of State Policy, its evolution and impact on the Constitution of other countries. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.1.      Evolution of Fundamental Rights, impact of Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Constitutions of other countries on fundamental rights

1.2.      Concepts of Fundamental Rights, Bill of Rights, Natural rights and Human Rights

1.3.      Preamble of the Constitution and its implication with reference to                                                        Fundamental Rights, Directive Principles of State Policy, and Fundamental Duties

1.4.      Definition of State under Art.12, 13 - Inviolability of Fundamental Rights

1.5.      Doctrine of Waiver, Doctrine of Severability, Doctrine of Eclipse, scope of definition of law under Art.13.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT 2 : RIGHT TO EQUALITY
 

 

                                                                       15 Hrs.

 

2.1.         Relationship between Art 14, 15, 16, 17, and 18

2.2.         Doctrine of Classification, Doctrine of Arbitrariness, Doctrine of Legitimate Expectation, Wends bury Principle

2.3.         Prohibited grounds for discrimination (Art.15); special provisions relating to women; protective discrimination in favor of Backward Classes, Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes; Development of case law

2.4.         Equality of Opportunity in the matters of public employment, reservations in public employment, residence as prerequisite for employment

2.5.         Untouchability, Abolition of Titles

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT 3 :RIGHT TO FREEDOM, RIGHT AGAINST EXPLOITATION
 

UNIT 3 :RIGHT TO FREEDOM, RIGHT AGAINST EXPLOITATION      15 Hrs.

Learning Outcome: This UNIT acquaints the students with fundamental freedoms guaranteed by the Constitution of India.

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.1.         Six fundamental freedoms under Art.19 and reasonable restrictions Art 19 (2) to (6); test to determine the reasonableness of restrictions; whether restriction includes deprivation and prohibition

3.2.         Rights of accused; Doctrine of ex-post -facto law; Doctrine of Double Jeopardy; privilege against self-incrimination.

3.3.         Protection of life and personal liberty; right to education; safeguards against ordinary arrest and preventive detention; right against exploitation.

3.4.         Ambit of religious freedom, cultural and educational rights

3.5.         Right to Constitutional remedies; Fundamental Rights vis-à-vis armed forces.

3.6.         Martial Law and Armed Forces Special Powers Act  

3.7.         Religious and Minority Rights

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:15
UNIT 4 :DIRECTIVE PRINCIPLES OF STATE POLICY AND FUNDAMENTAL DUTIES
 

UNIT 4 :DIRECTIVE PRINCIPLES OF STATE POLICY AND FUNDAMENTAL DUTIES                                                                                                                          15 Hrs.

Learning Outcome: This UNIT enables the students to have an in-depth knowledge on Directive principles of State Policy, Fundamental duties and their inter-relationship.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.1.         Relative importance of Directive Principles of State Policy (DPSP) and Fundamental   Rights

4.2.         Nature of Directive Principles of State Policy, Justifiability of Directive Principles of State Policy

4.3.         Social security and welfare provisions under Directive Principles of State Policy; economic rights

4.4.         Directive Principles of State Policy that were read into Fundamental Rights

4.5.         Fundamental Duties – evolution, relationship between Fundamental Rights and Duties

 

·       The student is expected to read the relevant case law with critical analysis thereof.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     H.M. Seervai, Constitutional Law of India – Vol. I &II

2.     V.N.Shukla , Constitution of India

3.     Subhash C Jain, The Constitution of India

4.     D.D. Basu, Commentaries on Constitutional Law of India, Vol. A to E

5.     M. Hidayatullah (Ed.), Constitution of India

6.     M.P.Jain, Indian Constitutional Law

7.     Subba Rao G C V, Indian Constitutional Law

8.     Pande G S, Constitutional Law of India

9.     Saharay H K, Constitution of India

10.     Pylee M.V, Our Constitution, government & politics

11.     Tope T K, Constitutional Law of India

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     H.M. Seervai, Constitutional Law of India – Vol. I &II

2.     V.N.Shukla , Constitution of India

3.     Subhash C Jain, The Constitution of India

4.     D.D. Basu, Commentaries on Constitutional Law of India, Vol. A to E

5.     M. Hidayatullah (Ed.), Constitution of India

6.     M.P.Jain, Indian Constitutional Law

7.     Subba Rao G C V, Indian Constitutional Law

8.     Pande G S, Constitutional Law of India

9.     Saharay H K, Constitution of India

10.     Pylee M.V, Our Constitution, government & politics

11.     Tope T K, Constitutional Law of India

Evaluation Pattern

SCHEME OF VALUATION

·       CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

·       CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                 – 25%

·       CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

·       Attendance                                                                            – 05%

·       End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

                                                                                                    TOTAL 100%

LLM134CALN - CENTRE-STATE RELATIONS AND CONSTITUTIONAL GOVERNANCE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This paper aims at giving the students an insight into the federal structure as envisaged in the Constitution of India and focuses upon educating them about the Legislative, Administrative and Financial relations between the Centre and the States.

Learning Outcome

On the completion of the course the students will be able to-

1.     Discuss the different forms of government and explain the features and the distinction between them.

2.     Trace the historical background of federalism in India.

3.     To explain the nature of Indian federalism.

4.     To discuss the Legislative relations, Administrative and financial relations between the Centre and the States.

5.     To understand the principles of interpretation of lists.

6.     To discuss the Services under the Union and the States.

7.     To discuss the relations of Centre and the States during emergency.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
UNIT 1: NATURE OF INDIAN POLITY
 

UNIT 1: NATURE OF INDIAN POLITY                                                                       7 Hrs.

Learning Outcome: This UNIT aims at familiarizing the students about the historical background of and the nature of federalism in India.  It also gives an understanding of the different forms of Constitutions. Further, it enables the students to understand the judicial perspective over the Indian federalism.

 

 

                                                              (7 Hrs.)

 

                                                                                                                     

.

1.1.      Introduction to the Constitution of India

1.2.      Constitutional law---Constitutionalism

1.3.      Introduction to the concept of Federalism

1.4.      Historical evolution of federal features in India

1.5.      Different forms of Governments-Unitary, Federal and Confederation, their features, merits, de-merits and distinction between them     

1.6.      Nature of Indian Federalism –Dominant features of the Union over the States

1.7.      Judicial Perspective over the Indian federalism

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
UNIT 2: LEGISLATIVE RELATIONS BETWEEN THE CENTRE AND THE STATES
 

UNIT 2: LEGISLATIVE RELATIONS BETWEEN THE CENTRE AND THE STATES                                                                                                                                            12 Hrs.

Learning Outcome: This UNIT shall give the students an insight into the legislative relations between the Union and   the States.   It shall help the students to understand the principles of interpretation of various lists and the doctrines in relation thereto.

2.1  Doctrine of Territorial Nexus

2.2  Scheme of distribution of legislative powers between Union and States

2.3  Principles of interpretation of lists- Doctrine of Pith and Substance; Doctrine of Colorable Legislation; Doctrine of harmonious construction; Ancillary legislation

2.4  Residuary Powers

2.5  Parliament’s power to legislate on the State List

2.6  Inconsistency between laws passed by Parliament and State legislature

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT 3: ADMINISTRATIVE RELATIONS BETWEEN THE UNION AND STATES
 

UNIT 3: ADMINISTRATIVE RELATIONS   BETWEEN THE UNION AND STATES                                                                                                                                                                 10 Hrs.

Learning Outcome: This UNIT aims at making the students understand the administrative relations between the Centre and States in India.

3.1. Distribution of executive powers

3.2. Inter-governmental delegation of powers

3.3. Centre’s directive to State & other Constitutional provisions

3.4. All India services

3.5. Co-operative federalism; disputes relating to waters, Inter-State Council

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
UNIT 4: FINANCIAL RELATIONS BETWEEN THE UNION AND THE STATES
 

UNIT 4: FINANCIAL RELATIONS BETWEEN THE UNION AND THE STATES 

                                                                                                                                              12 Hrs.

Learning outcome: This UNIT aims to give the students an insight into the financial relations between the Union and the States in India.  The students shall also be introduced to the role of finance commissions in the Centre- State relationship.  Students will also be introduced to the borrowing powers and cooperative federalism.

4.1. Introduction to Allocation of taxing powers-Central taxes, State Taxes, Concurrent Taxes, No tax outside the tax entries

4.2. Funds-Consolidated and Contingency funds

4.3. Public Accounts

4.4. Tax and Fees

4.5. Restrictions on taxing powers

4.6. Inter-Government Tax immunities

4.7. Tax-sharing

4.8. Grants-Grants-in-lieu; Grants-in-aids; Specific Purpose Grants

4.9. Finance Commissions

4.10. Borrowing Powers

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
UNIT 5: FREEDOM OF TRADE, COMMERCE AND INTERCOURSE
 

UNIT 5: FREEDOM OF TRADE, COMMERCE AND INTERCOURSE            6 Hrs.

5.1 Introduction to Freedom of Trade, Commerce and Intercourse

5.2 Regulatory and Compensatory Tax

5.3 Restrictions on Freedom of Trade and Commerce – Parliament’s Power to regulate trade and commerce in public interest; States power to regulate trade and commerce; Savings of existing laws

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
UNIT 6: SERVICES UNDER THE UNION AND THE STATES
 

UNIT 6: SERVICES UNDER THE UNION AND THE STATES                               8 Hrs.

 

Learning Outcome:  This UNIT aims to help the students understand the various                                        provisions in the Constitution with regard to the Services under the Union and the States

6.1  Recruitment and Regulations of Conditions of Services

6.2  Doctrine of Pleasure-Restrictions on Doctrine of Pleasure

6.3  Constitutional Safeguards to Civil Servants

6.4  Public Service commission-Appointment of Member of Public service commission

6.5  Functions of Public Service Commission

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:5
UNIT 7: EMERGENCY PROVISIONS
 

UNIT 7: EMERGENCY PROVISIONS                                                                          5 Hrs.

 

Learning Outcome: This UNIT is aimed at familiarizing the students with the various                                                              emergency provisions in the Constitution of India and the relationship between the

Centre and States during emergency.

 

7.1  National Emergency

7.2  State Emergency

7.3  Financial Emergency

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. A.G. Noorani, (ed.), Centre State Relations in India, Bombay: Lesley Saehney Programme for Training, 1972.
  2. Ashok Chandra, Federalism in India.

3.     De JatindraRanjan, Development of Federalism in India, Gauhati :Bani Prakashani,1974

4.     Desai, Justice D.A. Prasad Anirudh, Centre And State Powers Under Indian Federalism

5.     Dr. Subhash C. Kashyap,  The Framing of India’s Constitution- A study & Constitution making since 1950- An Overview

6.     Dr. Subhash C. Kashyap, Constitution of India: Review and Reassessment

7.     Dr. Subhash C. Kashyap, Indian Constitution-Conflicts and Controversies

8.     Dr. Subhash C. Kashyap, Commentary on Constitution of India

9.     Dr.Subhash C. Kashyap, Our Constitution-An Introduction to India’s Constitution and Constitutional Law, 5th edition reprint 2014.

  1. G.C.V Subbarao, Legislative powers in Indian Constitutional Law.

11.  Glanville Austin, The Indian Constitution: Cornerstone of a nation, Delhi; Oxford University Press.

  1. H.M. Seervai, Constitutional Law of India – Vol.I&II
  2. K.C.Wheare, Federal Government.
  3. K.P. Krishna Shetty, the Law of Union-State Relations and Indian Federalism.

15.  K.Subba Rao, the Indian Federation.

16.  Kabbur, A.S. Centre-State Relations in India, New Delhi: Trust Books, 2004

17.  Keith A.B. , Constitutional History of India

18.  L.M Singhvi, Union-State Relations in India

19.  M.P Jain, Outlines of Indian Legal History.

20.  M.P.Jain, Indian Constitutional Law

21.  M.V Pylee, Constitutional History of India

22.  Monica David, Indian Legal and Constitutional History, 1600-1949, Vimala Publications, 1968.New Delhi: Deep & Deep Publications, 1981

23.  O. P. Sharma, Financial Relations Between Centre & States and Local-Self Governments in India

24.  Pal, Chandra Centre-State Relations and Cooperative Federalism, New Delhi: Deep & Deep Publication, 1983

25.  Pande G S, Constitutional law of India

26.  Prasad, Anirudh Centre-State Relations in India, New Delhi:  Deep & Deep Publications,1985.

27.  Pylee M.V Our Constitution government & politics

28.  Rama Jois M, Legal and Constitutional History of India.

29.  Rama Jois, Services under the States, Indian law Institute, New Delhi

30.  Saharay H K, Constitution of India

31.  Samaraditya Pal,India’s Constitution –origins and evolution (Constituent Assembly debates, Lok Sabha debates on constitutional amendments and Supreme Court judgments,2014

32.  Seetalvad’s  Lectures on Constitutional law

33.  Setalvad M.C, Constitutional History of India

34.  Shubh Narayan Singh, Centre state relations in India: major irritants & post-Sarkaria review

35.  Subba Rao G C V Indian Constitutional law

36.  Subbarao’s Lectures on Constitutional law

37.  Telang’s Lectures on Constitutional Law

38.  Tope T K ,Constitutional law of India by Justice Sujata Manohar, Eastern book company

39.  V.D. Sebastian, Indian Federalism: the Legislative Conflict.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

ARTICLES:

 

1.     Federalism In India, Benjamin N. Schoenfeld, Http://Www.Jstor.Org/Stable/42743497

2.     Federalism : A Conceptual Analysis,  S. A. Paleker,  The Indian Journal Of Political Science, Vol. 67, No. 2 (Apr.- June, 2006), Pp. 303-310,  Indian Political Science Association, Http://Www.Jstor.Org/Stable/41856217

3.     United In Diversity? Asymmetry In Indian Federalism,Louise Tillin, Http://Www.Jstor.Org/Stable/4624781

4.     Coalition Government And Federal System In India, M.G. Khan Http://Www.Jstor.Org/Stable/41855780

5.     The Nature Of Indian Federalism: A Critique, H. M. Rajashekara,Http://Www.Jstor.Org/Stable/2645661

6.     The Indian Union And Emergency Powers, Krishna K. Tummala, Http://Www.Jstor.Org/Stable/1601275

7.     Finance Commission In A Federal Set-Up,Vinod Vyasulu,  Http://Www.Jstor.Org/Stable/4404650

8.     Dr. B. R. Ambedkar And Making Of The Constitution: A Case Study Of Indian Federalism, K. H. Cheluva Raju,Http://Www.Jstor.Org/Stable/41855548

9.     Ramaswamy R. Iyer, Inter-State Water Disputes Act 1956: Difficulties And Solutions, Http://Www.Jstor.Org/Stable/4412360

10.  Federalism And Water Resources, Ramaswamy R. Iyer,Http://Www.Jstor.Org/Stable/4400999

11.  Ga.Akerlof,Centre-Statefiscalrelations In India -Www.Jstor.Org/Stable/29794022

12.  H. M. Rajasekhara, The Nature Of Indian Federalism: A Critique -Www.Jstor.Org/Stable/2645661

13.  Balveer Arora, India’s Experience With Federalism: Lessons Learnt And Unlearnt, Www.Uni-Bielefeld.De/Midea/Pdf/Balveer.Pdf

Evaluation Pattern

SCHEME OF VALUATION

·       CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

·       CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                 – 25%

·       CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

·       Attendance                                                                            – 05%

·       End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

                                                                                                    TOTAL 100%

LLM135CALN - ADMINISTRATIVE LAW (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The objective of studying of Administrative law is to understand
nature of the administration and the role of law. Earlier, the
functions of the state were so defused and were dealing with sporadic issues such as policing and protection from external aggression.
There is a sea change in the philosophy of governance of the state and
there is a paradigm shift from laissez faire to welfare state. The
welfare state is now to show concern for every issue of the subjects
almost from cradle to grave. It proliferates into every aspect of life.
The three wings of the state established under the Constitution
functions to ensure welfare of the subjects. There is an unprecedented
rise in state intervention in an individual’s (whether citizen or noncitizen)
life. The Executive play a vital role in administration of state.
It is to execute the decisions of the other two wings of the state
besides functioning independently. Therefore, the functions of it have
increased manifold and continue to increase further. Thus, there has
been increase in scope for accumulation of power and functions
which has the tendency to corrupt. On the other hand, the legislature
functions only for a limited period. It has limited its role to perform
formative role and delegate rule making power to the executive.
Further, the executive is to play the role of the judiciary inter alia due
to piling up of cases and technically different matters paving the way
for constitution of special judicial cum administrative bodies called
Tribunals. Thus, there is manifold increase in the affairs of the
executive and the scope for arbitrary and whimsical exercise of
power. But, equally significant is the role of the ensuring
administration of justice even in the parallel systems being developed
in the form of administration besides the traditional institutions. In
this scenario, to ensure the effective functioning of the wings of the
state and other instrumentalities of the executive within the umbrella
of the Constitution there has been evolution of the subject of study
namely, the Administrative Law.
Therefore, administrative law has evolved into a separate branch of
law taking into its fold complex and intricate issues and exercise of
fundamental principles of law and justice. Its rapid growth in the
20th century is regarded as the most significant development in the
field of law. It deals with the adjective form of the legal framework
governing public administration and the principles to control
executive power to avoid arbitrariness.

Learning Outcome

After completion of the course the students will be able to:
1. Explain the nature, scope, necessity and development of Administrative
Law and action;
2. Identify distinction between the Constitutional Law and Administrative Law;

3. Identify the basic rules and principles followed to render
administrative justice;
4. Examine the reasons and evolution of delegated legislation and the
functioning of the delegated authorities within the ambit of the
power conferred;
5. Examine the functioning of the special bodies constituted as
alternative means for administering justice viz., Administrative
Tribunals, Ombudsman, Lokayukta, Lokpal;
6. Analyse the remedies available against administrative actions;
7. Analyze the working of administration vis-a-vis rights of citizens.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
FUNDAMENTALS OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW
 

1.1.      Evolution, definition, nature, scope and significance of Administrative Law in various system of governance from ancient to modern.   Development of Administrative law in USA, UK and India, and Droit Administratiff and Conseild’etatin France.

1.2.      Constitutional dimensions of administrative law and its relationship, Role of administrative law in welfare state and relationship between constitutional and administrative law.

1.3.      Rule of law and separation of powers.

1.4.      Classification of power, delegation of legislative power and control.

1.5.      Read Light theory, Green Light theory and Amber light theory.

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
PROCEDURAL FAIRNESS AND ADMINISTRATIVE DISCRETIONARY POWER
 

2.1.         Evolution and significance of principle of Natural justice

2.2.         Right to fair hearing – Audi Alterampartem – Administrative cases – statutory hearing- reasoned decision and its exceptions .:          nemojudex in causa sua -Rule against bias , Kinds of bias and exceptions

2.3.         Administrative Discretionary power – definition, its scope, nature and relevance in the present day context, with the support of right to information Act, 2005.use, misuse, abuse and non-use of discretionary power.

2.4.         Judicial control over Administrative Discretionary power – Retention, Dictation and Abuse of Administrative power.

2.5.         Ombudsman Lokpal and Lokayukta

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
JUDICIAL REVIEW OF ADMINISTRATIVE ACTION
 

3.1.         Nature extent and limitation of Administrative action in India. Judicial control over Administrative action- remedies for Administrative wrongs, Writs Remedies.

3.2.         Limits of Judicial review-Locus standi and PIL- Laches-Resjudicata and Doctrine of exhaustion of alternative remedies – Doctrine of Standing and Doctrine of Ripeness

3.3.         Statutory Remedies – General and Specific statutory remedies for administrative action.

3.4.         Administrative process- judicial control- Liabilities and   accountabilities of the states- Administrative Tribunals

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
GOVERNMENTAL PRIVILEGE, OFFICIAL SECRECY AND ACCESS TO INFORMATION
 

1.1.      Governmental Privileges- withholding of documents and evidence-Official Secrets Act,1923. Rebuttal of governmental privileges

1.2.      Governmental Privileges position in England and India. Right to Information Act, 2005, 2019 amendment to RTI Act.

1.3.      Doctrine of Legitimate Expectation and its constitutional dimensions and limitations. Public utility services.

1.4.      Nature and Extent of Doctrine of proportionality and wednesburyprinciple.

1.5.      Doctrine of Public Accountability.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
PROTECTIONS OF CIVIL SERVANT, ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDICATION AND PUBLIC UNDERTAKINGS AND CORPORATIONS
 

5.1.      Constitutional protection of civil servants, need for protection of civil servants. Lacunae in the protection.

5.2.      Terms and condition of service, tenure of office – the doctrine of pleasure its extent and limitations and exceptions, Administrative Adjudication –Exclusion clause and Administrative Tribunals and Special Court Act – 1979.

5.3.      Nature, Constitution and powers of Public Undertakings and control over them. 

5.4.      Privatization of public corporations and its impact in India on concept of state.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.       Basu, Durga Das, Administrative Law.

2.       De Smith - Judicial Review of Administrative Action, 6th Revised Edition 2006, Sweet and Maxwell Publication.

3.       Garner’s – Administrative Law, 8th Edition 1996, Oxford University press

4.       H.W.R. Wade and C.F. Forsyth - Administrative Law, 10th Edition 2009, Publication-Oxford University Press,New York.

5.       I. P. Massey - Administrative Law, 7th Edition 2008. Publication-Eastern Book Company, Luck now.

6.       Jain, M.P., Cases and Materials on Indian Administrative Law, Nagpur: Lexis Nexis, India.

7.       M. P. Jain & S. N. Jain, Principles of Administrative Law, Nagpur: Lexis Nexis, India, 2010.

8.       Richard J Pierce & Kenneth Culp Davis, Administrative Law treatise

9.       S. P. Sathe - Administrative Law, 7th Edition 2006. Lexis Nexis, Butterworth’s Publication.

10.    Subba Rao, G C V, Administrative law

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.     Ajoy P.B., Administrative Action and the Doctrine of Proportionality in India, http://www.iosrjournals.org/iosr-jhss/papers/Vol1-issue6/D0161623.pdf

2.     Justice MarkandeyKatju., Administrative law and judicial review of administrative action, http://www.ebcindia.com/lawyer/articles/2005_8_25.htm

3.     Anupa V. Thapliyal, Central Administrative Tribunals and Their Power to Issue Directions, Orders or Writs Under Articles 226 and 227 of the Constitution, http://www.ebc-india.com/lawyer/articles/92v4a4.htm

4.     ShubhamManojKhare, Administrative Discretion & Limitation on Administrative Discretion By Article 14 & 16 of the Indian Constitution, http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1465519

5.     D.Y.Chandrachud,Constitutional and Administrative Law in India, http://scholarship.law.cornell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1142&context=ijli

6.     Prof. S.S. Vishweshwaraiah, Emerging Trends In Administrative Law, http://elearning.vtu.ac.in/P3/CIP71/5.pdf

7.     A. T. Markose, ‘Judicial Control of Administrative Action in India. A Study in Methods.’http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/1337434.pdf?acceptTC=true

8.     Y Pardhasaradhi, Ravinder Kaur, Administrative Reforms for Good Governance, http://socialsciences.in/article/administrative-reforms-good-governance

9.     162nd Report of the Law Commission on Central Administrative Tribunal, http://lawcommissionofindia.nic.in/101-169/report162.pdf

 

Evaluation Pattern

SCHEME OF VALUATION

       CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

       CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                 – 25%

       CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

       Attendance                                                                            – 05%

       End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

                                                                                                TOTAL 100%

LLM136CALN - PUBLIC POLICY AND DEVELOPMENT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Public policy and development acquaints students with the actors, institutions, and processes of public policy-making in India. It will also help students to develop the analytical tools necessary to think critically about matters associated with the making and implementation of Indian public policy.

Learning Outcome

 

At the end of the course students will be able to -

 

1.      To learn the nature and scope of concept of public policy and development.

 

2.      To learn the nature and scope of health care policy.

 

3.      To learn the nature and scope application of energy and environment policy.

 

4.      To learn the nature and scope of education policy in India.

 

5.      To learn the ambit and extent of application of economic and industrial policy.

 

 

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
NATURE AND EXTENT OF PUBLIC POLICY
 

 Learning outcome: On completion of this UNIT, the students are expected to learn the nature and scope of concept of public policy and development.

 

1.1.       Significance of policy making & implications on society

 

1.2.       Policy making process – formulation, adoption implementation and evaluation, Indicators for determining Issues (how widespread a problem, How troublesome, How long a problem, Costliness of the problem, What if the issue is kept off  Public agenda) formulation, adoption implementation and evaluation- [Does the Policy make sense(Quantitative approach and qualitative approach)]

 

1.3.       Policy Advocacy- Surveying Policy making Landscape(Public officials, Mass Media, Interest Groups, Political Parties, Bureaucracy, Citizens as Individuals and in Small groups, Agenda building In Perspective)

 

1.4.       Goals underlying policy making - Equity, Efficiency, Welfare, Liberty and SecurityMeans and methods of implementation-( Executive as Implementation Agents, Requirements for Implementation, Conditions for discouraging Implementation, Bureaucrats as Public Policy makers)

 

1.5.       Domestic Policy v Foreign Policy

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
HEALTH CARE POLICY
 

 Learning outcome: On completion of this UNIT, the students are expected to learn the nature and scope of health care policy.

 

2.1 Public Health Policy – Constitutional and statutory basis

 

2.2. Coverage of policy – Universal or selective

 

2.3. Medicare and Medicaid

 

2.4. Law and public health policy

 

2.5. Policy reform and evaluation

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY
 

Learning outcome: On completion of this UNIT, the students are expected to learn the nature and scope application of energy and environment policy.

3.1.Energy Policy – formulation and implementation

 

3.2. Energy crisis and protection of Natural resources

 

3.3. Environmental Policy – Elements, Concept of Development Sustainable development, Brundtland Report on Sustainable Development, Policy Initiatives of the State for development-Urban/Rural Development-73 and 74 Constitutional Amendments.

 

3.4. Normative structure of environmental policy

 

3.5. Institutional functions of implementation of Environment policy

 

 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
EDUCATION POLICY
 

 Learning outcome: On completion of this UNIT, the students are expected to learn the nature and scope of education policy in India.

 

4.1 Elements of Education Policy 

 

4.2. Right to education – scope and content

 

4.3. Adult education and women’s education

 

4.4. The Right to Education Act – An Appraisal

 

4.5. Commercialization of education: causes and consequences

 

 

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
ECONOMIC AND INDUSTRIAL POLICY
 

 Learning outcome: On completion of this UNIT, the students are expected to learn the ambit and extent of application of economic and industrial policy.

 

5.1 Globalization and economic policy

 

5.2. Globalization and industrial policy

 

5.3. International Trade Policies and their impact on domestic policies

 

5.4. Legislative response to economic and trade policy

 

5.5. Judicial role in evaluation of economic and industrial policies.

 

5.6. Foreign Direct Investment Policy

 

5.7. Information Technology Policy

 


Text Books And Reference Books:

 

 Deborah Stone, Policy Paradox, The Art of Political Decision Making

 

2.      J.E. Anderson, Public Policy  Making, Boston Houghton Miffin1990

 

3.      Michael E. Craft and Scott. R. Furlong., “ Public Policy – Politics analysis and alternatives”

 

4.      P.H. Applebey, Policy& Administration, Alabama Univ.Press1957

 

5.      Pankaja  P B, Industrial Policies in India, CLJ

 

6.      R.K. Sapru, Public Policy, Delhi Sterling 1994

 

7.      S.S. Nagel, Policy Theory and Policy Evaluation, Concepts Knowledge, Causes & Norms, Delhi, Greenwood Press 1990

 

8.      T.D. Dror, Understanding Public Policy Englewood’s Cliffs NJ Prentice hall,1984

 

9.      W. Dunn, Public Policy Analysis: An Introduction, Englewood’s Cliffs NJ Prentice hall, 1984

 

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 

1.      Deborah Stone, Policy Paradox, The Art of Political Decision Making

 

2.      J.E. Anderson, Public Policy  Making, Boston Houghton Miffin1990

 

3.      Michael E. Craft and Scott. R. Furlong., “ Public Policy – Politics analysis and alternatives”

 

4.      P.H. Applebey, Policy& Administration, Alabama Univ.Press1957

 

5.      Pankaja  P B, Industrial Policies in India, CLJ

 

6.      R.K. Sapru, Public Policy, Delhi Sterling 1994

 

7.      S.S. Nagel, Policy Theory and Policy Evaluation, Concepts Knowledge, Causes & Norms, Delhi, Greenwood Press 1990

 

8.      T.D. Dror, Understanding Public Policy Englewood’s Cliffs NJ Prentice hall,1984

 

9.      W. Dunn, Public Policy Analysis: An Introduction, Englewood’s Cliffs NJ Prentice hall, 1984

 

Evaluation Pattern

 

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

 

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                  – 25%

 

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

 

·         Attendance                                                                            – 05%

 

·         End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

 

                                                                                                TOTAL 100%

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

 

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                  – 25%

 

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

 

·         Attendance                                                                            – 05%

 

·         End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

 

                                                                                                TOTAL 100%

 

LLM151CALN - FOUNDATION COURSE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

About Jurisprudence theories, schools and views of different thinkers

Learning Outcome

Knowledge about theories and thinkers viewpoints

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
UNIT I: INTRODUCTION TO JURISPRUDENCE
 

 

UNIT I: INTRODUCTION TO JURISPRUDENCE                                                    9 Hrs

1.1         Nature of Jurisprudence

1.2         Schools of Jurisprudence-Natural law, Positivism, Pure science of law, Historical, Sociological, Realism, teleological school

1.3         Evolution and definition of law

1.4          Sources of Law

1.5         The Technique of the law-Classification, Titles, Acts, Events

1.6         Public Law-Law and the State, Criminal law

1.7         The concept of Legal Personality

1.8         Rights  and Duties

1.9         The Concept of Property

1.10      Possession and Ownership

1.11      Law of Procedure

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
UNIT 2: THE CONCEPT OF LAW-H.L. A. HART
 

UNIT 2:   THE CONCEPT OF LAW-H.L. A. HART                                                     8 Hrs

2.1  Laws, commands and Orders

2.2  The variety of Laws

2.3  Sovereign and subject

2.4  Law as the Union of Primary and Secondary Rules

2.5  The foundations of a Legal system

2.6  Formalism and Rule Skepticism

2.7  Justice and Morality

2.8  International Law

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
UNIT 3: TAKING RIGHTS SERIOUSLY-RONALD DWORKIN
 

UNIT 3: TAKING RIGHTS SERIOUSLY-RONALD DWORKIN                                    7 Hrs

3.1  Introduction

3.2  Model Rules I and II

3.3  Hard cases, Constitutional Case

3.4   Justice and Rights

3.5  Taking Rights seriously

3.6  Civil Disobedience

3.7  Reverse discrimination

3.8  Liberty and Moralism; Liberty and Liberalism

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:7
UNIT 4: NATURE OF JUDICIAL PROCESS-BENJAMIN CARDOZA
 

UNIT 4: NATURE OF JUDICIAL PROCESS-BENJAMIN CARDOZA               7 Hrs

4.1  Introduction-The Method of Philosophy

4.2  The Methods of History, Tradition and Sociology

4.3  The Method of Sociology, The Judge as a Legislator

4.4  Adherence to Precedent- The Subconscious element in the Judicial Process

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
UNIT 5: PRECEDENT IN ENGLISH LAW-RUPERT CROSS
 

UNIT 5: PRECEDENT IN ENGLISH LAW-RUPERT CROSS                                    7 Hrs

5.1  The English Doctrine of Precedent

5.2  Ratio Decendi and Obiter Dictum

5.3  Stare decisis and exceptions to stare decisis

5.4  Precedent as a source of law; Precedent and Judicial Reasoning; Precedent and legal theory

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:3
UNIT 6: LAW AND ECONOMICS
 

UNIT 6: LAW AND ECONOMICS                                                                                 3 Hrs

6.1  Basics of Law and economics

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 7: SOFT SKILLS
 

UNIT 7: SOFT SKILLS                                                                                                      2 Hrs

7.1  Public speaking

7.2  Communication skills-Reading and writing

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:2
UNIT 8: INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL RESEARCH
 

UNIT 8: INTRODUCTION TO LEGAL RESEARCH                                                 2 Hrs

8.1Basics of legal research

Text Books And Reference Books:

Books and Articles

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Books and Articles

Evaluation Pattern

Exam will be conducted at the end of the course

LLM231CALN - GLOBALIZATION, LAW AND JUSTICE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:12
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

It is said that we are now living in a global neighborhood, which is not yet global village.  This is the result of the so called “globalization” which refers to those processes that tend to create and consolidate a unified economy, a single ecological system, and a complex network of communications that covers the whole globe, even if it doesnot penetrate into every part of it.  We find in every discipline studies under the titles global, globalism and globalization but not much in the discipline of law and now it is entering it also.  The process of globalization has its own impact on every discipline and this paper or course intends to study its influence on the discipline of law. The purpose is to sensitize students of law about implications of the process of globalization on basic principles, concepts and ideas underlying the discipline of law. To name a few the concept of law itself, justice, human rights and legal process.  The thrust is to analyze and evaluate them from a global perspective. 

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course the students will be able to:

 

·         Identify and explain the nature of globalisation and its impact on the developments of law and legal theory;

·         Analyse the various issues like human rights, sovereignty of nation-state, legitimacy of international law in the wake of globalisation; and

·         Develop a critical understanding about globalisationvis-a-vis various global issues as well as various theories of justice.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
GLOBALIZATION: PROCESS AND ITS EFFECTS
 

1.1.Concept of Liberalization, Privatization, Globalization, Meaning and definition of globalization, nature, scope and limits of globalization,   Different kinds.

1.2.History and evolution of globalization.

1.3.Causes and consequence of globalization, effect of globalization on economic, social, cultural and political aspects of life in twenty-first century.

1.4.Effect of globalization on law and justice-an introduction

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
GLOBALIZATION AND LEGAL THEORY
 

21.Globalization and legal theory, the need for the study of concept of law from a global perspective.

2.2   Basic concepts of law in western legal thought.  A brief analysis of positivist, normative and   realist theories of law in western tradition.

2.3. The concept of justice and its relation to law in Western and Indian Legal thought and    concept of Dharma as a legal tradition.  The relation between law and justice.

2.4. Normative Jurisprudence, the western heritage, classical utilitarianism, Benthamite and modified Benthamite utilitarianism.

2.5. Theories of Justice Rawls and Pogge.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
POLICY ISSUES
 

3.1 Globalization and Democracy

3.2. Rule of Law-economic development-political development

3.3. Globalization and Justice

3.4. Globalization and Security

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE CONTEXT OF GLOBALIZATION
 

4.1 Human rights theory: Five Perspectives

4.2. Human Rights law as universal-criticism and rhetoric or Rights

4.3. Human Rights and the challenges-pluralist theories and Sen’s challenge

4.4. Human Rights and Southern voice-UpendraBaxi.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
HARMONIZATION OF LAW
 

5.1 Public and Private International Law governance

5.2. Regulation of International banks and money laundering

5.3. Harmonization of private commercial law-lexmercatoria

5.4. Harmonization of Intellectual Property law

5.5. Jurisdictional Issues in the era of globalization.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Jan AartScholte, Globalization – A critical introduction

2.      Jarrod Wiener – Globalization and the harmonization of law

3.      Michael Goodhart – Democracy as Human Rights – Freedom  and Equality in the age of Globalization

4.      James H Mitelman, The Globalization Syndrome

5.      Manfred B. Steger, Globalization –A very Short introduction-Oxford introductory series.

6.      Thomas Fleiner&Lidija R. BastaFleiner, Constitutional democracy in a multicultural and globalised world, Springer.

7.      William Twining, General Jurisprudence; Understanding Law from a Legal perspective, Cambridge, Cambridge University, 2009

8.      William Twining, Globalization and Legal Theory, New York: Butterworths, 2006.

9.      Boaventura d Sousa Santos, Towards a New Legal Common Sense: Law, Globalization and Emanicipation, London: Butterworths, 2002.

10.  Otto A Bird, The Idea of Justice, New York: Frederick A Praeger, 1968

11.  M.D.A. Freeman, Lloyd’s Introduction to Jurisprudence, London: Sweet and Maxwell, 2010

12.  AmartyaSen, The idea of Justice, New Delhi: Allen Lane, 2009.

13.  UpendraBaxi, The Future of Human Rights, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2006.

14.  Thomas Pogge, Global Justice, Oxford: Blackwell, 2001

15.  B.S. Santos and Cesar A. Rodriquez-Gravito (ed.,) Law and Globalization from below: Towards a Cosmopolitan Legality, New York Cambridge University Press, 2005.  

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Jan AartScholte, Globalization – A critical introduction

2.      Jarrod Wiener – Globalization and the harmonization of law

3.      Michael Goodhart – Democracy as Human Rights – Freedom  and Equality in the age of Globalization

4.      James H Mitelman, The Globalization Syndrome

5.      Manfred B. Steger, Globalization –A very Short introduction-Oxford introductory series.

6.      Thomas Fleiner&Lidija R. BastaFleiner, Constitutional democracy in a multicultural and globalised world, Springer.

7.      William Twining, General Jurisprudence; Understanding Law from a Legal perspective, Cambridge, Cambridge University, 2009

8.      William Twining, Globalization and Legal Theory, New York: Butterworths, 2006.

9.      Boaventura d Sousa Santos, Towards a New Legal Common Sense: Law, Globalization and Emanicipation, London: Butterworths, 2002.

10.  Otto A Bird, The Idea of Justice, New York: Frederick A Praeger, 1968

11.  M.D.A. Freeman, Lloyd’s Introduction to Jurisprudence, London: Sweet and Maxwell, 2010

12.  AmartyaSen, The idea of Justice, New Delhi: Allen Lane, 2009.

13.  UpendraBaxi, The Future of Human Rights, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2006.

14.  Thomas Pogge, Global Justice, Oxford: Blackwell, 2001

15.  B.S. Santos and Cesar A. Rodriquez-Gravito (ed.,) Law and Globalization from below: Towards a Cosmopolitan Legality, New York Cambridge University Press, 2005.  

Evaluation Pattern

 

·    CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                  – 25%

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

·         Attendance                                                                            – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

LLM232CALN - MEDIA LAW (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:15
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Mass communication from the days of printing press has played a very important role in the formation of the public opinion. Advancement in science and technology has changed the scope and dimensions of mass communication. ICT has created digital era for us. While there are definite benefits from these technologies, experience shows that these technologies can be abused to harm the interests of the society. The course aims to provide basic understating of the evolution of mass media and its regulation.

Learning Outcome

On completion of this course the students will be able:

1.      To discuss and analyze the legal, ethical and regulatory framework governing Media in India.

2.      To trace the historical background to the freedom of Press in India.

3.      To discuss and analyze the Constitutional framework in relation to freedom of speech and expression, freedom of Press, Right to Privacy.

4.      To analyze and evaluate the latest developments and issues in the field of Media Law.

5.      To analyze the principles laid down in the judgments of the courts.

6.      To explain and discuss the importance and necessity of media ethics and journalistic integrity.

7.      Apply the concepts to legal problems.

8.      Devise a correct way to handle the legal problems.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
FREEDOM OF SPEECH AND EXPRESSION
 

1.1.           Learning Outcome: At the end of this UNIT students will be able to appreciate the Philosophical justification for the protection of Free speech right.  Further students will be familiarized with freedom of media and allied aspects.

 

 

Freedom of speech as a human right – Philosophical justification for the protection of Free speech right – Constitutional guarantee for Free Press – reasonable restrictions on Free speech

1.2.            Media Freedom – boundaries of a free press - Mass media –press, films, radio, television – ownership  patterns – legal issues; Freedom of Information v Free Speech

1.3.            Origins of broadcasting – regulation of press and broadcasting  – censorship of broadcasting media and press – leading cases – Evolution of television as a visual media

1.4.            Impact of films as visual media – censorship of films – judicial view on film censorship – standards of censorship,Role of media in law making process.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
PROTECTION OF REPUTATION
 

Learning Outcome: At the end of this UNIT the student will be familiar with the fundamental aspects of protection of reputation.

2.1.            Defamation – overview – general framework for defamation law- role of malice – IPC provisions – remedies and damages

2.2.            Decent speech – indecent speech – hate speech – racial speech – obscenity on mass media – regulation and control

2.3.            Libel in press –regulation and control – Slander through Broadcasting audio-video defamation

2.4.            Internet as a platform of free speech – regulation of content on Internet  self-regulation v Government regulation

2.5.            Libel and slander in cyberspace – cross border libel/slander – jurisdictional problems – Gutnick v John Doe

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
MEDIA AND PRIVACY
 

Learning Outcome: At the end of this UNIT students would be in a position to appreciate the interface between the freedom of media and privacy rights

3.1.            Obscenity and pornography  – historical background  - Hicklin  Test – contemporary standards in Miller   v California - Child pornography

3.2.            Blasphemy – historical overview- censorship of stage productions – violence - legal regulation of blasphemy

3.3.            Privacy – historical development of private and confidential information – media practices and human rights – photo journalism in public places – child right to privacy 

3.4.            Information privacy and reputation -  personal data protection – abuse of personal information – marketing of personal information- internet privacy

3.5.            Press and Public access to the judicial processes , records, places and meetings – Right to Information Act

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
MEDIA, ETHICS AND ADJUDICATION
 

Learning Outcome: This UNIT enables the students to understand the requisite conceptual as well as statutory provisions pertaining to media, ethics and adjudication.

4.1.            Copyright issues in mass media – protection for copyrighted work – plagiarism –  pirated music -  remedies for infringement

4.2.            Media and Courts - Report of legal proceedings – trail by media –  sensitive court  reporting  and  human rights contempt of court – procedure and punishment

4.3.            Corporate and commercial speech – development of commercial speech doctrine – commercial speech for professionals and corporations – Art.19(1)(a) protection  for unsolicited mail advertising – regulation of commercial speech

4.4.            Ethical dilemmas, issues and concerns in mass communication – foundation of ethics- different aspects of journalism’s ethical issues- Reporters privileges and protection of media sources

4.5.            Extra- judicial regulation of media content – press complaints and editors’ code of practice –Broadcasting standards commission – codes for advertisement standards – Film censorship board – ICANN

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Ursula Smartt, Media and Entertainment Law, Routledge

2.      Roy L Moore, Mass communication Law and Ethics

3.      Perry Keller, European and International Media Law, Oxford

4.      Sallie Spilsbury, Media Law, Cavendish

5.      Frank Leishmann, Policing and the Media, Lawman

6.      Roger L Sadler, Electronic Media Law, Sage

7.      Sebastian Paul, Forbidden Zones; law and media

8.      Jaya Patil, Mass media: support for rural development

9.      Wayne Overbeck, Major principles of media law.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Ursula Smartt, Media and Entertainment Law, Routledge

2.      Roy L Moore, Mass communication Law and Ethics

3.      Perry Keller, European and International Media Law, Oxford

4.      Sallie Spilsbury, Media Law, Cavendish

5.      Frank Leishmann, Policing and the Media, Lawman

6.      Roger L Sadler, Electronic Media Law, Sage

7.      Sebastian Paul, Forbidden Zones; law and media

8.      Jaya Patil, Mass media: support for rural development

9.      Wayne Overbeck, Major principles of media law.

Evaluation Pattern

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                  – 25%

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

·         Attendance                                                                            – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

                                                                                                TOTAL 100%

LLM233CALN - HEALTH LAW (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:15
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The   matters   relating   to   medicine   and   health   are   as   ancient   as human   civilization   itself,   giving   rise   to   many   legal   and   moral issues   of   varying   degree   at   different   stages   of   advancement   in the   sphere   of   medical   science.    The   advancement   in   the   field   of medical   technology,   though   a   boon   to   the   mankind,   has   its own flip   side.   The   invention   of   pre-natal   diagnostic   techniques, transplantation   of   human   organs,   assisted   reproduction techniques   and   other   medical   procedures   have   forced   new   legal challenges.   Medicine   and   health   are   inter-related   aspects. Administration   of   treatment   is   a   joint   endeavour   of   doctors, para-medical   staff,   state   and   private   agencies,   which   calls   for effective   legal   control   to   protect   the   interest   of   medical   and para-medical   professionals   as   well   as   the   patients.  In the light of the above the course is designed and divided into six units and the description of each unit in brief is as follows:

Unit 1 deals with concept of right to health and interrelationship between law and medicine and various issues connected to it.

Unit 2 focuses on the legal framework relating to medicine and health.

Unit 3 describes the legal framework relating to Drugs and Cosmetics.

Unit 4 discusses the laws relating to reproductive health.

Unit 5 explains the right to health of special categories of people, mental health and laws pertaining to it.

 

Unit 6 explains and examines the modern development relating to health law.

Learning Outcome

The objectives of the course are as follows –

 

  1. To impart the students with the knowledge of the relation between law and medicine and right to health

  2. To provide an understanding of legal framework relating to medicine and health

  3. To provide an understanding of  Drugs and Cosmetics Act and Product Liability

  4. To explain the law relating to reproductive health and ‘right’ issue connected to it

  5. To discuss rights of special (disability) categories of people; and Mental health and the law pertaining to it

  6. To discuss and analyse the areas of developments in medicine with reference to health, like stem cell research, transplantation of human organs

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
HEALTH LAW: An Introduction
 

 

  1. Health Law – Meaning and scope;

  2. Interplay between Law and Medicine;

  3. Right to health and its enforcement, WHO & international conventions on health laws;

  4. Health care administration in India;

  5. Globalization and the changing dimensions of health laws;

  6. Climate change and health; 

  7. Forensic medicine – the significance of forensic medicine; 

  8. Hippocratic Oath

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
LEGAL REGIME FOR HEALTH AND MEDICINE
 

Policy framework for the right to health;

2.2. NRHM, Universal health insurance scheme;

2.3. The National Medical Commission Act, 2019; 

2.4. Dentists Act, 1948 – Medical Degrees Act, 1916;

2.5. Clinical Establishments (Registration & Regulation) Act, 2010; 

2.6. The Indian Medicine Central Council Act, 1970

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
DRUGS AND COSMETICS
 

3.1 Legal control of drugs and cosmetics;

3.2. Drugs and Cosmetics Act and Rules;

 

3.3. Product liability for defective medicine, contractual liability, tortuous liability, liabilities under the English and Indian Consumer Protection Acts, English Medicines Act. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH
 

Right to Reproductive health – Constitutional and Legal issues; 

4.2 The Medical Termination of Pregnancy Act, 1971; Medical Termination of Pregnancy Rules, 2003; Medial Termination of Pregnancy Regulations 2003; 

 

4.3 Pre-Conception and Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques (Prohibition of Sex Selection) Act, 1994; Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques (Regulation & Prevention of Misuse) Rules 1990.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
LEGAL FRAMEWORK RELATING TO HEALTH OF SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF PEOPLE
 

5.1. Disabled people: Locomotor disability, hearing impaired, visually impaired, aged people, people suffering from infectious diseases e.g. HIV/ AIDS; Swine flu etc. 

5.2. People suffering from occupational diseases, People subjected to Clinical trial.

 

5.3. Legal protection of mentally ill persons with special reference to Mental Health Act

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
CONTEMPORARY DEVELOPMENTS
 

6.1. Therapeutic and non-therapeutic research;

6.2. Stem cell research;

6.3. Transplantation of Human Organs and Tissues Act, 1994; Transplantation of Human Organs Rules, 1995;

6.4. Bio-ethics; Medical ethics;

 

6.5. Liability of Doctors for negligence;

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.     

  1. Cameron, Cecily, and Elizabeth-Anne Gumbel. Clinical Negligence: A Practitioner's Handbook. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Print.

  2. Chaudhri, V. K. Medical Jurisprudence and Toxicology. Allahabad: Dwivedi Law Agency, 2007.

  3. Dogra, T. D., and Rudra, AbhijitLyon's Medical Jurisprudence and Toxicology. New Delhi: Delhi Law House, 2005.

  4. Herring, Jonathan. Medical Law and Ethics. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

  5. Jackson, Emily. Medical Law. 2nd ed. London: Oxford University, Press, 2010.

  6. Kannan, Justice; Mathiharan.Dr. K. A. Textbook of Medical Jurisprudence and Toxicology. Nagpur: LexisNexis Butterworth Wadhwa, (1920).

  7. Lewis, Charles. Clinical Negligence: A Practical Guide. 6th ed. Haywards Heath: Tottel, 2006.

  8. Mason, J. K., et al. Mason &Mccall Smith's Law and Medical Ethics. 7th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006.

  9. McLean, Sheila. Contemporary Issues in Law, Medicine and Ethics. Aldershot: Dartmouth, 1996.

  10. Miola, José. Medical Ethics and Medical Law: A Symbiotic Relationship. Oxford: Hart, 2007.

  11. Morgan, Derek. Issues in Medical Law and Ethics. London: Cavendish, 2001.

  12. Patnaik, Amrit K., and Mathiharan, K. (Eds). Modi's Textbook of Medical Jurisprudence and Toxicology. Nagpur: LexisNexis Butterworths., 2005.

  13. Pattinson, Shaun D. Medical Law and Ethics. 2nd Ed. London: Sweet &Maxwell; Thomson Reuters, 2009.

  14. Plomer, Aurora. The Law and Ethics of Medical Research: International Bioethics and Human Rights. London: Cavendish, 2004.

  15. Powers, Michael J., and Nigel H. Harris. Clinical Negligence. 3rd ed. London: Edinburgh; Dublin: Butterworths, 2000.

  16. Thomson. Medical Law and Ethics (Law Library). Sweet &Maxwel, 2006.

  17. Veitch, Kenneth. The Jurisdiction of Medical Law. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      

  1. Cameron, Cecily, and Elizabeth-Anne Gumbel. Clinical Negligence: A Practitioner's Handbook. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Print.

  2. Chaudhri, V. K. Medical Jurisprudence and Toxicology. Allahabad: Dwivedi Law Agency, 2007.

  3. Dogra, T. D., and Rudra, AbhijitLyon's Medical Jurisprudence and Toxicology. New Delhi: Delhi Law House, 2005.

  4. Herring, Jonathan. Medical Law and Ethics. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

  5. Jackson, Emily. Medical Law. 2nd ed. London: Oxford University, Press, 2010.

  6. Kannan, Justice; Mathiharan.Dr. K. A. Textbook of Medical Jurisprudence and Toxicology. Nagpur: LexisNexis Butterworth Wadhwa, (1920).

  7. Lewis, Charles. Clinical Negligence: A Practical Guide. 6th ed. Haywards Heath: Tottel, 2006.

  8. Mason, J. K., et al. Mason &Mccall Smith's Law and Medical Ethics. 7th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006.

  9. McLean, Sheila. Contemporary Issues in Law, Medicine and Ethics. Aldershot: Dartmouth, 1996.

  10. Miola, José. Medical Ethics and Medical Law: A Symbiotic Relationship. Oxford: Hart, 2007.

  11. Morgan, Derek. Issues in Medical Law and Ethics. London: Cavendish, 2001.

  12. Patnaik, Amrit K., and Mathiharan, K. (Eds). Modi's Textbook of Medical Jurisprudence and Toxicology. Nagpur: LexisNexis Butterworths., 2005.

  13. Pattinson, Shaun D. Medical Law and Ethics. 2nd Ed. London: Sweet &Maxwell; Thomson Reuters, 2009.

  14. Plomer, Aurora. The Law and Ethics of Medical Research: International Bioethics and Human Rights. London: Cavendish, 2004.

  15. Powers, Michael J., and Nigel H. Harris. Clinical Negligence. 3rd ed. London: Edinburgh; Dublin: Butterworths, 2000.

  16. Thomson. Medical Law and Ethics (Law Library). Sweet &Maxwel, 2006.

  17. Veitch, Kenneth. The Jurisdiction of Medical Law. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007.

 

Evaluation Pattern

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                  – 25%

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

·         Attendance                                                                            – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

                                                                                                    TOTAL 100%

LLM234CALN - LOCAL SELF-GOVERNMENT LAW (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:10
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

With the introduction of the Constitution Seventy third and Seventy fourth amendments, India is moving towards the ideal of direct democracy endowing the local bodies with powers of administration in matters of regional and local importance. This change has added new vistas of Indian democracy and it offers an opportunity to translate the Gandhian concept of Gram Swaraj into practice. Necessarily, a person specializing in administrative law has to be equipped with the knowledge on the working of early systems, the present constitutional scheme, and the legislative powers of the State transferring responsibility to local bodies and on the increasing regulatory and financial powers of the local bodies. The nature of the democratic functioning of these elected bodies and the scope of administrative control as well of the judicial control over them are challenging areas for students of administrative law to evaluate and help formulation of new and pragmatic working methods.

Learning Outcome

At the end of the course students will be able to -

1.      To give an insight into the introductory aspects, the historical and philosophical background for the Local Self –Government.

2.      To learn and familiarize the student about the Constitutional scheme for the local self-government.

3.      This give the students an understanding about the structure, powers and functions of the  urban  local self government

4.      To learn about addressing the issues of decentralization and grass- root planning of the local self-government.

5.      To give an insight into the modern dimensions of local self government.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
INTRODUCTION
 

Learning outcome: This UNIT aims at giving the students an insight into the introductory aspects, the historical and philosophical background for the local self –Government.

1.1. Meaning and genesis of democratic decentralization

1.2. History, Growth and Development of Panchayati Raj in India-Lord Rippon’s resolution, Royal commission, BalwantRai Mehta Committee Report

1.3. Gram Swaraj: Gandhian Concept

1.4. Community Development Programme

1.5. Administrative framework

 

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
CONSTITUTIONAL SCHEME
 

Learning outcome: This UNIT will familiarize the student about the Constitutional scheme for the localself-government.

2.1. Federalism in India and local self government

2.2. Directive Principles of State Policy-Art.40

2.3. 73rd and 74th Constitutional Amendments

2.4. Schedules XI and XII of the Constitution

2.5. Second Administrative Reforms Commission

2.6. Sarkaria commission; Punchi commission and local governments

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
RURAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT
 

Learning outcome: This UNIT aims at familiarizing the students about the structure, powers and functions of the  rural local self government.

3.1. Gram Sabha- Meaning, importance, functions, meetings, Social Audit, Nyayapanchayat

3.2. Gram Panchayat-Introduction, composition, functions, Sarpanch, Powers and functions of Sarpanch

3.3. Taluk/Block Panchayat-Introduction, Composition, functions, Chairman-powers and functions

3.4. ZillaPanchayat-Introduction, composition, functions

3.5. Financial administration-devolution of financial powers, Composition of State Finance commission

3.6. State Control over PRIs

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
URBAN LOCAL GOVERNMENT
 

Learning outcome:

This UNIT aims at giving the student an understanding about the structure, powers and functions of the  urban  local self government

 

4.1.   Municipal Corporation-Organization and functions; Municipal Council; Mayor-functions and powers; committees-wards committees, district planning committee, Metropolitan planning committee;  Municipal commissioner-appointment, tenure, powers and functions

4.2.   Cantonment Boards

4.3.   Special purpose urban development agencies

4.4.   Municipal finance

4.5.  State control and supervision 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
PLANNING FOR PRIs
 

Learning outcome: This UNIT aims at addressing the issues of decentralization and grass- root planning of the localself-government.

5.1. Planning for rural development-Planning machinery at the National and State Levels

5.2.  Role of Panchayat Raj institutions in planning

5.3. Panchayati Raj and Rural Development

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:10
MODERN DIMENSIONS
 

Learning outcome: This UNIT will give an insight into the modern dimensions of local self government.

6.1.Panchayats and NGOs

6.2. Panchayati Raj in Tribal Sub-plan Areas

6.3. Right to Information and Panchayati Raj

6.4. Women Empowerment and Panchayat Raj institutions

6.5. Reservation and Local governments

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1.      Davis, Discretionary Justice

2.      De Smith, Judicial Review of Administrative Action (1995)

3.      Dicey, Introduction to the Law of the Constitution,

4.      Friedman, The State and the Rule of Law in a Mixed Economy

5.      Indian Law Institute, Government Regulation of Private

6.      Ivor Jennings, Law and the Constitution

7.      Jain & Jain, Principles of Administrative Law (1986), Tripathi, Bombay

8.      Joshi, R.P., Narwani, G.S., Panchayat Raj in India: Emerging Trends across the States ( Rawat Publications), Hyderabad, 2011

9.      Khanna, B.S: Panchayati Raj in India- National Perspectives and State Studies (Deep and Deep Publications), New Delhi, 1994.

10.  M. Venketarangaiya& M. Pattabhiram, Local Government in India (1969) Allied, New Delhi

11.  Neville L. Brown and J.F. Garner, French Administrative Law

12.  RadhakumudMookerji, Local Government in Ancient India (1985), Daya Publishing Delhi.

13.  Schwartz & Wade, Legal Control of Government

14.  Sivaramakrishnan, K.C., Courts, Panchayats and Nagapalikas (Academic Foundation), 2009.

15.    W. Thornhill (ed.), the Growth and Reform of English Local Self-government (1971), Weidenfeld andNierlson, London.


 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1.      Davis, Discretionary Justice

2.      De Smith, Judicial Review of Administrative Action (1995)

3.      Dicey, Introduction to the Law of the Constitution,

4.      Friedman, The State and the Rule of Law in a Mixed Economy

5.      Indian Law Institute, Government Regulation of Private

6.      Ivor Jennings, Law and the Constitution

7.      Jain & Jain, Principles of Administrative Law (1986), Tripathi, Bombay

8.      Joshi, R.P., Narwani, G.S., Panchayat Raj in India: Emerging Trends across the States ( Rawat Publications), Hyderabad, 2011

9.      Khanna, B.S: Panchayati Raj in India- National Perspectives and State Studies (Deep and Deep Publications), New Delhi, 1994.

10.  M. Venketarangaiya& M. Pattabhiram, Local Government in India (1969) Allied, New Delhi

11.  Neville L. Brown and J.F. Garner, French Administrative Law

12.  RadhakumudMookerji, Local Government in Ancient India (1985), Daya Publishing Delhi.

13.  Schwartz & Wade, Legal Control of Government

14.  Sivaramakrishnan, K.C., Courts, Panchayats and Nagapalikas (Academic Foundation), 2009.

15.    W. Thornhill (ed.), the Growth and Reform of English Local Self-government (1971), Weidenfeld andNierlson, London.


 

Evaluation Pattern

·         CIA I – Class Test / Assignment / Presentation            – 10%

·         CIA II – Mid Semester Examination                                  – 25%

·         CIA III – Research Topic                                                     – 10%

·         Attendance                                                                            – 05%

·         End Semester Examination                                                – 50%

                                                                                                    TOTAL 100%

LLM251CALN - SEMINAR ON CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:40
No of Lecture Hours/Week:6
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To implement and evaluate an innovative approach to a law seminar course intended to develop students' presentation skills and encourage them to think critically about contemporary legal issues. Further, the objectives of this course are to enhance verbal and written presentation skills of students and to develop analytical skills as students learn about sides of a contemporary issue in legal practice. The students also enhance their skills in providing peer evaluations Specific School curricular competencies addressed by the course are: (1) maintain professional competence by identifying and analyzing emerging issues; and (2) participate in self-learning and professional development

Learning Outcome

On completion of the course students will be able to:

1.     Develop and apply better skills in writing and presentation

2.     Improve their presentation skills

3.     Learn to collect data to keep up with the latest developments in the area of the topic chosen by them 

4.     Select contemporary legal issues, prepare and present topics – thereby enhancing their research and presentation skills

5.     Appreciate and analyse case laws and develop a critical approach towards assessment of case laws thereby enhancing their academic and professional capabilities.

6.     Will have an impression about the varied state of   legal awareness in India and play an active role in spreading legal awareness

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
TIPS ON WRITING AND PRESENTATION SKILLS
 

At the end of this UNIT the students will be equipped with good writing, analytical and   presentation skills

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:20
PRESENTATIONS ON CONTEMPORARY LEGAL ISSUES
 

At the end of this UNIT the students will be equipped with good writing, analytical and   presentation skills on contemporary issues.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
PRESENTATIONS ON CASE LAWS
 

Student will be able to understand the core of case laws 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:4
LEGAL AWARENESS CAMP
 

Students will indulge themselves in Legal awareness camps

Text Books And Reference Books:

NIL

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NIL

Evaluation Pattern

Fifty percent of the evaluation will be done on the basis of student ability to select the contemporary issue and preparing a report. The remaining fifty percent is allotted to presentation of the legal issue.

 

 

LLM252CALN - TEACHING PRACTICE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:10
No of Lecture Hours/Week:1
Max Marks:0
Credits:0

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To equip the students to teach UG law students and make them understand art of preparing for the classes. This course is in continuation of the Practical -II

Learning Outcome

On completion of the course students will be able to:

·       Develop and apply better skills in presentation and teaching

·       Improve their preparation skills

·       Learn to collect data to keep up with the latest developments in the area of the topic chosen by them 

·       The student will be able to prepare a report and comment on the areas of the subject taught by them during teaching. It develops their critical approach to the subject and enhances their capabilities while teaching and in research

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
DESIGN
 

 Students will be assigned a topic from UG courses and they have to prepare and teach the UG students in classroom. Students are required to research and prepare teaching report and notes for the class. Students have to make their presentations before the panel constituted for the purpose before engaging a UG class. Students are required to prepare for the UG class under the guidance of a Teacher. Students have to engage 10 sessions to satisfy the requirement of this course.

Text Books And Reference Books:

N/A

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

N/A

Evaluation Pattern

 Fifty percent of the evaluation will be done on the basis of student ability prepare the teaching notes and preparing a report. The remaining fifty percent is allotted to his performance in the classroom as a teacher.

LLM281CALN - DISSERTATION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:5
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to test the research prowess of the students and their analytical skills. It is aimed at enabling the students to hone their skills as a researcher that would be of immense help to them in their career.

Students are required to select their dissertation topic at the beginning of the academic year (1stSemester) and register with a faculty member for Guidance.

Dissertation work carries 100 marks in total and research report has to be submitted before the commencement of the examination of 2nd Semester.

 

 

TEACHING METHODOLOGY: Lectures, Discussion, Library visit, etc., according to the requirements of the students.

Learning Outcome

 

Students will be able to-

1.      Formulate legal research problem.

2.      Identify proper research methodology to deal with the legal issue.

3.      Apply objective, logical legal reasoning to make arguments and arrive at conclusions

4.      Draft a research report.

 

 

Learning Outcome: This subject will help the students to enhance their research, analytical and writing skills.

 

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
NA
 

NA

Text Books And Reference Books:

NA

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

1.      Research Proposal  -                                    15%

2.      Submission of Progress Report –              15 %

3.      Research Report –                                        60 %

4.      Viva -                                                                         10 %

 

                                                                        TOTAL 100%