Department of SCIENCES NCR

Syllabus for
Bachelor of Science(Data Science and Artificial Intelligence Honours)
Academic Year  (2021)

 
1 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBS191AN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Generic Elective 3 3 100
BBS191BN A LIFE WORTH LIVING - FROM HEALTH TO WELL BEING Generic Elective 3 3 100
BBS191CN MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT Generic Elective 3 3 100
BDA121N PROFESSIONAL ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 100
BDA131N DISCRETE MATHEMATICS Core Courses 3 3 100
BDA132N DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY Core Courses 4 4 100
BDA133N DIGITAL COMPUTER FUNDAMENTALS Core Courses 3 3 100
BDA134N PRINCIPLES OF DATA SCIENCE Core Courses 4 4 100
BDA135N PYTHON PROGRAMMING Core Courses 4 4 100
BDA151N DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS USING EXCEL LAB Core Courses 2 1 50
BDA152N PYTHON LAB Core Courses 4 2 100
BECO191AN INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY Generic Elective 3 3 100
BECO191BN ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION Generic Elective 3 3 95
BPSY191AN SCIENCE OF WELLNESS Generic Elective 3 3 100
BPSY191BN ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY Generic Elective 3 3 100
ENG191AN INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES Generic Elective 3 3 100
ENG191BN DIGITAL HUMANITIES Generic Elective 3 3 100
2 Semester - 2021 - Batch
Course Code
Course
Type
Hours Per
Week
Credits
Marks
BBS291AN APPLIED ETHICS-A MULTICULTURAL APPROACH Skill Enhancement Course 3 3 100
BBS291BN GLOBAL LEADERSHIP AND CULTURE Skill Enhancement Course 3 3 100
BBS291CN COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES Skill Enhancement Course 3 3 100
BDA221N COMMUNICATIVE ENGLISH Ability Enhancement Compulsory Course 3 2 100
BDA231N DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS Core Courses 3 3 100
BDA232N RANDOM VARIABLES AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS Core Courses 4 4 100
BDA233N OPERATING SYSTEM Core Courses 3 3 100
BDA234N DATA STRUCTURES Core Courses 4 4 100
BDA251N DATA STRUCTURES LAB Core Courses 4 2 100
BDA252N R PROGRAMMING AND STATISTICAL MODELLING LAB Core Courses 4 4 100
BECO291BN DESINGING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Skill Enhancement Course 3 3 100
BECO291CN ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS AND ITS INTERLINKAGE WITH INDUSTRY Skill Enhancement Course 3 3 100
BENG291BN GLOBAL ETHICS FOR CONTEMPORARY SOCIETIES Skill Enhancement Course 3 3 100
BPSY291AN APPRECIATING AESTHETICS Skill Enhancement Course 3 3 100
BPSY291BN HUMAN ENGINEERING AND ERGONOMICS Skill Enhancement Course 3 3 100
ENG291AN CREATIVE WRITING Skill Enhancement Course 3 3 100
      

    

Department Overview:

The Department of Computational Sciences at CHRIST (Deemed to be University) Delhi- NCR has created a niche in the realm of higher education in India through its programmes. Currently, the Department offers a wide array of undergraduate courses with multiple specializations in the disciplines of Computer Science, Statistics & Mathematics. A dedicated research block with all the latest research facilities boosts the morale of the faculty and research scholars alike. This is an ideal place for students with a research blend of mind to explore his/her passion. Apart from academics, students are moulded holistically through various co-curricular and extracurricular activities. To promote the holistic development of the students and to sustain the academic creativity and inventiveness of the faculty the department engages in numerous workshops, seminars, industrial interfaces, faculty development programmes and many such endeavours. It is equipped with a highly committed team of instructors having versatile experience in teaching and research. The department also provides opportunities to work on collaborative projects with industry and international universities. 

Mission Statement:

VISION

The Department of Computational Sciences endeavours to imbibe the vision of the University “Excellence and Service”. The department is committed to this philosophy which pervades every aspect and functioning of the department.

MISSION

“To develop a computational scientist with ethical and human values”. To accomplish our mission, the department encourages students to apply their acquired knowledge and skills towards professional achievements in their career. The department also moulds the students to be socially responsible and ethically sound.

Introduction to Program:

BSc Data Science and Artificial Intelligence (Honours): 

Bachelor of Science (BSc) in Data Science & Artificial Intelligence (Honours) integrates two major areas, Data Science and Artificial Intelligence, in a collaborative manner. It is a 3-year course designed to prepare graduates who can conduct data-driven investigations using statistical techniques and utilising Artificial Intelligence on different algorithmic techniques. This course will empower the graduates to develop an in-depth knowledge focusing on data science and the techniques for analysing the quantitative and qualitative data and developing a cutting-edge solution. Students will be able to apply the concepts for identifying the patterns and trends in the data from various sectors such as banking, production, manufacturing, finance, retails, healthcare etc. The comprehensive curriculum is a blend of core and advanced specialist subjects. The emphasis of the curriculum is based on the principle that the subjects get more and more specialised as you go ahead through the program. The course structure starts with general courses comprising the basics of Mathematics, Statistics, Computer programming, Databases. It then gradually specialised in Artificial Intelligence and Data Science domain which shall include Machine learning, Deep Learning, Database, Algorithms etc. exposing students to unlock the power of automation, Artificial Intelligence and Analytics. Upon successful completion of course the graduates shall be able to understand and apply the Data Science and AI concepts for solving real-world problems.  

Program Objective:
Assesment Pattern

CIA : 50%

ESE : 50%

Examination And Assesments

CIA : 50%

ESE : 50%

BBS191AN - SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Today many people are still far from being able to meet their basic needs, especially in developing countries. SD not only addresses the question of inter-generational justice but also this intra-generational issue: How to improve the life of the poor without overburdening the ecosystems? This is a challenge for individual lifestyles (especially in rich nations), for companies and for government policy. The lecture provides a basic understanding of these challenges, introduces strategies and instruments for sustainable development.

·     To create a sense of ownership of issues related to CSR, Environment and sustainability of businesses.

·     Understand the basic concept of Sustainable Development (SD), the environmental, social and economic dimensions.

·     To teach how to critically analyze, evaluate and judge competing perspectives on the challenge of creating a sustainable future.

·     To understand the Sustainable development challenge for companies, their responsibility and their potentials for action.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Concern for society and nature

CO2: Ability to create sustainable organizations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:7
Sustainability
 

Meaning and Scope, Corporate Social Responsibility, Sustainability, Sustainability Terminologies and Meanings, why is Sustainability an Imperative, Sustainability Case Studies, Triple Bottom Line (TBL)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:7
Is it possible to combine sustainability and business success?
 

Reasons to adopt sustainable strategy by firms, tools used by the firm to implement their sustainable development strategies, evaluation of firm’s commitment to sustainable strategies by the stakeholders

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:7
Environmental Management Systems: Using Standards, Certification and other Systems to further SD goals
 

Introduction, Global management systems exist to guide firms in establishing and implementing a strategy, how do these various approaches, including certification, encourage sustainable business practices.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Taking charge and working together to change the future
 

Establishing priorities for sustainable future, Role of women in sustainability, Challenge of creating a green economy, Sustainability crisis in 21st century, failures of global capitalism, transforming global capitalism, creating a restorative economy

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Corporate Sustainability Reporting Frameworks
 

Global Reporting Initiative Guidelines, National Voluntary Guidelines on Social, Environmental and Economic Responsibilities of, Business, International Standards, Sustainability Indices, Principles of Responsible Investment, Challenges in Mainstreaming Sustainability Reporting, Sustainability Reporting Case Studies

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Legal framework, conventions, treaties on Environmental and social aspects
 

United Nations Conference on Human Environment, United Nations Environment Programme Brundtland Commission United Nations Conference on Environment and Development Agenda 21, Rio Declaration on Environment and Development, Statement of Forest Principles United Nations Framework Convention on climate change, Convention on Biological Diversity, Kyoto Protocol, Bali Roadmap, United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, Rio+20, Millennium Development Goals to Sustainable Development Goals.

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Andrew Crane & Dirk Matten (2010). Business ethics, Oxford.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Balachandran V, &Chandrashekharan V, (2011). CorporateGovernance, Ethics and social responsibility, PHI.

2.  Concepts of Environmental Management for Sustainable Development.

3.  Baxi C. V &Rupamanjari Sinha Ray, (2012). Corporate Social Responsibility: A Study of CSR Practices in Indian Industry, Vikas Publishing House.

4.   Corporate Goverance – Badi N. V, Vrinda Publications, 2012.

5.   Fernando A. C, (2011). Corporate Governance: principles, policies and practices, Pearson.

6.   Ghosh B. N, (2012). Business Ethics and Corporate Governance , Tata McGraw-Hill.

7. Keshoo Prasad, Corporate Governance -, PHI.

8. Lawrence and Weber, (2010). Business and Society, Tata McGraw-Hill.

9. Prakash Pillappa, (2012). Civic Sense, Excel Books.

 

 

8.  Lawrence and Weber, (2010). Business and Society, Tata McGraw-Hill.

2.       Prakash Pillappa, (2012). Civic Sense, Excel Books.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I - Written assignment 30 Marks

CIA II -  Written assignment, Quiz 30 Marks

CIA III - Written assignment, Quiz 35 marks 

Attendance -5 Marks

 

BBS191BN - A LIFE WORTH LIVING - FROM HEALTH TO WELL BEING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

To examine health in its truest sense, one must explore beyond the limits of medicine to engage a much wider set of questions embracing social, cultural, political, economic, moral and spiritual aspects of human experience. The aim of this course is for students to gain greater insight into the multi-dimensional aspects of health and to develop a more holistic and humanistic appreciation of wellbeing in both a personal and societal context. The course focuses on the knowledge and skills students require to lead a healthy, productive and balanced life

Learning Outcome

CO1: Explain health as a multi-dimensional and dynamic concept, which necessarily integrates individual, societal, biomedical, spiritual, cultural and historical influences, and how this relates to health issues encountered in everyday life.

CO2: Assess the inter-relatedness of health perceptions and practices across cultures.

CO3: Discuss personal responsibilities towards achieving wellbeing in a rational way and how this contributes to the individual, community and global good

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Introduction to health
 

Health of individuals and communities – The significance of determinants of health and how these raise or lower the health of individuals and communities - Health promotion to improve health - Personal and popular attitudes and beliefs and their impact on decision making - self-management - interpersonal and key consumer health skills - Factors influencing health, and actions and strategies to protect and promote health, through investigation and inquiry processes.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Food and Values
 

Philosophy of food, Values – Three different types of valuesMeat – Is it wrong to eat animals? Hunger – Do we have a duty to help starving people? - Drugs – Why is it wrong to take drugs? - GM food – How should food technology be regulated? - Capitalism – Food, globalization, and equality - Art – Can food be art? What is art? - Taste – Is taste entirely subjective? - Science – Can science explain conscious taste experiences? -Eating – Eat to live, or live to eat.

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Nutrition
 

Balanced diet & Nutrition, Macro and micro nutrients – Nutritive and nonnutritive components of diet – Eating for weight control – healthy weight – The pitfalls of dieting – food intolerance and food myths – Food supplements for adolescents.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Physical Education
 

Concept of physical education – Meaning – definition – aims – objectives of physical education and fitness – Need & importance of fitness – Types of fitness – Health related physical fitness – performance related physical fitness – physical activities and health benefits - Activities for developing physical fitness

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Sleep
 

What is sleep? – The phylogeny of sleep – Developmental course of sleep – Dreams- Functions of sleep – Daytime sleepiness and alertness – Sleep disorders

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:8
Safety education and health promotion
 

Principles of accident prevention – health and safety in daily life – health and safety at work – first aid and emergency care – common injuries and their management

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:7
Spirituality, Religion and Social Change
 

Meaning of life - Meaning of death- Indian Rituals, symbols, and myths - Spirituality, altruism and moral justice - Resources to deal with stress, temptations, disappointments and failures, social oppression, the loss of possessions and of loved ones, and with one’s own death

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Mental Health & wellbeing -Gill Hasson

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Mental Health & wellbeing -Gill Hasson

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1-30 marks

CIA 2-30 marks

CIA 3-30 marks

Attendance-5 marks

Class participation-5 marks

BBS191CN - MAHABHARATHA AND MODERN MANAGEMENT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Meaning of life - Meaning of death- Indian Rituals, symbols, and myths - Spirituality, altruism and moral justice - Resources to deal with stress, temptations, disappointments and failures, social oppression, the loss of possessions and of loved ones, and with one’s own death. 

The Mahabharata of the great Maharishi Veda Vyasa is a treasure trove of knowledge, principles and paradigms. It is written that what is not in the Mahabharata will not be found elsewhere. Written nearly thousands of years ago, the Mahabharata is as yet a source of knowledge, especially modern management principles.In essence it highlights the victory of Dharma in times of Adharma.This subject is a comprehensive learning on management lessons which can be inferred from the great epic. It gives a clear understanding and comparison of management Principles, practices and the various functions of management with the epic. The syllabus is structured to provide basic conceptual knowledge on the principles of management. It also deals with behavioral issues in the individual processes, group and interpersonal processes.

 

Course Objectives:

  • ·         Discuss the epic by summarizing the various parvas/units in class in accordance with the management concepts
  • ·         Review and make a critical estimate of the epic with a focus on morals, ethics, legal and management concepts 
  •            To develop competencies and knowledge of students to become effective professionals

Learning Outcome

CO1: Students will get to know team work and group dynamics

CO2: Students will get to know determination and hard work and its implication on business decision

CO3: Students will be able to appreciate the role of general management for the success of an organization

CO4: This subject will enable them to enhance their Moral, social, ethical and professional skills

CO5: To understand the manner in which strategic and competitive advantage is developed

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction to Mahabharatha
 

The older generations-The Pandava and Kaurava princes- Lakshagraha (the house of lac) Establishment of the kingdom-Administration and Management principles

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Marriage and Building of New city
 

Marriage to Draupadi- An event study approach.

 

Indraprastha-A new beginning- Pressure for change – Change process, Types of change, Factors influencing change, Resistance to change

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
The Big Game
 

The dice game- Cooperative strategies & Reasons for strategic alliances-

 

Exile and return- Risks and costs of strategic alliances

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
The battle at Kurukshetra
 

The battle at Kurukshetra - Strategic Planning and Management- levels at which strategy operates- Event approaches to strategic decision making,

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Post Kurukshetra
 

The end of the Pandavas- Succession Planning,Authority and Responsibility

 

The reunion Organizing- Choosing the organizational structure 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Stoner, Freeman, Gilbert Jr. (2014). Management (6th edition), New Delhi: Prentice Hall India.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Rao, V.S.P., & Krishna, V.H., (2011). Strategic Management: Text and Cases. New Delhi: Excel Books.

Pratap Chandra Roy ,The complete Mahabharata translated into English prose directly from the original sanskrit text.(1st Edition) oriental publishing co.

 

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - 70 ( 65+5)

ESE - 30

BDA121N - PROFESSIONAL ENGLISH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course focuses on preparing students to communicate verbally and non-verbally in an effective manner. The aim is to introduce students to communicate in a professional environment. It is instrumental in learners comprehending the role of technical English in communication. 

Objectives:

1. Introduce learners to language skills in their area of specialization.

2. Enable them to enhance career prospects and employability through English language skills

3. Help students gain an understanding of language at the workplace

4. To develop verbal and non-verbal skills in English communication

Learning Outcome

CO1: 1. Comprehension and demonstration of language in the field of technology

CO2: 2. Prepare individuals as Independent communicators

CO3: 3. Illustrate professional requirements through language proficiency

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:8
Reviewing grammar
 

This unit undertakes to revise the foundation of language; the grammar section of language learning. Students will be reviewed the grammar aspects mentioned through task-based activities

  • Concept of time in language – reflective learning will be used to help students detect their grammatical errors in tenses and rectify.
  • Degrees of comparison – using technical literature students can be engaged in apprehending degrees of comparison. 
  • Direct and reported speech – to enable learners to carry on a comprehensible conversation either spoken or written, in a business context.
  • Subject-verb agreement – through worksheets and task-based learning students will be familiarized to construct error-free sentences
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Technical vocabulary
 

Learners will be acquainted with the basics of English language learning. They will be taught to identifying technical vocabulary from the general. Technical magazines prescribed by the institution that are subject-specific can be used as teaching tools.

  • Introduction to the technical lexicon – help students identify jargon and technical terminologies. Assist them to comprehend the significance of implementation with moderation through their subject literature.
  • Internet lexis and contextualization – provide meanings accurately to ensure the right exercise of terms in a professional scenario through hands-on experience.
  • Circumstantial usage of diction – aid the comprehension of word usage as verbs and nouns based on the requirement. Differentiating the meanings of synonyms and their orientation in a text.
  •  Integrating technical vocabulary in describing process and procedure – through prescribed texts students can be made to enhance their language by right integration of diction.
  • Mind mapping of textual diction and allied words – diagrammatically mapping of words based on their meaning, context, and usage will re-emphasize the words in the minds of the learners.
Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Rereading texts
 

Having gained familiarity with technical and subject-specific vocabulary, students will be introduced to the types of reading. The basic receptive skill will help students prioritise and eliminate content.

  • Reading strategies – acquaint the learners with the functions and benefits of reading strategy in the academic and professional set-up.
  • Reading: skimming, scanning – introduce learners to the types of reading. The integral aspects of each method will be familiarized to the students. They can be given practice sessions through subject material provided.
  • Intensive and extensive reading – benefits and features of the two types of reading can be elaborated. To emphasise to the learner the difference, practice sessions with subject material can be carried out.
  • Summarising – consolidation of key ideas can be carried out in the spoken and written format. Technical literature can be provided for the purpose. 
Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Non - verbal communication
 

The ancillaries of speaking skill are in focus here. Prior to delving into the productive skill, the nitty-gritty that enhances its effectiveness is made familiar to the learner. Classroom activities and vicarious learning through case studies and video clippings can be screened.

  • Competence in non-verbal communication- create an awareness of the role of non-verbal communication in a professional set-up.
  • Functions of non-verbal communication – the various utilities of nonverbal communication can be elaborated to students with case studies.
  • Benefits of non-verbal communication – elucidate the advantages of non-verbal communication with reference to cultural distinctions.
  • Proxemics, Chronemics, Kinesics, Haptics, Gestures, Paralanguage - vicarious learning of these aspects of non-verbal communication can be carried out through video clippings of suitable material and print media
Unit-5
Teaching Hours:4
Communication strategies
 

The productive skills are finessed through the identification and refining of the elements mentioned in this unit. They contribute to the holistic presentation. Task-based activities must be used to practise. Business Communication texts and worksheets will provide ample support.

Nuances of communication – communication in the workplace requires knowing the dos and don’ts of professional communication. An introduction to listening, speaking, reading and writing with reference to professional communication can be provided.

  • Opening techniques
  • Speech markers
  • Fillers
  • Turn-taking
  • Backchannelling
  • Dealing with interruptions

Every element mentioned can be elaborated. Ample examples can be provided through audiovisual media, it can be provided to them through demonstrations and verbal reinforcement language checklists can be provided to aid students understand the implementation of the elements. A follow up through mock sessions must be carried out in groups

Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Writing skill
 

Having dealt with speaking skill in the previous unit, the other productive skill; writing is taken into consideration here. The various forms of writing in an official context will be taught in form and content.

  • Report writing – a corporate requirement is the ability to report on meetings and conferences. The format and requirements of report writing can be taught to the students through samples and later they can be made to draft reports of their own and peer evaluated
  • Note-taking – corporate atmosphere calls for not taking at every step. Students need to be taught the framework of note-taking. They can be given samples as references. Later they can be made to listen to technical audio clips and provide the note-taking carried out at an individual level.
  • Minutes – corporate life calls for being in attendance of numerous meetings. Taking down the minutes is a skill that is assumed to be possessed by one. The essentials of maintaining the minutes must be made conversant through illustrations. This can be emphasized by classroom activities of the same.
Unit-7
Teaching Hours:8
Professional communication
 

Lastly, students will be introduced to typical work scenarios through hands-on sessions.

  • Small talk – the purpose and role of small talk must be taught to the students. They can be screened video clippings of the same. Mock sessions can be performed in the class. The key phrases and language used can be imparted through the provision of language worksheets and skills checklists.
  • Meeting- types of meetings, the hierarchy of most often featuring members, etiquette to be held at the meeting and the duties to be performed can be taught implicitly. Chairing, setting the agenda, controlling the smooth functioning, participating, deliberating and diplomacy must be made clear. The key phrases and language used can be taught through language worksheets and skills checklists.
  • Group discussion – group discussions are carried out at every level. Students must be familiarized with the basics of group discussions. Agreeing, disagreeing, and being diplomatic are essentials to be imparted. The soft skills and language essentials most commonly noted can be made comprehensible to the students. Vicarious learning and language charts can be used as learning tools.
Text Books And Reference Books:

Booher, Dianna. E- Writing: 21st Century Tools for Effective Communication. Macmillan, 2008.

Knapp .M. Essentials of Non-Verbal Communication Theory Rea. FL: Harcourt, 1995.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Driscoll, Liz. Common Mistakes at Intermediate and How to Avoid Them. CUP, 2008.

[2] Carter, Ronald and Michael McCarthy. Cambridge Grammar of English. CUP, 2006.

[3] Leech, Geoffrey, Jan Svartvik. A Communicative Grammar of English. Third Edition. New Delhi: Pearson Education, 2009.

Evaluation Pattern

Internal Assessment- 50%

End Semester Examination- 50%

BDA131N - DISCRETE MATHEMATICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The purpose of this course is to understand and use (abstract) discrete structures that are backbones  of computer science. In particular, this class is meant to introduce logic, proofs, sets, relations,  functions and counting, basics of graph theory with an emphasis on applications in computer  science.

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand the notion of Sets, mathematical proofs and relations functions. Students will be able to apply them in problem solving.

CO2: Understand the basics of combinatorics- and be able to apply the methods from these subjects in problem solving.

CO3: Write precise and accurate mathematical definitions of basics concepts in graph theory.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Set Theory and Counting Principles
 

Set Theory-Introduction- Combination of sets-Set Identities. Mathematical Induction-inclusion and  exclusion- pigeon-hole principle- permutation- combination- summations. Introduction to  recurrence relations and generating functions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Relations and functions
 

Relations and Products- Functions as Relations- Relations on a Set-Properties of Relations:  reflexive-irreflexive-symmetric-asymmetric-antisymmetric, transitive- inverse. One-to-One and  onto functions-One to one correspondence-Inverse functions and compositions of functions Graphs of functions-Floor-ceiling-greatest Integer functions.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Propositional and Predicate Logic
 

Propositional Logic, Applications of Propositional Logic, Propositional Equivalences,  Predicates and Quantifiers.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Methods of Proof
 

Nested Quantifiers, Rules of Inference, Introduction to Proofs, Proof Methods and  Strategy.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Graphs
 

Graphs – introduction – isomorphism – sub graphs-types of graphs-Results related to  graphs – walks- paths - circuits – connectedness – components – Euler graphs –  Hamiltonian paths and circuits.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] K. H. Rosen- Discrete Mathematics and its Applications- 7th ed.- McGraw – Hill 2012.  

[2] Floyd- Thomas L: Digital Computer Fundamentals- 11thEdition- Pearson  International- 2015. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] R.P. Grimaldi and B.V. Ramana- Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics- An  applied introduction- 5th ed.- Pearson Education- 2007.  

[2] R.P. Grimaldi- Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics- Addison Wesley, 5th ed., 2004. 

[3] D. S. Chandrasekharaiah- Discrete Mathematical Structures- 6th ed.- India: PRISM   Book Pvt. Ltd.- 2019.  

[4] J. P. Tremblay and R. Manohar- Discrete Mathematical Structures with Application  to  Computer Science- Reprint- India: Tata McGraw Hill Education- 2008.  

[5] Liu and Mohapatra- “Elements of Discrete Mathematics”- McGraw Hill, 4th ed., 2017.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA - 50%

ESE - 50%

BDA132N - DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to introduce the historical development of statistics - presentation of data - descriptive measures and fitting mathematical curves for the data. This course also introduces measurement of the relationship of quantitative and qualitative data and the concept of probability.

This course will help the learner to

     ● To enable the students to understand and present the data.

     ● To enable the students to understand and apply the descriptive measures and probability for data analysis.

     ● Implement theoretical concepts of descriptive measures and probability.

     ● To study the study the relationship between variables

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the history of statistics and present the data in various forms.

CO2: Infer the concept of correlation and regression for relating two or more related variables.

CO3: Demonstrate the probabilities for various events.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Organization and Presentation of data
 

Origin and development of Statistics - Scope - limitation and misuse of statistics. Types of data: primary - secondary - quantitative and qualitative data. Types of Measurements: nominal - ordinal - discrete and continuous data. Presentation of data by tables: construction of frequency distributions for discrete and continuous data - graphical representation of a frequency distribution by histogram and frequency polygon - cumulative frequency distributions (inclusive and exclusive methods).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Descriptive Statistics
 

Measures of location or central tendency: Arithmetic mean - Median - Mode - Geometric mean - Harmonic mean. Partition values: Quartiles- Deciles and percentiles. Measures of dispersion: Mean deviation - Quartile deviation - Standard deviation - Coefficient of variation. Moments: measures of skewness - Kurtosis.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:11
Correlation and Regression
 

Correlation: Scatter plot - Karl Pearson coefficient of correlation - Spearman's rank correlation coefficient - multiple and partial correlations (for 3 variates only). Regression: Concept of errors - Principles of Least Square - Simple linear regression and its properties.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:13
Basics of Probability
 

Random experiment - sample point and sample space - event - algebra of events. Definition of Probability: classical - empirical and axiomatic approaches to probability - properties of probability. Theorems on probability - conditional probability and independent events - Laws of total probability - Baye’s theorem and its applications.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Association of Attributes
 

Relation between class frequencies - consistency of data - independence of attributes - criterion of independence - association of attributes: Yule’s coefficient of association - Yule ‘coefficient of colligation.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Gupta S.C and Kapoor V.K - Fundamentals of Mathematical Statistics- 12th edition- Sultan Chand & Sons- New Delhi- 2017.

[2] Mukhopadhyay P - Mathematical Statistics - Books and Allied (P) Ltd- Kolkata, 3rd ed., 2018.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Walpole R.E - Myers R.H - and Myers S.L - Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists-Pearson- New Delhi- 2017.

[2] Montgomery D.C and Runger G.C - Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers - Wiley India - New Delhi-9th ed., 2016.

[3] Agarwal B.L - Basic Statistics - 6th Edition - New Age International Publication - 2015.

[4] Rohatgi V.K and Saleh E - An Introduction to Probability and Statistics - 3 rd edition- John Wiley & Sons Inc.- New Jersey- 2015.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA: 50%

ESE: 50%

BDA133N - DIGITAL COMPUTER FUNDAMENTALS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This is an introductory course that provides the required knowledge about the digital fundamentals of computers. The course covers a few topics like number systems, logic gates, and flips flops. The course starts with an introduction to number systems and its applications in computers. The discussion about the working of devices like encoders and decoders, multiplexers, and demultiplexers are dealt with.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Use math and Boolean algebra in performing computations in various Number systems.

CO2: Simplify Boolean algebraic expressions.

CO3: Design efficient combinational and sequential logic circuit

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Number System and Codes
 

Number systems-Decimal numbers - Binary numbers-Counting in binary- The weighted structure of binary numbers- Octal numbers- hexadecimal numbers and their mutual conversions -Binary arithmetic-Addition- subtraction- multiplication and division of binary numbers- 1‘s and 2‘s complement- signed numbers- arithmetic operations-additionsubtraction with signed numbers- 9‘s and 10‘s complement- BCD numbers- BCD additionBCD subtraction- Gray code-Binary to Gray code conversion- Gray to Binary conversionWeighted code-8421 code and Non weighted codes : ASCII and EBCDIC.  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:8
Boolean Algebra
 

Boolean operations and expressions, Laws and rules of boolean algebra, Demorgan‘s Theorem, Boolean expressions, Simplification of a Boolean expression. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:8
Logic Gates
 

Teaching Hours:8 AND gate, OR gate, NOT gate, NAND gate, NOR gate, X-OR gate, X-NOR gate, The universal property of NAND gate and NOR gate, Realization of basic gates. The boolean expression for logic circuits, Karnaugh map SOP with examples. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Combinational Logic
 

 Basic Adders: Half adder, Full adder, 4-bit Parallel adders, Subtractor: Half subtractor, Full subtractor Implementation using logic gates, Decoders: 4-bit decoder, BCD to decimal decoder, Encoder: Decimal to BCD encoder, Multiplexer: 4 to 1 multiplexer, Demultiplexer: 1 to 4 demultiplexer.  

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Flip Flop
 

Flip-flops Latches: SR latch, Clocked flip-flops: SR flip-flop, D flip-flop, JK flip-flop, Positive edge-triggered flip flops, Timing diagrams, Master-slave JK flip-flop.

 

 

Self-Learning Introduction to RAM- SRAM- DRAM- ROM- PROM- EPROM- EEPROM.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Floyd- Thomas L: Digital Computer Fundamentals- 11th Edition- Pearson International- 2015.

 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Malvino, Paul Albert, Leach, Donald P,Gautam Saha: Digital Principles And Applications, TMH ,8th Edition, 2015.

[2] Bartee,Thomas C: Digital Computer Fundamentals, 6 Edition,TMH, 2010. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA_50%

ESE_50%

BDA134N - PRINCIPLES OF DATA SCIENCE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The Course enables Students to

  • Provide a strong foundation for data science and application areas related to it.
  • Understand the underlying core concepts and emerging technologies in data science.
  • Learn the process of working with data on large scale.
  • Explore the concepts of Data Processing.
  • Learn basic concepts of Machine Learning.
  • Prepare students for advanced courses in Data Science.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand the fundamental concepts of data science.

CO2: Evaluate the data analysis techniques for applications handling large data and demonstrate the data science process.

CO3: Understand concept of machine learning used in the data science process

CO4: Visualize and present the inference using various tools.

CO5: : Learn to think through the ethics surrounding privacy, data sharing

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Data Evolution
 

Data to Data Science – Understanding data: Introduction – Type of Data, Data Evolution – Data Sources.

Preparing and gathering data and knowledge - Philosophies of data science - data all around us: the virtual wilderness - Data wrangling: from capture to domestication - Data science in a big data world - Benefits and uses of data science and big data - facets of data.  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Digital Data-An Imprint
 

Introduction to Big Data: - Evolution of Big Data - What is Big Data – Sources of Big Data. Characteristics of Big Data 6Vs – Big Data-Challenges of Conventional Systems- -– Data Processing Models – Limitation of Conventional Data Processing Approaches – Big Data. Big Data Exploration - The Big data Ecosystem and Data science.

Overview of the data science process - retrieving data - Cleansing, integrating, and transforming data. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Machine learning
 

Modelling Process – Training model – Validating model – Predicting new observations –Supervised learning, Unsupervised learning, Semisupervised learning. Exploratory data analysis.  

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
First steps in big data
 

Distributing data storage and processing with frameworks - Case study: Assessing risk when loaning money - Join the NoSQL movement - Introduction to NoSQL - Case Study. The rise of graph databases - Introducing connected data and graph databases.  

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Ethics and Data Science
 

Doing Good Data Science, Data Ownership, The Five Cs, Implementing the Five Cs, Ethics and Security Training, Developing Guiding Principles, Building Ethics into a Data-Driven Culture, Regulation, Building Our Future, Case Study. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. Introducing Data Science, Davy Cielen, Arno D. B. Meysman and Mohamed Ali, Manning Publications, 2016.
2. Think Like a Data Scientist, Brian Godsey, Manning Publications, 2017.
3. Ethics and Data Science, Mike Loukides, Hilary Mason and D J Patil, O’Reilly, 1st edition, 2018

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. Data Science from Scratch: First Principles with Python, Joel Grus, O’Reilly, 1st edition, 2015.
2. Doing Data Science, Straight Talk from the Frontline, Cathy O'Neil, Rachel Schutt, O’ Reilly, 1st edition, 2013.
3. Mining of Massive Datasets, Jure Leskovec, Anand Rajaraman, Jeffrey David Ullman, Cambridge University Press, 2nd edition, 2014.
4. An Introduction to Statistical Learning: with Applications in R, Gareth James, Daniela Witten, Trevor Hastie, Robert Tibshirani, Springer, 1st edition, 2013. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA: 50%

ESE: 50%

BDA135N - PYTHON PROGRAMMING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course covers the programming paradigms associated with python. It explores the programming language concepts like Data Types- Loops- Functions; Python Lists- Strings- Tuples-Dictionaries of python with help of built in modules. The objective of this course is to provide comprehensive knowledge of python programming paradigms.

Learning Outcome

CO1: To know the basics of algorithmic problem solving

CO2: To develop Python programs with conditionals and loops.

CO3: To use Python data structures - lists- tuples- dictionaries.

CO4: To do input/output with files in Python.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Algorithm Problem Solving
 

Algorithms- building blocks of algorithms (statements- state- control flow- functions)- notation (pseudo code- flow chart- programming language)- algorithmic problem solving- simple strategies for developing algorithms (iteration- recursion).

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to Python
 

Python Introduction- Technical Strength of Python- Introduction to Python Interpreter and program execution- Using Comments- Literals- Constants- Python’s Built-in Data types- Numbers (IntegersFloats- Complex Numbers- Real- Sets)- Strings (Slicing- Indexing- Concatenation- other operations on Strings)- Accepting input from Console- printing statements- Simple ‘Python’ programs.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:13
Operators- Expressions and Python Statements
 

Assignment statement- expressions- Arithmetic- Relational- Logical- Bitwise operators and their precedence- Conditional statements: if- if-else- if-elif-else; simple programs- Notion of iterative computation and control flow –range function- While Statement- For loop- break statementContinue Statement- Pass statement- else- assert.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:13
Sequence Data Types
 

Lists: list operations- list slices- list methods- list loop- mutability- aliasing- cloning lists- list parameters-Slicing- Indexing- Concatenation- other operations on Sequence data type; Tuples: tuple assignment- tuple as return value;Dictionaries: operations and methods; advanced list processing – list comprehension; Examples to include finding the maximum- minimum- mean; linear search on list/tuple of numbersand counting the frequency of elements in a list using a dictionary.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
Introduction to Packages
 

Introduction to NumPy – Ndim – Shape – Size – Dtype – Itemsize - Reshape - Introduction to Pandas, series objects, Data frame Objects, Panel Objects , various functions.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
File Processing
 

Concept of Files- File opening in various modes and closing of a file- Reading from a file- Writing onto a file- File functions-open()- close()- read()- readline()-readlines()-write()- writelines()-tell()-seek()- Command Line arguments.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Python Programming using problem solving Approach by Reema Thareja, Oxford University, Higher Education Oxford University Press; First edition (10 June 2017), ISBN-10: 0199480173.
[2] Y. Daniel Liang “Introduction to Programming using Python” Pearson.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Robert Sedgewick, Kevin Wayne, Robert Dondero, “Introduction to Programming in Python” Pearson.
[2] Mrak Litz, “Learning Python”, O’ Reilly.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA: 50%

ESE: 50%

BDA151N - DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS USING EXCEL LAB (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:30
No of Lecture Hours/Week:2
Max Marks:50
Credits:1

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is designed to provide a practical exposure to the students in Basic concepts of Excel and different way of representation and exploratory data analysis in excel. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Perform calculations and apply excel functions.

CO2: Represent data using charts and diagrams.

CO3: Perform exploratory data analysis using Data Analysis Pack(DAP).

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:30
List of Programs
 

1. Excel worksheets: add worksheet- rename- save and delete- record worksheet and various operations on worksheet, freezing panes and splitting window.

2. Cell referencing, Linking, and conditional formatting.

3. Apply Text to column, Data validation and checks using excel.

4. Creating Pivot table and Pivot chart.

5. Apply formulas like financial, look up, maths, statistics, engineering etc.

6. Apply filter and advanced filter, sorting. 7. Diagrammatic representation and Graphical representation.

8. Descriptive statistics using statistical functions and Data Analysis Pack (DAP).

9. Exercise on correlation, Correlation matrix, partial and multiple correlation coefficient.

10. Draw a scatter plot and fit trend line for a bivariate data set. 

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Gupta S.C and Kapoor V.K- Fundamentals of Mathematical Statistics- 12th edition- Sultan Chand & Sons- New Delhi- 2017.
[2] Mukhopadhyay P- Mathematical Statistics- Books and Allied (P) Ltd- Kolkata, 3rd ed., 2018. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Walpole R.E- Myers R.H- and Myers S.L- Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists-Pearson- New Delhi- 2017.
[2] Montgomery D.C and Runger G.C- Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers- Wiley India- New Delhi-9th ed., 2016.
[3] Agarwal B.L- Basic Statistics- 6 th Edition- New Age International Publication- 2015.
[4] Rohatgi V.K and Saleh E- An Introduction to Probability and Statistics- 3 rd edition- John Wiley & Sons Inc.- New Jersey- 2015. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA: 50%

ESE: 50%

BDA152N - PYTHON LAB (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is designed to provide a practical exposure to python and its applications.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand and develop Computational Thinking concepts.

CO2: Describe python programs that appropriately utilize built-in functions and control flow statements

CO3: Represent compound data using Python lists- tuples- dictionaries

CO4: Be able to do input/output with files in Python

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
List of Programs
 

1. Write a program to demonstrate basic data type in python.
2. Write a program to implement various operators in python.
3. Write a program to implement various conditional statements in python.
4. Write a program to implement various looping statements in python.
5. Write a program to implement various string operations.
6. Write a program to demonstrate list & related functions in python.
7. Write a program to demonstrate tuple & related functions in python.
8. Write a program to demonstrate Dictionary & related functions in python.
9. Write a program to read and write from a file, and copy a file
10. Write a program to implement numpy and pandas packages.
11. Apply scaling mechanism by considering the employee data (based on the given data set).
12. Demonstrate the normalization process and implement the same with customer data of bank.
13. Apply at least 3 sampling techniques to get the best data from the population.
14. Demonstrate the missing value imputations.
15. Demonstrate the usage of outlier detection.
16. Apply various data summarization techniques in student data.
17. Demonstrate the techniques to handle the imbalanced data sets.

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Python Programming using problem solving Approach by Reema Thareja- Oxford UniversityHigher Education Oxford University Press; First edition (10 June 2017)- ISBN-10:0199480173.
[2] John M. Sewart- “Python for Scientist”- Cambridge Universities Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Robert Sedgewick- Kevin Wayne- Robert Dondero- “Introduction to Programming in Python” Pearson.
[2] Mrak Litz- “ Learning Python”-O’ Reilly.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA: 50%

ESE: 50%

BECO191AN - INSTITUTIONS AND INFORMAL ECONOMY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The primary aim of this course is to introduce students to the concept of institutions and the informal economy in a global context. The discourse examines the informal economy through the lens of institutional economics. The aim is to acquaint students to significant discourses and issues in policy design and intervention.

Course Objectives

This course will:

  • introduce students to the institutions and institutional change through major concepts in institutional economics;
  • discuss the informal economy through concepts, theory, and measurement;
  • examine the linkages of formal and informal economy;
  • train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss these complex ideas.

Learning Outcome

CO1: · Introduce students to the environment, industry and economy linkage; and Discuss the economics of resource use;

CO2: Examine the economics of Environmental Quality; and Discuss the vision towards green industrialization

CO3: To understand the key challenges towards acceleration of greening SMEs and To understand the interlinkages between green industry, trade and global supply chain

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Institutions and Institutional Change
 

Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic Performance; Informal Constraints; Formal Constraints; The Path of Institutional Change

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Elements of Institutional Economics
 

Contracts and Property Rights: the Concepts of Exchange and Property, Critique of the Utilitarian Calculus; Transaction Costs, Bargaining Power; Markets as Institutions; Firms and Markets

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Informality: Concepts, Theory and Measurement
 

Bureaucratic Form and the Informal Economy; Formal and Informal Enterprises: Concepts, Definition, and Measurement Issues; Linking the Formal and Informal Economy.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:13
Empirical Studies in Institutional Change and Informality
 

CASE STUDIES: The Impact of Regulation on Growth and Informality: Cross-Country Evidence; Blocking Human Potential: How Formal Policies Block the Economy in the Maputo Corridor; Enforcement and Compliance in Lima’s Street Markets: The Origins and Consequences of Policy Incoherence towards Informal Traders

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Alston, L. J., Eggertsson, T., & North, D. C. (Eds.). (1996). Empirical Studies in Institutional Change. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  2. Guha-Khasnobis, B., Kanbur, R., &Ostrom, E. (Eds.). (2006). Linking the Formal and Informal Economy: Concepts and Policies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  3. Misztal, B. (2002). Informality: Social theory and Contemporary Practice. Routledge.
  4. North, D. (1990). Institutions, Economic Theory and Economic Performance . Institutions, Institutional Change and Economic performance. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Arias, O., Fajnzylber, P., Maloney, W., Mason, A., Perry, G., & Saavedra-Chanduvi, J. (2007). Informality: Exit and Exclusion. Washington: The World Bank.
  2. Harriss, J. (2006). Power Matters: Essays on Institutions, Politics, and Society in India. New York: Oxford University Press.
  3. Mehta, P. B., &Kapur, D. (2005). Public Institutions in India: Performance and Design. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  4. Nayyar, D. (Ed.). (2002). Governing Globalization: Issues and Institutions. Oxford University Press.
  5. Oviedo, A. M. (2009). Economic Informality: Causes, Costs, and Policies: A Literature Survey of International Experience. Country Economic Memorandum (CEM).
Evaluation Pattern

 

Mid Semester Examination: Group/Individual Assignment (45 Marks)

End Semester Examination: Group/Individual Assignment (50 Marks)

Class Attendance/Participation (5 Marks)

BECO191BN - ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:95
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the prominent debates in the economics of corruption. The course discusses how corruption acts as a constraint on economic growth using the theoretical constructs in Political Economy. It allows students to delve into the causes and consequences of corruption. In particular, the course will examine how corruption affects the emerging economies.

Course Objectives

This course will: consider some of the seminal papers on the economics of corruption acquaint students to significant debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption analyse corruption in emerging economies through various case studies discuss issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing corruption as erosion of trust and abuse of power train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss complex ideas.

Learning Outcome

CO1: ? consider some of the seminal papers on the economics of corruption ? acquaint students to significant debates about transparency, competition and privatization and its relevance to corruption

CO2: ? analyse corruption in emerging economies through various case studies ? discuss issues from various perspectives, such as, viewing corruption as erosion of trust and abuse of power

CO3: ? train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss complex ideas.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption, Poor Governance and Institutional Structure
 

Causes and Consequences of Corruption: What do we know from a cross-section of countries?, Democratic Institutions and Corruption: Incentives and Constraints in Politics, Bargaining for Bribes: the Role of Institutions

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Corruption and the Private Sector
 

The Privatization of Rent-Generating Industries and Corruption; Corruption in Private Sector, Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Tackling Corruption
 

Corruption and Policy Reform; Anti-Corruption Authorities: An Effective Tool to Curb Corruption? Corruption and Competition: Fair Markets as an Anticorruption Device

Text Books And Reference Books:

·         Auriol, E., & Straub, S. (2011). Privatization of Rent-generating Industries and Corruption. In S. Rose-Ackerman & T. Søreide, (Eds.). International Handbook on the Economics of Corruption, (Vol. 2). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Pub.

·         Burger, E. S., & Holland, M. S. (2006). Why the private sector is likely to lead the next stage in the global fight against corruption. Fordham International Law Journal, 30, 45.

·         Cartier-Bresson, J. (2000). Economics of corruption. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. The OECD Observer, (220), 25.

·         Jain, A. K. (2001). Corruption: A Review. Journal of Economic Surveys, 15(1), 71-121.

·         Jain, A. K. (Ed.). (2012). Economics of Corruption (Vol. 65). Springer Science & Business Media.

·         Meschi, P. X. (2009). Government Corruption and Foreign Stakes in International Joint Ventures in Emerging Economies. Asia Pacific Journal of Management, 26(2), 241-261.

·         Meyer, K. E., Estrin, S., Bhaumik, S. K., & Peng, M. W. (2009). Institutions, Resources, and Entry Strategies in Emerging Economies. Strategic Management Journal, 30(1), 61-80.

·         Nowakowski, K. (2010). Corruption in Private Sector.Economics and Law, 6(1), 345-360.

·         

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Rose-Ackerman, S. (1975). The Economics of Corruption. Journal of Public Economics, 4(2), 187- 203.

·         Uhlenbruck, K., Rodriguez, P., Doh, J., & Eden, L. (2006). The Impact of Corruption on Entry Strategy: Evidence from Telecommunication Projects in Emerging Economies. Organization Science, 17(3), 402-414.

 

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern Course title

MSE (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

The Economics of Corruption

45%

50%

BPSY191AN - SCIENCE OF WELLNESS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description

This course heralds the emergence of a new field of science that endeavours to understand how individuals and societies thrive and

flourish, and how this new knowledge can be applied to foster happiness, health and fulfillment. Taking a dynamic, cross-disciplinary approach, the

course explores the most promising routes to well-being, derived from the latest research in psychology, neuroscience, economics, and the effects of

our natural environment. The course provides an overview of the latest insights and strategies for enhancing our individual well-being, or the well-being of the communities in

which we live and work.

Course Objectives:

1. Understand the evolution and development of health and well-being

2. Develop a holistic approach to living life well.

3. Create optimal programs for individuals and populations.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Ability to analyze various perspectives from the latest research in psychology, neuroscience, economics, and the effects of our natural environment on well being

CO2: Integration of various aspects to have a holistic perspective on wellbeing

CO3: Ability to design interventions to enhance positive mental health in individuals and populations

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Well-Being
 

Well being as a concept, happiness and subjective well-being, Expanding the repertoire of positive emotions: The broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions; Relationship with reality and its role in the well-being of young adults; Increasing happiness in life, Positive mental health in individuals and populations.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Well-being across life-span
 

Living well at every stage of life: Resilience in childhood, positive youth development, life tasks of adulthood and successful aging; Role of meaningful relationships:infant attachment, adult attachment, love and flourishing relationships; Seeing the future through self efficacy and optimism; Role of Self efficacy in life arenas, learned optimism.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Socio-cultural and Economic Considerations
 

The relevance of subjective well-being to social policies: optimal experience and tailored intervention; The social context of well-being; Does money buy happiness?; A well-being manifesto for a flourishing society.

Text Books And Reference Books:
  • Coan, R. W. (1977). Hero, artist, sage, or saint? A survey of what is variously called mental health, normality, maturity, self-actualization, and human fulfillment. New York: Columbia University Press.
  • Boniwell, I. (2012). Positive Psychology In a Nutshell: The Science of Happiness (3rdedition). London: Mc Graw Hill.
  • Bradburn, N. M. (1969). The structure of psychological well-being. Chicago, IL:Aldine.
Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  • Felicia A. Huppert, Nick Baylis, and Barry Keverne (2005). The Science of Well- Being. Oxford University Press.
  • Synder,C.R., & Lopez, S.J. (2007). Positive Psychology. New Delhi: Sage Publishing House.
Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

CIA Evaluation pattern

 

Individual

Assignment

lab work and report

writing

Group Assignment/

field work 

Exhibition/ case study / activity

 

Test/quiz

Attendance

Total

 

20

20

20

15

20

5

100

BPSY191BN - ADVERTISEMENT PSYCHOLOGY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Advertisement psychology is a branch of psychology which studies the pattern of responses by the human system to advertisement stimuli. Advertising is the art of influencing human behaviors to buy certain products. Recently  advertisers are discovering the need to know the facts which psychology can give about what attracts attention, what sticks in memory, what gives a pleasant impression, what persuades and what leads to the act of purchase. The field helps marketers and copyrighters to prepare effective advertisements.

 

Course Objectives

At the end of the course, students will be able to: 

1.      Understand the historical and scientific origin and development of the field.

2.      Learn the cognitive, affective and behavioural responses to the advertisement stimuli.

       3.      Develop the skills to evaluate effectiveness of advertisements from psychological perspectives.

Learning Outcome

1: Apply the psychological perspectives of advertisements in the real-life setting.

2: Integrate different domains such as cognitive, affective and behavioral responses in the field of advertisement.

3: Develop the ability to make applications based on understanding of marketing strategies.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Unit I: Introduction to advertisement psychology
 

Introduction to advertisements; its objectives and importance;

Types and forms of advertising;

Effects of advertisements - a psychological perspective;

Classic and contemporary approaches of classifying advertisement effectiveness.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Unit II: Cognitive processing of advertisements
 

Influence of advertisements on buying behaviors;

Dynamics of Attention, Comprehension, Reasoning for advertisements;

Attitudes and attitude changes with the influence of advertisements;

Principles of persuasion and attitude change;

Achieving advertisement compliance without changing attitude.   

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Unit III: International Advertising and Creating Brand
 

Emergence of International Advertising;

Advertising in Multicultural Environment;

Ethics in Advertising;

Integrated marketing communication and marketing mix.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Linda, F. Alwitt& Andrew, A. Mitchell. (1985).Psychological Processes and Advertising

Effects: Theory, Research, and Applications. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Hillsdale, NJ. London.

Rolloph, M.E. & Miller, G.R. (Eds) (1980).Persuasion: New Directions in Theory and

Research.Sage. N.Y.

Eddie. M. Clark, Timothy.C. Brock,& David W. Stewart. (1994).Attention, Attitude and

Affect in Response to Advertising. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Hillsdale, NJ.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Fennis, B. M., & Stroebe, W. (2015). The Psychology of Advertising. New York: Psychology    

Press.

Andrew,A. Mitchell. (1993).Advertising Exposure, Memory and Choice.Lawrence Erlbaum

Associates. Hillsdale, NJ.

Evaluation Pattern

Reflective Assignment

Presentation

Module Development

Attendance

Total

30

30

35

5

100

ENG191AN - INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course ‘Introduction to Film Studies’ aims at introducing students to the cinema, important trends and genres in world cinema, along with key concepts in film studies. It aims to make participants familiar with some major international cinematic figures and films. It aids in the basic understanding of the field, its vast history, and its role in society. Students receive the chance to enhance the skills required to study Films with reference to art and society. It develops the students’ critical thinking ability that is required for analyzing, criticizing,  and creating quality films.

Course Objectives:

  • Introduces to the theories, methods, and concerns of film and media studies as a discipline, preparing the students for further work in the field. 

  • Teaches the specific aspects of film style and narrative form through analysis of scenes from the films screened each week and from a range of outside examples. 

  • Equips the students with historical, cultural, and theoretical topics relevant to the films. 

  • Teaches the language of cinema.

  • Trains the students to critically analyze the content.

  • Learns to communicate effectively.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the relationship between film form and aesthetic effect through both film analysis and the creation of motion pictures.

CO2: Employ the theories, methods and the language of cinema and relate to culture, history, and aesthetics.

CO3: Conduct film research and compose cogent, persuasive, and valid essays about film.

CO4: Investigate, identify and utilize major methods of film analysis.

CO5: Critically analyse, appreciate, and interpret significant works of art.

CO6: Develop strong communication skills.

CO7: Understand the making of cinema and lays the foundation for the making of a film.

CO8: Create quality content and acquire skills of Film making.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 
  • What is an Art?

  • Art as an Entertainment

  • Evolution of cinema

  •  Impact of theatre and Folk arts

  •  Industrial technological, aesthetic, and  cultural development in cinema

  •  Establishment of the Film industry and audience

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Language of Cinema
 
  • What is cinema? Why do we watch films?

  • Language of Film- cut, focus, frame, fade, close-up

  • Genres

  • Images, symbols, colours, narration, gestures, and expression

  • Role of individuals in shaping a cinema

  • Film Production

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Film Criticism
 
  • Difference between film analysis and criticism

  • From play to picture- a transformation of expressions into motions

  • Good cinema and bad cinema-criteria of assessment

  • Believe the unbelievable- cinemas that brought the audience to believe nonexistent elements

  • Books, stories, and the songs-the backbone of a successful screenplay

  • Content-the hero of a movie

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Evolution of New Forms
 
  • Motion picture

  • Feature film

  • Short film

  • Art movie

  • Documentary

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Cinematography
 
  • Innovation in cinematography

  • Sound and Lights- the lifeline of a movie

  • VFX, CG, and SFX

  • Cinematic techniques

Text Books And Reference Books:
  1. Andre Bazin: The Evolution of the Language of Cinema C.S. Venkitsweran, Swayamvaram: Classic Prophecies in Film and Philosophy ed. K Gopinathan

  2.  Satyajit Ray: What is Wrong with Indian Films 

  3. Susan Hayward: Cinema Studies: The Key Concepts

  4.  Ronald Abramson “ Structure and Meaning in Cinema in Movies and Methods Ed. Bill Nichols 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
  1. Film Art: An Introduction by David Bordwell & Kristin Thomson 

  2. How to Read a Film by James Monaco

  3. Understanding Movies by Louis Giannetti 

  4. Filmmaker’s Handbook by Steven Ascher & Edward Pincus 

  5. Grammar of the Shot by Roy Thompson & Christopher J. Bowen

  6.  Grammar of the Editing by Roy Thompson & Christopher J. Bowen 

  7. History of Narrative Film by David A. Cook

Evaluation Pattern

 

S.No

Assessment (Nature of CIAs)

Weightage 

1

CIA 1: Presentation

30

2

CIA 2: Analysis of Content/ Film Criticism

30

3

CIA 3: Content Writing/ Content Creation

30

4

Class Participation

05

5

Attendance 

05

 

Total

100

ENG191BN - DIGITAL HUMANITIES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description:

 

This course is designed to introduce the young students to the emerging field of Digital Humanities and its wide array of scope, research and academic engagements in the field of Arts and Humanities through incorporation of examples and case studies. Digitalisation is a product of the modern mechanised society; it has come to be accepted as an indispensable part of our lives today. Its use in the field of Humanities is a very recent development, with major contributions to documentation, preservation and ushering in a multidimensional interdisciplinary approach to our study, for sources ranging from audio-visual nature to textual work.

 

Course Objectives:

 

  1.  The students will be acquainted to many existing arguments in the area of Digital Humanities in the last few decades while examining the aid of digital tools in literary and cultural studies.
  2. The students will learn to create a sample of their own by replicating any existing digital artifact.
  3. The students will be able to identify Digital Humanities as an interdisciplinary field of study through case studies and comparative analysis.

 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Learn to document, preserve and catalogue any content

CO2: Understand digital as a cite of knowledge production and preservation

CO3: Treat audio-visual sources as necessary tools for research study

CO4: Efficient use of machine/digital in day-to-day life

CO5: Acknowledge Digital Humanities as a field of immense potential for generating information

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction: Digital Humanities
 

1.1 Digital Humanities: From inception to the present

1.2 Theorists and Major Thinkers

1.3 Digital Tools in Humanities and Audio-Visual Culture

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Archiving in Digital Humanities
 

2.1 Preservation: Art and Culture

2.2 Preservation: Literature and Language

2.3 Preservation: Documentation as Knowledge Production

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Digital Humanities: Case Studies
 

3.1 Textual Adaptation: From Manuscripts to Visual Text

3.2 Transcreation: Folk to Popular Culture

3.3 Machine Learning: Machine Translation, Subtitling, SEO, Text-o-Speech

Text Books And Reference Books:

Dan Cohen and Roy Rosenzweig (2005). Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web. University of Pennsylvania Press.

James Gleick (2011). The Information: A History, A Theory, A Flood. Pantheon.

Matthew Gold (2013). Debates in the Digital Humanities. University of Minnesota Press.

Ramsay, Stephen (2011). Reading Machines: Toward an Algorithmic Criticism. University of Illinois Press.

Susan Schreibman, Ray Siemens, and John Unsworth (eds.) (2004). A Companion to Digital Humanities. Oxford.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Cohen, Daniel J., et al. “Interchange: The Promise of Digital History.” The Journal of American History, vol. 95, no. 2, 2008, pp. 452–491. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/25095630. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021.

EARHART, AMY E. “Can We Trust the University?: Digital Humanities Collaborations with Historically Exploited Cultural Communities.” Bodies of Information: Intersectional Feminism and the Digital Humanities, edited by Elizabeth Losh and Jacqueline Wernimont, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2018, pp. 369–390. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctv9hj9r9.23. Accessed 8 Aug. 2021.

Huggett, Jeremy. “Core or Periphery? Digital Humanities from an Archaeological Perspective.” Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, vol. 37, no. 3 (141), 2012, pp. 86–105. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/41636599. Accessed 9 Aug. 2021.

KIRSCHENBAUM, MATTHEW. “What Is Digital Humanities and What’s It Doing in English Departments?” Debates in the Digital Humanities, edited by Matthew K. Gold, NED - New edition ed., University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2012, pp. 3–11. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttv8hq.4. Accessed 11 Aug. 2021.

Lindquist, Thea, et al. “Advancing Digital Humanities at CU-Boulder through Evidence-Based Service Design.” Laying the Foundation: Digital Humanities in Academic Libraries, edited by John W. White and Heather Gilbert, vol. 7, Purdue University Press, West Lafayette, Indiana, 2016, pp. 127–148. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt163t7kq.11. Accessed 9 Aug. 2021.

LOSH, ELIZABETH, et al. “Putting the Human Back into the Digital Humanities: Feminism, Generosity, and Mess.” Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016, edited by Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2016, pp. 92–103. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctt1cn6thb.13. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021.

McPherson, Tara. “Introduction: Media Studies and the Digital Humanities.” Cinema Journal, vol. 48, no. 2, 2009, pp. 119–123. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/20484452. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021.

ROBERTSON, STEPHEN. “The Differences between Digital Humanities and Digital History.” Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016, edited by Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2016, pp. 289–307. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctt1cn6thb.28. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021.

RUBERG, BONNIE, et al. “Toward a Queer Digital Humanities.” Bodies of Information: Intersectional Feminism and the Digital Humanities, edited by Elizabeth Losh and Jacqueline Wernimont, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2018, pp. 108–128. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctv9hj9r9.11. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021.

Sharpe, Celeste Tu´ò´ng Vy, and Timothy B. Powell. “Making Digital Humanities Tools More Culturally Specific and More Culturally Sensitive.” Teaching with Digital Humanities: Tools and Methods for Nineteenth-Century American Literature, edited by Jennifer Travis and Jessica DeSpain, University of Illinois Press, Urbana, Chicago; Springfield, 2018, pp. 167–184. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctv8bt13m.16. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021.

Tolbert, Jeffrey A., and Eric D. M. Johnson. “Digital Folkloristics: Text, Ethnography, and Interdisciplinarity.” Western Folklore, vol. 78, no. 4, 2019, pp. 327–356. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/26864167. Accessed 8 Aug. 2021.

Viscomi, Joseph. “Digital Facsimiles: Reading the William Blake Archive.” Computers and the Humanities, vol. 36, no. 1, 2002, pp. 27–48. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/30204695. Accessed 8 Aug. 2021.

WARD, MEGAN, and ADRIAN S. WISNICKI. “The Archive after Theory.” Debates in the Digital Humanities 2019, edited by Matthew K. Gold and Lauren F. Klein, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis; London, 2019, pp. 200–206. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctvg251hk.21. Accessed 10 Aug. 2021.

 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I- Blog Writing       

CIA II- Book History: Archival Report        

CIA III- Project

BBS291AN - APPLIED ETHICS-A MULTICULTURAL APPROACH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

 

Course Description: Ethics or moral philosophy is a branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct. While it is easy to argue that what is right and wrong should be the same across all cultures, surprisingly it is not. This course is an attempt to enable students understand that moral principles though expected to be universal, have deep rooted connotations that make them unique in each culture.

 

Learning Objectives: On completing the course, students will be able to:

·         Appreciate multicultural perspectives of ethics

 

·         Make informed decisions on issues which involve ethical dilemma    

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Students will be equipped with Ethical decision making

CO2: Students will be equipped with Global mindedness

CO3: Students will be equipped with Critical thinking

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Human Rights
 

United nations universal declaration of human rights, articles of the declaration, women’s rights as human rights, political implications, practical approaches, women’s rights as political and civil rights, democracy as a universal value, the Indian experience, democracy and economic development, functions of democracy, universality of values.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Racial and Ethnic Discrimination
 

Philosophical and social implications of Race, scientific literacy about race, race and social construction, social justice implications, collective responsibility and multiple racial, the over lapping characteristics approach defining a community, two general norms to assess collective responsibility ethnic and cultural identities, the color blind principle, color blind and color conscious policies, the responsibility criterion.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Gender roles and morality
 

Introduction, kinds of social construction, construction of ides, concepts and objects, Gender and social construction, intrinsic inclinations, explaining gender and sexual diversity, domestic violence against women and autonomy.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:5
Abortion
 

Moral and legal status, defining human, moral community, right to life, the problem of coerced abortion in China and the morality of abortion in Japan (case studies)

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Euthanasia
 

Active and passive euthanasia, intentional termination of life, risks and objections to the institutionalization of euthanasia, conceptualizing euthanasia in the context of the US, Netherlands and Germany, a critique on such practices.

Text Books And Reference Books:

May L &Delston J B (2016) Applied Ethics: A multicultural approach, Routledge

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Lawrence and Weber, (2015). Business and Society, Tata McGraw-Hill.

Prakash Pillappa, (2015). Civic Sense, Excel Books.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: Group discussion for 20 marks

Mid Semester exam: Exhibition for 50 marks

CIA 3: Group presentations 20 marks

End Semester exam: Written exam and Movie review for 50 marks

ESE: Section A: 5X5 =25 marks

          Movie review (Group work) =25 marks

BBS291BN - GLOBAL LEADERSHIP AND CULTURE (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: Leadership and the ability to lead is an important concept within our world of work. Though It has been studied and analysed for centuries there is no doubt that it is a complex subject. This challenge is amplified when we look at multi-cultural environments and global leadership. In recent years there has been an increasing amount of research into the role of cross-cultural leadership. However, the operationalization of global leadership differs widely from culture to culture. In Indonesia describing your past successes is an important part of motivating your team. In Japan this would be seen as bragging and be strictly frowned upon. It is evident that successful global leadership behaviours vary widely. This course is an attempt in helping students understand such diversities and help them cultivate global leadership skills.

 Learning Objectives:  On completing the course, students will be able to:

 

·       Understand the complications involved in leadership across cultures

 

·       Appreciate the need to lead people differently in different cultures

·       Inculcate decision making

Learning Outcome

CO1: Students will be equipped with Global leadership skills

CO2: Students will be equipped with Empathy towards critical issues that bother leaders at global level

CO3: Students will be equipped with Decision making skills in cross cultural contexts

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Introduction
 

Culture, systems approach to culture, key cultural terminology, cultural understanding and sensitivity, global transformation.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Global leaders and intercultural communication
 

Introduction, intercultural communication process, models, non verbal communication, guidelines.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Global leaders learning in response to change
 

Introduction, aspects of organizational learning, management mindsets and learning, individual learning

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Women leaders in global business
 

Current status of women global leaders, cultural stereotypes, balancing work and family, glass ceiling, company initiatives to break glass ceiling, women and overseas assignments

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Leadership skills to make globalization work
 

Lessons from CEOs, description of competencies, framework

Text Books And Reference Books:

Abramson N R & Moran R T (2016) Managing cultural differences-Global leadership for 21st century: Routledge

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading
Kaitholil,GeorgeMake leadership your target, Bombay Better Yourself Books 
Sethi & Rajiv, Tips for effective leadership, Beacon books

Marshal & Tom, Understanding leadership, Sovereign World Ltd

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1: Class Test for 25 marks

Mid Semester exam: Written exam for 50 marks

CIA 3: Presentation/Group discussion 25 marks

End-of Semester exam: Written exam for 50 marks

BBS291CN - COURTESY AND ETIQUETTES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course examines the relationship between language use, enormous variety of language experiences, belief systems, and behavioral patterns. On the other hand Etiquette helps smooth the path of our daily activities, whether it's meeting others in our daily interactions talking to someone on the phone, offering condolences properly or understanding how to talk to colleagues at a business conference. Being aware of the beliefs attitudes and etiquettes of individuals will help one to become more tolerant from one individual to the next and from one group to the next.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Students will practice critical thoughts in comprehending the notion of culture, its relationship with language, Etiquettes and the key concepts of cross ?cultural Communication

CO2: Students will be able to apply proper courtesy in different situations

CO3: Students will be able to understand the change that constantly undergoes in personal and social use.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction: Greetings and Courtesy
 

Greeting a person, - the different ways of greeting, saying good bye to another person, Thank You, Excuse me, Introduction to oneself, Yawning, Coughing, Interrupting, Offering help, refusing help, requesting privacy, speaking in a low voice, waiting for help, accepting or declining an invitation, expressing admiration, The key principles of common courtesy, professional manners and the Golden Rule as they are practiced in the workplace environment, Classroom Etiquette and Student Behavior Guidelines, The guidelines for maintaining a civil classroom environment

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Manners and civility
 

Introduction to adjusting to a new culture, Theories on second language and culture acquisition, communication, National Standards, Culture acquisition through family and Homestays, Distinguish among the three main forms of communication in the workplace: verbal, nonverbal, and virtual. Proper and improper uses of workplace communication, the potential repercussions of poor listening in the workplace, the proper and improper use of technology in the workplace

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Etiquette
 

Why Etiquette Matters, Identify common cultural differences, taboos, and customs that may be practiced in the workplace, Discuss ways to navigate and honor cultural differences in the workplace, Describe how to express an appropriate awareness of international and other customs. The Common Courtesies of Life, Polite Conversation, Telephone Etiquette, Correspondence, Basic Table Manners, Overnight Guests, Wedding Etiquette, Moments of Sorrow, Appropriate Behavior for Children, Gift Giving Guidelines.

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:8
Business Etiquette
 

Introduction to Modern Etiquette, The Rules of the Workplace, Meetings and Introductions, Conversation and Listening Skills, Telephone/Cell Phone, Texting, Emailing and Internet Etiquette, Etiquette in Public Places, Employment/Volunteer Etiquette, Dining Etiquette, Social Gathering Etiquette (Guest and Host/Hostess), School Etiquette, Confidence Without Arrogance

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:7
Personal and professional Presentation
 

Restaurant Etiquette, Cellphone Etiquette, Voice Mail Etiquette, Air Travel Etiquette, Cocktail Party Etiquette, Office Gossip Etiquette, Business Dress Etiquette, Email Etiquette, Social Media Etiquette, Job Interview Etiquette, International Etiquette

Text Books And Reference Books:

Lecture/Discussion and Videos

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

NA

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1-30 Marks

CIA 2-30 Marks

CIA 3-30 Marks

Attendance-5 Marks

Class Participation- 5 Marks

BDA221N - COMMUNICATIVE ENGLISH (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

ENGlogue is an English language course book for the students of first year of undergraduate courses studying in Christ University. The book that covers both Semesters I and II is built around fourteen contemporary themes, with each unit including two interesting and engaging reading texts. The texts are meant to trigger not just the desired language-learning behaviors but also to engage the students in thinking about various pertinent issues concerning the world around them. Each unit also includes teaching and tasks based on vocabulary, reading, writing and speaking. The overall objective of the book is to provide students with hands-on learning of language skills, equipping them not only for their immediate academic needs but also for their future professional careers.

  • To help learners classify ideologies and be able to express the same
  •  To expose learners to visual texts and its reading formulas
  • To help learners develop a taste to appreciate works of literature through the organization of language
  • To help develop critical thinking
  • To help learners appreciate literature and the language nuances that enhances its literary values
  • To help learners understand the relationship between the world around them and the text/literature
  • To help learners negotiate with content and infer meaning contextually
  • To help learners understand logical sequencing of content and process information
  • To help improve their communication skills for larger academic purposes and vocational purposes
  • To enable learners to learn the contextual use of words and the generic meaning
  • To enable learners to listen to audio content and infer contextual meaning
  • To enable learners to be able to speak for various purposes and occasions using context specific language and expression.
  •  To enable learners to develop the ability to write for various purposes using suitable and precise language.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand how to engage with texts from various countries, historical, cultural specificities and politics

CO2: Understand and develop the ability to reflect upon and comment on texts with various themes

CO3: Develop an analytical and critical bent of mind to compare and analyze the various literature they read and discuss in class.

CO4: Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes.

CO5: Develop the ability to communicate both orally and in writing for various purposes.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Beauty
 
  1. The Happy Prince By Oscar Wilde
  2. Sonnet 18 by Shakespeare
Unit-1
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Common errors- subject-verb agreement, punctuation, tense errors

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Travel
 
  1. Why We Travel- Pico Iyer
  2. What Solo Travel Has Taught Me About the World and Myself - ShivyaNath
Unit-2
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Sentence fragments, dangling modifiers, faulty parallelism

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Environment
 
  1. Thinking Like a Mountain- Aldo Leopold
  2. On Cutting a Tree-  Gieve Patel

 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Note taking

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Paragraph writing

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:6
Religion
 
  1. Violence in the name of God is Violence against God - Rev Dr Tveit
  2. Leave this Chanting and Singing and Telling of Beads- Rabindra Nath Tagore

 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Newspaper report

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:6
Crime
 
  1. The Story of B24 by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  2.  Aarushi Murder case
Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Health and Fitness
 
  1. My Story- Nicole DeFreece
  2. Why You Should Never Aim for Six Packs- Kinnari Jariwala
Unit-6
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Essay writing

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Sports
 
  1. Sir Ranjth Singh- Sourav Ganguly
  2. Casey at the Bat- Ernest Lawrence Thayer

 

Unit-7
Teaching Hours:6
Language
 

Paraphrasing and interpretation skills

Unit-8
Teaching Hours:3
Visual Text
 

Before the Flood

Text Books And Reference Books:

ENGlogue 1

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Additional material as per teacher manual will be provided by the teachers.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA 1=20

CIA 2=50

CIA 3= 20

ESE= 50 marks online and 50 marks written exam

BDA231N - DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims at enabling the students to know various concepts and principles of differential

calculus and its applications. Sound knowledge of calculus is essential for the students of

mathematics for the better perceptions of the subject and its development.

Learning Outcome

CO1: understand and use the notion of Derivative of the function of one variable.

CO2: demonstrate a working knowledge of vectors and vector functions.

CO3: determine partial derivatives of the functions of two or more variables.

CO4: illustrate the computational skills in finding the directional derivatives- Gradient vectors and differentials.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Functions of single variable
 

Definition of the limit of a function (ε-δ) form – Continuity- Uniform Continuity – Types of discontinuities – Properties of continuous functions on a closed interval – Differentiability.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Mean Value Theorems
 

Mean Value Theorems: Rolle’s theorem – Lagrange’s and Cauchy’s First Mean Value Theorems – Taylor’s theorem (Lagrange’s form and Cauchy’s forms of remainder) –Maclaurin’s theorem and expansions - Indeterminate forms. Maxima and Minima.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:9
Successive and Partial Differentiation
 

Successive differentiation – nth derivatives of functions – Leibnitz theorem and its applications – Partial differentiation –First and higher-order derivatives – Differentiation of homogeneous Functions. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Functions of two variables
 

Partial derivatives- Total derivative- Lagrange’s multipliers for two variables- Euler’s theorem – Taylor’s theorem for two variables - Maxima and Minima of functions of two variables.

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:9
Tracing of curve
 

Tangents and Normal- Curvature- Asymptotes- Singular points- Tracing of curves (Parametric representation of curves and tracing of parametric curves- Polar coordinates and tracing of curves in polar coordinates).  

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] G.B. Thomas- M. D. Weir and J. Hass- Thomas Calculus- 14th ed.- Pearson Education India- 2018

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] F. Ayres and E. Mendelson- Schaum's Outline of Calculus- 10th ed. USA: Mc. Graw Hill.- 2015.

[2] J. Stewart- Single Variable Essential Calculus: Early Transcendentals- 2nd ed.: Belmont- USA: Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning.- 2013.

[3] M. Spivak- Calculus- 4th ed.- Cambridge University Press- 2008.

[4] T.M. Apostol- Calculus- Vol-II- Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.- 2011.linear

Evaluation Pattern

CIA -50%

ESE- 50%

BDA232N - RANDOM VARIABLES AND PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTIONS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is designed to teach the basic concepts of random variables and its generation functions. It also gives a brief idea about standard probability distributions and how they are applied in real time situations. The course will enable the students to understand the properties and applications of various probability functions. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate the random variables, its generating functions and infer its expectation.

CO2: Demonstrate various discrete and continuous distributions and their usage.

CO3: Understand and apply laws of large numbers and Central Limit Theorem.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Random variables
 

Definition- Discrete and continuous random variables- Probability Mass function and Probability density function- Distribution function and its properties. Two dimension random variables: Discrete and continuous type- Joint Density function- Marginal and conditional Probability Mass function and Probability Density function- independence of variables with illustration.  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Mathematical Expectation and Generating functions
 

Expectation of single and bivariate random variables and its properties. Moments and Cumulantsmoment generating function- cumulant generating function and characteristic function. Uniqueness and inversion theorems (without proof) along with applications- Conditional expectations. 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Discrete Probability distributions
 

Discrete distributions: Binomial- Poisson- geometric- negative binomial- Hypergeometric distributions along with their properties- limiting/approximation cases and applications.  

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:12
Continuous Probability distributions
 

Continuous distributions: Uniform- normal- exponential- Cauchy- beta and gamma distributions along with their properties- limiting/approximation cases and applications. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:12
Limiting Theorems
 

Chebyshev’s inequality- Week Law of Large numbers- Strong Law of Large numbers and their applications- Central Limit Theorem for i.i.d variates and its application- De-Moivre Laplace theorem.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Sheldon Ross- A First Course in Probability- 9th edition- Pearson Education- US-10th ed., 2019.
[2] Gupta S.C and Kapoor V.K- Fundamentals of Mathematical Statistics- Sultan Chand & SonsNew Delhi- 2017.  

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Mukhopadhyay P- Mathematical Statistics- Books and Allied (P) Ltd- Kolkata-3rd ed., 2018.
[2] Rohatgi V.K and Saleh E- An Introduction to Probability and Statistics- 3rd edition- John Wiley & Sons Inc.- New Jersey-3rd ed., 2015.
[3] Montgomery D.C and Runger G.C- Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers- Wiley India- New Delhi-9th ed., 2016.
[4] Mood A.M- Graybill F.A and Boes D.C- Introduction to the Theory of Statistics- McGraw HillNew Delhi-3rd ed., 2017. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA: 50%  

ESE: 50%

BDA233N - OPERATING SYSTEM (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to the concepts behind modern computer operating systems. Topics will include what an operating system does (and doesn't) do- system calls and interfaces- processesresource scheduling and management (of the CPU- memory- etc.)- Virtual memory. To acquire the fundamental knowledge of the operating system architecture and its components. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand the basic working process of an operating system.

CO2: Understand the importance of process and scheduling.

CO3: Understand the issues in synchronization and memory management.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:9
Introduction
 

Introduction Categories of Operating Systems- Computer-System Organization- Computer-System Architecture- Operating-System Structure- Operating-System Operations. System Structures Operating-System Services- User Operating-System Interface- System Calls- Types of System Calls- System Programs. Process Management Process Concept- Process Scheduling- Operations on Processes: process creation and termination - zombie and o

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:9
Scheduling and Synchronization
 

 CPU Scheduling- Basic Concepts- Scheduling Criteria- Scheduling Algorithms- Thread SchedulingMultiple-Processor Scheduling - The Critical-Section Problem - Peterson’s Solution - Synchronization Hardware - Semaphores - Classic problems of Synchronization - Multithreading models - threading issues.  

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Memory Management Strategies and Deadlocks
 

System Model- Deadlock Characterization- Methods for handling Deadlocks -Deadlock Prevention- Deadlock avoidance- Deadlock detection- Recovery from Deadlocks - SwappingContiguous Memory allocation- Paging- Structure of the Page Table- Segmentation

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:9
Virtual Memory Management
 

Demand Paging- Copy-on-Write- Page Replacement- page replacement algorithms- Allocation of frames- Thrashing.

File System:   File Concept- Access Methods- Directory and Disk Structure- File System Mounting- File SharingProtection

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:8
Implementing File Systems
 

 File System Structure- File System Implementation- Directory Implementation- allocation Methods- Free-space Management. 

Secondary Storage Structure:  Disk Structure- Disk Attachment- Disk Scheduling- Disk Management and Swap-Space Management. Case study

Text Books And Reference Books:

Silberschatz- P.B. Galvin and G. Gagne- Operating System Concepts.9th Edition- New Delhi: Wiley India- 2011. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

 Stalling William- Operating Systems: Internals and Design Principles. 7th Edition - Prentice Hall-2011.

Evaluation Pattern

CIA_50%

ESE_50%

BDA234N - DATA STRUCTURES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will introduce the concepts of Abstract data type (ADTs), linear data structures which include lists, stacks, and queues. The course covers various sorting, searching and hashing algorithms and applications of linear data structures. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Understand the need for Data Structures when building applications.

CO2: Design and develop algorithms using relevant data structure operations.

CO3: Appreciate the need for an optimized algorithm.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:11
Introduction
 

Introduction to data structures - Algorithms - Analysing algorithms - Complexity of algorithms-Growth of functions - Asymptotic Notations - Performance measurements - Arrays and Structures: Abstract Data Type- Dynamically Allocated Arrays- Structures- Unions- Polynomial Representation and Additions.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
Linear Data Structures ? List
 

Linear Lists: Abstract Data Types (ADTs) – List ADT – array-based implementation linked list implementation –singly-linked lists- circularly linked lists- doubly-linked lists – applications of lists –Polynomial Manipulation – All operations.(Insertion, Deletion, Merge, Traversal) 

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:12
Linear Data Structures ? Stacks, Queues
 

Stack ADT – Operations – Applications – Evaluating arithmetic expressions-Conversion of Infix to postfix expression – Queue ADT – Operations – Circular Queue- Priority Queue – deQueue – applications of queues. 

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:11
Searching, Sorting and Hashing Techniques
 

Searching- Linear Search – Binary Search. Sorting – Bubble sort – Selection sort – Insertion sort – Shell sort – Radix sort. Hashing- Hash Functions – Separate Chaining- Open Addressing – Rehashing – Extendible Hashing. 

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
Non-Linear Data Structures ? Trees
 

Tree ADT – tree traversals – Binary Tree ADT – expression trees – applications of trees binary search tree ADT –Threaded Binary Trees- AVL Trees – B-Tree -B+ Tree – Heap– Applications of heap.  

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:14
Non-Linear Data Structures -Graphs
 

Definition – Representation of Graph – Types of graph – Breadth-first traversal –Depth-first traversal – Topological Sort – Bi-connectivity – Cut vertex – Euler circuits-Applications of graphs.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Rance D. Necaise. “Data Structures and Algorithms Using Python” Hamilton Printing Company-2011.

[2] Thomas H. Coreman- Charles E. Leiserson and Ronald L. Rivest- “Introduction to Algorithms”- Printice Hall of India, 2001.  

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Aho- Hopcraft- Ullman- “The Design and Analysis of Computer Algorithms” Pearson Education- 2008.

[2] Horowitz- Sahni- Rajasekaran- Fundamentals of Computer Algorithms-Silicon Pr2nd Edition- November 2012. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-50%

ESE-50%

BDA251N - DATA STRUCTURES LAB (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:60
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:2

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course is designed to provide a practical exposure to data structures and its applications.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Acquire the knowledge to build the logic and develop solution for a problem statement.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:60
List of Programs
 

1. Implement creation, insertion, deletion, update in an array.

2. Implement concatenation of arrays , find the length of the arrays.

3. Implementation of Single Linked List performing the following operations (i)Creation (ii) insertion (iii) deletion (iv) traversal

4. Array implementation of Stacks.

5. Array Implementation of queues.

6. Implementation of Stack using Linked list.

7. Implementation of Queue using Linked list.

8. Implementation of linear search. 9. Implementation of Binary Search.

10. Implementation of Insertion sorting.

11. Implementation of selection sorting.

12. Implementation of merge sort.

13. Implementation of Sorting Algorithm - Separate chaining and Open Addressing Hashing Technique

14. Implementation of Binary Search Tree a. Create a binary search tree. b. Traverse the above binary search tree recursively in pre-order, post-order and in- order c. Count the number of nodes in the binary search tree. LIST

15. Write Python programs to create a tree and implement the following graph traversal algorithms a. Depth first search. b. Breadth first search.c 

Text Books And Reference Books:

[1] Rance D. Necaise. “Data Structures and Algorithms Using Python” Hamilton Printing Company-2011.

[2] Thomas H. Coreman- Charles E. Leiserson and Ronald L. Rivest- “Introduction to Algorithms”- Printice Hall of India, 2001. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

[1] Aho- Hopcraft- Ullman- “The Design and Analysis of Computer Algorithms” Pearson Education- 2008.

[2] Horowitz- Sahni- Rajasekaran- Fundamentals of Computer Algorithms-Silicon Pr2nd Edition- November 2012. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA-50%

ESE-50%

BDA252N - R PROGRAMMING AND STATISTICAL MODELLING LAB (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:90
No of Lecture Hours/Week:4
Max Marks:100
Credits:4

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course is used to provide an introduction to R, statistical language and environment. The course also covers the basics of R for statistical computation, exploratory analysis, and modeling.

Course Objective: To enable students to understand and develop programs in R environment.   

Learning Outcome

CO1: Demonstrate data handling in R.

CO2: Perform exploratory data analysis using R.

CO3: Perform statistical modelling using R.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction
 

Introduction to R-Installation of R- Getting Started with R interface- Entering Input-Evaluation. R objects- Numbers- Attributes- Creating Vectors-Mixing Objects Explicit Coercion- MatricesLists- Missing Values-Data Frames- Names- Reading and Writing Data into R- Introduction to read.table().  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Managing Data Frames
 

Managing Data Frames with dplyr package- Data Frames- dplyr package- dplyr grammarInstalling dplyr- functions –select-filter-arrange-rename-mutate-group by. Control StructuresFunctions and Debugging- If-else- for loops-Nested for loops-while loops- repeat Loops-next break.  

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Statistical Modelling
 

Statistical Modelling using R: Diagrammatic and graphical representation. Exploratory data analysis-generating random numbers-fitting of discrete and continuous distributions.  

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:60
List of Program
 

1. Creating vectors and performing operations on vectors.

2. Creating Matrices and performing operations on matrix.

3. Usage of select-filter-arrange-rename-mutate-group by functions.

4. Programming using control statements.

5. Diagrammatic and graphical representation.

6. Doing exploratory data analysis.

7. Correlation and Regression analysis

8. Generate random numbers from discrete distributions.

9. Generate random numbers from continuous distributions.

10-13. Fitting of discrete probability distribution.

14-15. Fitting of continuous probability distribution.  

Text Books And Reference Books:

1. W.N.Venables, D.M.Smith, An Introduction to R, R Core Team, 2018.
2. Maria Dolores Ugarte, Ana F. Militino, Alan T. Arnhold. Probability and Statistics with R -2nd Edition-CRC Press, 2016. 

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

1. John Verzani, simple R - Using R for Introductory Statistics-2nd Edition CRC Press- Taylor & Francis Group - 2018.
2. Bharti Motwani-Data Analytics with R- 1st Edition – Wiley-2019. 

Evaluation Pattern

CIA: 50%

ESE: 50%

BECO291BN - DESINGING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The course introduces the idea of sustainable development and how it forms an organizing principle for meeting the human development goals. The course discuss how sustainability goals can address the global challenges like inequality, poverty, environmental degradation, climate change, etc. The course will also provide an in-depth view of how sustainability can be linked to social development, economic development and environmental protection; and how an interplay of multiple factors is key for achieving the 2030 agenda for sustainable development goals.

This course is aimed at undergraduate students to introduce to them the idea of sustainable development and social/public policies within that context. The course discusses the challenges of sustainable development, and of designing policies for it, in a global setting. It examines the interplay of politics and economics, with emphasis on modes and instruments of producing public policy. This course will:

• acquaint students to significant discourses and issues in policy design and intervention with regards to sustainable development;

• help them understand how political ideology, interests and power influence economic actions, processes and planning at the macro level;

• through class discussions acquaint students to ideas agenda setting and policy dynamics in the context of sustainable development goals (SDGs);

• train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss complex ideas.

Learning Outcome

CO1: ? acquaint students to significant discourses and issues in policy design and intervention with regards to sustainable development ? help them understand how political ideology, interests and power influence economic actions, processes and planning at the macro level.

CO2: ? through class discussions acquaint students to ideas agenda setting and policy dynamics in the context of sustainable development goals (SDGs). ? train students to hone their writing and presentation skills to effectively discuss complex ideas.

CO3: ? appreciate the concept of development goals and the emergence of SDGs. ? understand the interplay between politics and economics and how that influences the decisions at state level;

CO4: ? identify and examine some the major themes in public policy intervention and measurement of SDGs; ? effectively communicate complex ideas through written and oral presentation.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:12
Institutional and Historical Background
 

The Historical Roots of the Field; Emergence of Schools of Public Policy; Sustainable Development Goals – the Concept

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Modes of Policy Analysis
 

Policy Analysis as Puzzle Solving; Policy Analysis as Critique; The Tools of Government in the Information Age;

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:18
Producing Public Policy: Process, Challenges and Constraints
 

Agenda Setting; Arguing, Bargaining and Getting Agreement; Reframing Problematic Policies; Challenges of achieving the SDGs in the context of: Economic Constraints on Public Policy; Political Feasibility: Interests and Power; and Institutional Constraints on Policy

Text Books And Reference Books:

Moran, M., Rein, M., & Goodin, R. E. (2006). The Oxford Handbook of Public Policy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Addison, T., Harper, C., Prowse, M., Shepherd, A., Armando Barrientos, with, Braunholtz- Speight, T., … Zohir, S. (2009). The Chronic Poverty Report 2008–09. Retrieved from https://www.odi.org/sites/odi.org.uk/files/odi-assets/publications-opinion- files/2566.pdf

Bellinger, W. K. (2007). The Economic Analysis of Public Policy. Routledge.

Griggs, D., Stafford-Smith, M., Gaffney, O., Rockström, J., Öhman, M. C., Shyamsundar, P., ... & Noble, I. (2013). Policy: Sustainable Development Goals for People and Planet. Nature, 495(7441), 305-307.

Hausman, D. M., & McPherson, M. S. (2006). Economic Analysis, Moral Philosophy, and Public Policy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Kates, R. W., Parris, T. M., &Leiserowitz, A. A. (2005). What is Sustainable Development? Goals, Indicators, Values, and Practice. Environment(Washington DC), 47(3), 8-21.

Mehta, A. K. (2002). Chronic Poverty in India: Overview Study. CPRC Working Paper 7.

Retrieved from http://www.chronicpoverty.org/uploads/publication_files/CRPC- IIPA_2.pdf

 

Sachs, J. D. (2012). From Millennium Development Goals to Sustainable Development Goals. The Lancet, 379(9832), 2206-2211.

Evaluation Pattern

Course title

MSE (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Attendance

DESIGNING POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

45%

50%

5%

BECO291CN - ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS AND ITS INTERLINKAGE WITH INDUSTRY (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

The primary aim of this course is to introduce students to the concept  of environmental economics, linkage between nature and economy, natural resource economics and Industrialisation and Its Impact on Environment. In the context of the interlinkage between environment concerns and industry, the course intends to raise awareness about the importance and feasibility of green industry approaches, green industrial policy and green recovery mechanism in the background of post COVID-19 crisis and 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

The goal  is to acquaint students with the scientific approach to the study of man and environment by bringing to life subject matter of the infant science of environmental economics emphasizing its connections with socio economic conditions. Real world examples and applications are used to make subjects interesting to students of this new discipline.

In addition to this, the goal is to provide participants with an understanding of green industrial policy, identify urgent actions and strategies to promote green industry and sustainable industrial development including cleaner and resource efficient production.

.Course Objectives

This course will:

·         Introduce students to the environment, industry and economy linkage;

·           Discuss the economics of resource use;

·         Examine the economics of Environmental Quality;

       Discuss the vision towards green industrialization

       To understand  the key challenges towards acceleration of greening SMEs

      To understand the interlinkages between green industry, trade and global supply chain

Learning Outcome

CO1: Have a practical knowledge and understanding of the environment, and its interlinkage with industry.

CO2: To understand the green strategies, its roles and its challenges in the context of industrialization.

CO3: To understand the application of environmental resources and policies in the day to day life.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT 1: Origins and scope of environmental economics
 

Defining the interlinkage between economics and environment , Origins and  scope of environmental economics , The first two laws of thermodynamics,defining environmental policies, strategies and their applications,

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:12
UNIT 2: Economics of Resource Use
 

Classification of Resource. Renewable and non-renewable Resources. Theories of Natural Resource Use, The Role of Time in Economics: Discounting.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
UNIT 3: Environmental Economics and Green Industrialization
 

Environmental Kuznets curve, Policy, Need for Green Industrial Development, Industry 4.0, Industrial Parks,  Green jobs and government policies in the context of green industrialization

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:13
UNIT 4: Interlinkages between green industrialization, global trade and global value chain
 

Definition and understanding of Global Value chain,  Green Industrialization and global trade, Challenges to adopt Green related products and services, Finance and Investment for green industrial development.

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

Field, B. C., & Field, M. K. (2017). Environmental economics an introduction. The McGraw-Hill.

Environmental Economics -An Integrated Approach -Philip E Graves

Bhattacharya, R. N. (Ed.). (2001). Environmental Economics: An Indian Perspective. Oxford University Press, USA.

Balsdon, E., & Kolstad, C. D. (1999). Environmental Economics. Oxford University Press.

Squires, G. (2012). Urban and environmental economics: An introduction. Routledge.

Altenburg, T., and Assmann. C. (Eds) (2017), Green Industrial Policy: Concept, Policies, Country Experiences. Geneva, Bonn: UN Environment; German Development Institute.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

OECD (2012),  Green Growth and Developing countries: A summary of Policy Makers

OECD (2012),  Green Growth and Developing Countries. OECD Consultation Draft.

Building Competitive green industries: The Climate and Clean Technology. Opportunity for Developing countries. World Bank Group. www. infodev.org.

UNIDO (2010), “A Greener Footprint for Industry-Opportunities and Challenges of Sustainable Industrial Development”.

Financing for SMEs in Sustainable Global Value Chains.

https://www.gpfi.org/sites/gpfi/files/documents/GVC%20paper_highres_0.pdf

UNEP (2016), Green Finance for Developing Countries, Needs, Concerns and Innovations.

https://www.cbd.int/financial/gcf/unep-greendeveloping2016.pdf

Evaluation Pattern

CIA I

CIA II

CIA III

Attendance

Total

30

30

30

10

100

BENG291BN - GLOBAL ETHICS FOR CONTEMPORARY SOCIETIES (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will introduce students to the major theoretical and applied debates as well as major moral puzzles and challenges in the field of global ethics. Ethics is gaining ground as an important humanities intervention in a fast-changing world.  

A course on ethics is often an added advantage for students as it helps them shape a  socially aware perspective of the social reality.  

Drawing on interdisciplinary perspectives and thematic issues in the fields of international politics, business, communications and law, the course will challenge students to reflect on major ethical theories and traditions as well as core problems such as corporate governance, global distributive justice, the ethics of making and sustaining peace, media ethics and legal dimensions of ethics.  

By combining the works of both classic and contemporary philosophers with contemporary applied global issues, students will be able to critically reflect on fundamental normative questions from an interdisciplinary perspective and reflect on the rights, responsibilities and challenges of ‘good global citizenship.

Learning Objectives: On completing the course, students will be able to 

● Open-mindedly consider different viewpoints in moral controversies.  

● Identify the strengths and weaknesses of different philosophical and popular arguments on the various topics.  

● Demonstrate understanding of the major moral philosophical approaches and techniques in moral reasoning.  

 ● Formulate and critically assess personal positions/convictions. 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Analyze various ethical dilemmas present in society and efficiently present them in form of classroom debates and discussions.

CO2: Demonstrate a clear understanding of various schools of thought in the domain of ethics through their assignments.

CO3: Appraise their views on various aspects of ethics and present them with clarity through multiple engagements in the classroom.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:5
Unit-1: Introduction
 

Global Ethics: Conceptual Definitions, Historical Origins & Present Challenges  Introduction to the course Ethics, Morals and Values Cultural Relativism vs  Universalism (case study)  

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Ethical Theories
 

Rationalist Ethical Theories; Contractualist ethics, Deontological Ethics, Utilitarian  Ethics, Discourse ethics, Alternatives to Ethical Rationalism Virtue Ethics Feminist &  Care Ethics Postmodernist Ethics  

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Applying Ethical Theories
 

Ethics of International Aid and Development: Humanitarian Aid in Conflict Zones  Global Distributive Justice and Global Poverty: Models for International Economic  Justice Ethics of War: Torture in Abu Ghraib (Case Study)

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Ethics of Making and Sustaining Peace
 

Rohingya Issues: Are humanitarian interventions justified? The case study of  Myanmar/Burma Global Environmental and Climate Ethics: Trade Agreements and  Global Environmental Ethics Global Business Ethics and Arms Trade: The Ethics of  Capitalism (Film Inside Job)

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:10
Ethics of International Law
 

Natural Resources Extraction from the Kimberley process towards universal  legislation (Movie: Blood Diamond), Global Journalism Ethics, Digital Media Ethics  and Whistleblowing Practices: Snowden and Whistleblowing Ethical Implications of  Emerging Technologies: Genetics, stem cell and embryo research: Embryo research  and women’s rights

Text Books And Reference Books:

 Hutchings, K. (2010) Global Ethics. An Introduction, Polity: Cambridge.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Copp, D. (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory, Oxford: OUP. 

Graham, G. (2008) Ethics and International Relations, 2nd Edition. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

LaFollette, H. (ed.) (2003) The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Practice, Oxford: OUP.

Evaluation Pattern

Evaluation Pattern

Total

CIA (Weight)

ESE (Weight)

Attendance

100

45%

50%

5%

Mid Semester Examination:

Group/Individual Assignment

45 Marks

 

End Semester Examination: 

Group/Individual Assignment

50 Marks

BPSY291AN - APPRECIATING AESTHETICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course aims to explore the phenomenon of aesthetics from a multidisciplinary perspective. Further, it helps the students to get exposed to a multidisciplinary approach to understanding realities.

Course Objectives: At the end of the course, students will be able to:

Understand the philosophy behind aesthetics

Understand human perception of aesthetics

Appreciate morality and aesthetic judgments

Take cognizance of the influence of technology on aesthetics

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: Discuss about the philosophy behind human aesthetics

CO2: Appreciate aesthetics from multiple perspectives

CO3: Create aesthetically appealing products

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:20
Aesthetics
 

Origin of modern aesthetics; the philosophy behind Aesthetics

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Aesthetic Mind
 

Psychology of Aesthetics; morality; aesthetic judgements; appreciation of the environment

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
Functional Aesthetics
 

Globalization and Technological influence on Aesthetics; digital interface; military; fashion; culture; art and architecture

Text Books And Reference Books:

Kivy, P. (Ed.). (2009). The Blackwell guide to aesthetics. John Wiley & Sons.                

Hughes, F. (2009). Kant's Critique of Aesthetic Judgement': A Reader's Guide. Bloomsbury Publishing.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Carlson, A. (2002). Aesthetics and the environment: The appreciation of nature, art and architecture. Psychology Press.

Schellekens, E., & Goldie, P. (Eds.). (2011). The aesthetic mind: Philosophy and psychology. Oxford University Press.

Evaluation Pattern

Individual Assignment

Mid-Semester Exam

Group Assignment

Attendance

25

45

25

05

BPSY291BN - HUMAN ENGINEERING AND ERGONOMICS (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

Course Description: This course will cover topics related to human engineering and ergonomics more from a psychological perspective. Students will get to learn cognitive, social, organizational, and safety aspects of the result of man-machine interaction. This course provides an overview of the design and strategies of the system for an effective understanding of the man-machine interface. 

 

Course Objectives: To enable students:

Understand resultant factors of man-machine interaction.

Cognize with pertinent factors related to increasing the efficiency of people in their working environment.

Develop the competency of theoretical understanding for human engineering and ergonomics.

Learning Outcome

CO1: Explain how man-machine interaction is an important aspect to work upon for increasing the efficiency of the people. Outline factors which are important for making an optimum working space and conditions.

CO2: To provide the student with an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge into practical situations

CO3: Reflect on and describe their personal attitudes and values that relate to Human factors and ergonomics

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:15
Introduction to Human Engineering and Ergonomics
 

Introduction to human engineering and ergonomics; Human factors engineering and systems design; Sensation and perception;

Cross-cultural design; Mental workload and situation awareness.

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:15
Job, Equipment, Workplace and Environmental Design
 

Task design and motivation; Job and team design; Workplace design;

Sound and noise; Illumination.

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:15
Design for Health, Safety and Comfort
 

Health and safety management: Organization and public spaces; Warnings and hazard communications; Design for people with functional limitations; Design for aging.

Text Books And Reference Books:

Hancock, Peter. A. (Ed.). (1999). Human performance and ergonomics. Academic Press.

Lee, J. D., Wickens, C. D., Liu, Y. & Boyle, L. N. (2017). Designing for people: An introduction to human factors engineering. CreateSpace. 

Guastello, S. J. (2014). Human factors engineering and ergonomics. CRC Press.

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

Salvendy, G. (Ed.). (2012). Handbook of human factors and ergonomics. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Helander, M. (2006). A Guide to Human factors and ergonomics. Taylor & Francis

Evaluation Pattern

 

Individual Assignment

Mid-Semester Exam

Group Assignment

Attendance

25

45

25

05

ENG291AN - CREATIVE WRITING (2021 Batch)

Total Teaching Hours for Semester:45
No of Lecture Hours/Week:3
Max Marks:100
Credits:3

Course Objectives/Course Description

 

This course will be helpful to introduce representative literary texts and analyze the craft behind creating a literary work, specifically focusing on the art of fiction writing.

 

This course is designed across five units; the first four units are—

 

1.     Introduction to plot (10 hours)

2.     Character Development (10 hours)

3.     World building(setting) (10 hours)

4.     Developing your personal style (10 hours)

5.     Drafting the story (5 hours)

 

This will give the students a hands-on practice to refine their fiction writing skills. The final unit of 5 hours will pay attention to writing the first draft of the story, getting the story reviewed among the peers, using the criticism to improve the text and finally, rewrite and submit a fine-tuned summative text. This course will aid the students to communicate their thoughts in the form of a literary work while also engaging with the works of their peers and offer constructive criticism. It will also equip them with essential editing and close reading skills while engaging with the critical thinking faculties and creativity. 

 

Learning Outcome

CO1: · Identify, analyze and interpret the themes and ideas present in literary texts.

CO2: · Learn how a literary work of art can create a cultural and societal impact.

CO3: · Produce original literary fiction pieces.

CO4: · Engage with the literary tradition productively.

CO5: · Understand and differentiate between different genres of writing.

Unit-1
Teaching Hours:10
Introduction to plot
 

Sl no

Activity

1

What is plot? How Plot works in Literature  

2

Character+ Action = Plot, Writing Exercise

3

Aristotle’s idea of plot  

4

The power of Structure, ABDCE structure

5

Writing practice

6

Introduction to a good scene:  Show Don’t tell

7

Writing practice

8

Editing

9

The whole story

10

Review and Revise

 

 

 

Reference (For the current Unit)

Plot and Structure, James Scott Bell (2004)

Unit-2
Teaching Hours:10
Character Development
 

Sl no

Activity

1

Discover Characters from life

2

Conception

3

Desire and Goals: building characters- writing practice

4

Creating relatable characters

5

Observation writing

6

Dialogue and monologue, conversation

7

Point of view

8

Quirks

9

Voice

10

Point of view writing exercise

 

 

Reference (For the current Unit)

Creating Character Arcs: The Masterful Author's Guide to Uniting Story Structure, K M Weiland

Unit-3
Teaching Hours:10
World building(setting)
 

 

Sl no

Activity

1

Creating a persuasive world

2

Writing activity

3

Adding Details

4

Writing activity  

5

Credibility and research

6

Meditation exercise

7

Fantastic landscape writing exercise

8

Genre-

9

Landscape description examples from literature  

10

Writing activity

 

 

Reference (For the current Unit)

The Writing Book: A Workbook for Fiction Writers, Kate Grenville

Unit-4
Teaching Hours:10
Developing your personal style
 

Sl no

Activity

1

Meaning, Sense and Clarity

2

Language rules and structure  

3

Word choice exercise

4

Nouns and verbs- close reading exercise

5

Writing exercise

6

Effective editing

7

Thinking like the reader  

8

Reflective activity  

9

Reading different styles and identifying personal style

10

Writing exercise

 

 

Reference (For the current Unit)

The Elements of Style, William Strunk Jr. and E. B. White

Unit-5
Teaching Hours:5
Portfolio
 

Peer Review and Revision

Final Submission

 

Text Books And Reference Books:

·      Julia Bell and Paul Magrs, The Creative Writing Coursebook (Macmillan, 2001)

·      Anne Bernays & Pamela Painter What If? Writing Exercises for Fiction Writers (Harper Collins, 1990)

·      Ailsa Cox, Writing Short Stories (Routledge, 2016)

·      A.L. Kennedy, On Writing (Vintage, 2014)

·      Ursula K Le Guin, Steering the Craft: A Twenty-first Century Guide to Sailing the Sea of Story (Mariner, 2015)

·      Sara Maitland, The Writer’s Way (Arcturus, 2005)

·      Nicola Morgan, Write to be Published (Snowbooks, 2011)

·      David Morley, The Cambridge Introduction to Creative Writing (Cambridge University Press, 2007)

·      Jerome Stern, Making Shapely Fiction (Norton, 1991)

·      S. King, On Writing

·      N. Goldberg, Writing Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer Within. Boston: Shambala Press, 1986.

·      R. Wolf, Jump Start: How to Write from Everyday Life. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2001

Essential Reading / Recommended Reading

The students will be provided with fictional reading material(excerpts or full texts) in each class to facilitate discussion.

Evaluation Pattern

 

Assessment (Nature of CIAs)

Weightage

1

CIA I : The plot

30

2

CIA II : Character Development project

30

3

CIA III : Final portfolio

30

4

Class Participation

05

5

Attendance

05

 

Total

100